Data Journalism: The Power of Data in Media and Communication

A special issue of Journalism and Media (ISSN 2673-5172).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 6087

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Media Informatics Lab, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: information technology in journalism; new media; course support environments; data journalism; open data; distance learning; content verification; algorithmic journalism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: intelligent systems; open data; data science; data journalism; knowledge graphs; machine learning; semantic web
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In today's continuously changing world, with breaking news, fake news, and news automation, data journalism which includes the collection, analysis, and publication of news articles that are based on data, becomes more important than ever before. However, data journalism is still developing at different speeds in different parts of the world. For example, in many Western hemisphere counties (USA, United Kingdom, Germany, and the Nordic countries) data journalism is considered to be at a maturation stage, but in other countries, data journalism is still at an initial stage of development or it does not exist. At the same time, the production of data is increasing exponentially since the digitization of our society is increasing and the value of the data is acknowledged at a world level. It is also worth mentioning that other parameters (cognitive, emotional, cultural) that affect data journalism perception have also started gaining attention. Many cases of leaked data, which have led to transnational data journalism projects that gain high publicity, have occurred in the last decade. This trend is expected to increase and intensify. Furthermore, new opportunities (i.e., chatbots, web analytics, etc.) for collecting data from journalists are now available, thus increasing the available data sources. Moreover, with data increasingly stored in extraordinary volume, investigative journalists can and have been using extraordinary data analysis such as machine learning techniques. 

In this context, this Special Issue of Journalism and Media will focus on theoretical, empirical, and geographical aspects of data journalism. This includes every aspect of data journalism (collecting, cleaning, analyzing, studying, visualizing, reporting, perceiving, understanding) and any issue that is related to data journalism and data visualization as well. Papers analyzing the state of data journalism in various countries or parts of the world are also welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Veglis
Dr. Charalampos Bratsas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • data journalism
  • visualization
  • data collection
  • data analysis
  • data journalism perception
  • data visualization perception

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2322 KiB  
Article
More Inclusive and Wider Sources: A Comparative Analysis of Data and Political Journalists on Twitter (Now X) in Germany
by Benedict Witzenberger and Jürgen Pfeffer
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 412-431; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010027 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 520
Abstract
Women are underrepresented in many areas of journalistic newsrooms. In this paper, we examine if this established effect persists in the new forms of journalistic communication, namely social media networks. We use mentions, retweets, and hashtags as measures of journalistic amplification and legitimation. [...] Read more.
Women are underrepresented in many areas of journalistic newsrooms. In this paper, we examine if this established effect persists in the new forms of journalistic communication, namely social media networks. We use mentions, retweets, and hashtags as measures of journalistic amplification and legitimation. Furthermore, we compare two groups of journalists in different stages of development: political and data journalists in Germany in 2021. Our results show that journalists identified as women tend to favor other women journalists in mentions and retweets on Twitter (now called X), compared to men. While both professions are dominated by men, with a high share of tweets authored by men, women mention and retweet other women more than their male colleagues. Female data journalists also leverage different sources than men. In addition, we found data journalists to be more inclusive of non-member sources in their networks compared to political journalists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Journalism: The Power of Data in Media and Communication)
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17 pages, 311 KiB  
Article
The Datafication of Newsrooms: A Study on Data Journalism Practices in a British Newspaper
by Ahmet Buğra Kalender
Journal. Media 2024, 5(1), 48-64; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia5010004 - 08 Jan 2024
Viewed by 885
Abstract
This study investigates the function of data journalism in a UK newsroom using Bourdieu’s field theory. The collection of study data was conducted through in-depth interviews, utilising a qualitative research methodology. The data obtained revealed that data journalism, a sub-field of journalism, continues [...] Read more.
This study investigates the function of data journalism in a UK newsroom using Bourdieu’s field theory. The collection of study data was conducted through in-depth interviews, utilising a qualitative research methodology. The data obtained revealed that data journalism, a sub-field of journalism, continues to develop in an interdisciplinary structure and creates a new type of habitus (data habitus) within the field of journalism. This study also shows that the data journalism team in the newspaper has moved from being niche to being established as one of the most active and effective main sections of the newsroom, and that data-driven journalism has the potential to influence other teams. Lastly, this study suggested that the newsroom is undergoing a process of datafication by indicating the newspaper’s intention to develop data skills beyond the data journalism team. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Journalism: The Power of Data in Media and Communication)
16 pages, 329 KiB  
Article
Understanding and Enhancing Journalism Students’ Perception of Data Journalism
by Elissavet Georgiadou and Maria Matsiola
Journal. Media 2023, 4(4), 1232-1247; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia4040078 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1347
Abstract
As the media landscape continuously evolves in response to the increasing dominance of data, it is important to understand how future journalists perceive and respond to the emerging discipline of data journalism. This paper explores the impact of an introductory session on data [...] Read more.
As the media landscape continuously evolves in response to the increasing dominance of data, it is important to understand how future journalists perceive and respond to the emerging discipline of data journalism. This paper explores the impact of an introductory session on data journalism conducted with second-year journalism students at Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. The study aims, through a focus group survey, to assess the students’ initial understanding and beliefs about data journalism and explores how an educational activity, structured as a one-time workshop utilizing a resource from the Al Jazeera Media Institute and data journalism project examples from the BBC, can elucidate the notion of data journalism and stimulate interest in the field. This study contributes to the ongoing discourse on the integration of data journalism into journalism curricula and the training of the next generation of journalists. Therefore, the findings could provide valuable insights for educators in understanding journalism students’ perception of data journalism in order to develop effective curricula and teaching methods for data journalism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Journalism: The Power of Data in Media and Communication)
28 pages, 12971 KiB  
Article
Data Journalism and Network Theory: A Study of Political Communication through X (Formerly Twitter) Interactions
by Alexandros Samalis, Alexandros Z. Spyropoulos, Georgios C. Makris, Charalampos Bratsas, Andreas Veglis, Vassilis Tsiantos, Anthoula Baliou, Emmanouel Garoufallou and Anastasios Ventouris
Journal. Media 2023, 4(4), 1141-1168; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia4040073 - 25 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1347
Abstract
This study investigates the research questions: “How do political connections within Greece’s governing party evolve, and what underlying patterns and dynamics are revealed through a network analysis of interactions on X (formerly Twitter)?” To address these questions, data were [...] Read more.
This study investigates the research questions: “How do political connections within Greece’s governing party evolve, and what underlying patterns and dynamics are revealed through a network analysis of interactions on X (formerly Twitter)?” To address these questions, data were collected from X, focusing on following, retweeting, and mentioning activities among the politicians within the governing party. The interactions were meticulously analysed using tools derived from Network Theory in mathematics, including in and out-strength centrality, hubs and authorities centralities, and in and out-vertex entropy. In line with the emerging field of data journalism, this approach enhances the rigour and depth of analysis, facilitating a more nuanced understanding of complex political landscapes. The findings reveal complex and dynamic structures that may reflect internal relationships, communication strategies, and the influence of recurring events on these connections within the party. This study thus provides novel insights into understanding political communication via social networks and demonstrates the applicative potential of Network Theory and data journalism techniques in social sciences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Journalism: The Power of Data in Media and Communication)
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