Special Issue "Edible Mushrooms 2.0"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2022 | Viewed by 4606

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Monika Gasecka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-625 Poznan, Poland
Interests: bioactive compounds in mushrooms; quality of mushrooms; effect of substrate composition on composition of fruiting bodies; phenolic compounds in mushrooms; role of phenolic compounds in response to stress factors in plants and mushrooms; metal detoxification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Zuzanna Magdziak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-625 Poznan, Poland
Interests: organic acids in mushrooms; role of organic acids in response to stress factors (especially low molecular weight organic acids under toxic elements); quantitative analysis of active compounds; metal detoxification; phytoextraction/phytostabilization; metal–organic acid complexes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be dedicated to edible mushrooms and welcomes articles (original research papers, perspectives, hypotheses, opinions, reviews, modeling approaches, and methods) concerning a wide range of topics related to the chemical composition of fruiting bodies and the factors affecting their quality. Edible mushrooms, both cultivated and wild-growing, are an increasingly important component of the human diet all over the world, and their consumption depends on the region. Mushrooms are valued not only for their aroma, enriching the taste of many dishes, but also because they are a source of valuable substances exerting a positive influence on human health and metabolism. The nutritional value of edible mushrooms is related to the presence of nutrients and other bioactive compounds with antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. The chemical composition may be modified during the cultivation, storage, or processing stages. Therefore, the quality of products reaching customers is extremely important. Many studies concerning edible mushrooms focus on determining the content of bioactive compounds in fruiting bodies and their benefits to human health. Moreover, the role of substrate composition on fruiting bodies’ quality is of emerging interest. Mushroom biofortification appears to be an interesting strategy for delivering nutrients in order to reduce the occurrence of diseases caused by deficiencies of elements (it is important that the ingredients be present in food in easily digestible forms). However, it should also be remembered that fungi can also supply harmful substances, including toxic metals. Therefore, it is extremely important to analyze the composition and quality of the product that reaches consumers.

Prof. Dr. Monika Gasecka
Dr. Zuzanna Magdziak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mushrooms quality
  • substrate quality
  • bioactive compounds
  • nutritional biofortification of mushrooms toxic substances
  • contamination of mushrooms
  • metals/metalloids
  • quantitative analysis
  • nutritional value of mushrooms
  • medicinal value of mushrooms

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Effect of Different Light Qualities and Intensities on the Yield and Quality of Facility-Grown Pleurotus eryngii
J. Fungi 2022, 8(12), 1244; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8121244 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 235
Abstract
Proper light is essential for the formation and development of macrofungi fruiting bodies. Currently, there are unclear treatment conditions, such as light quality and light intensity, in the production of Pleurotus eryngii in intensive cultivation facilities, which is not helpful to the formation [...] Read more.
Proper light is essential for the formation and development of macrofungi fruiting bodies. Currently, there are unclear treatment conditions, such as light quality and light intensity, in the production of Pleurotus eryngii in intensive cultivation facilities, which is not helpful to the formation and implementation of standardized production programs. The research discussed in this paper investigated the effects of different light quality and intensity conditions on the yield and quality of P. eryngii. The results showed that the yield and nutritional quality of the red light treatment samples were higher than those of the white light control, the commercial properties were good, and the energy consumption of the red LED light source was the lowest under the same light intensity. The results of this experiment further provide a reference for the energy-saving and high-quality cultivation of P. eryngii. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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Article
The Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPRs) on Yield and Some Quality Parameters during Shelf Life in White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus L.)
J. Fungi 2022, 8(10), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8101016 - 27 Sep 2022
Viewed by 406
Abstract
The use of different bacteria that increase yield and quality in plant production has become common since the 1990s. However, effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) treatments during the cultivation period of white button mushroom on quality during marketing duration are not [...] Read more.
The use of different bacteria that increase yield and quality in plant production has become common since the 1990s. However, effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) treatments during the cultivation period of white button mushroom on quality during marketing duration are not known exactly. This study was carried out to determine the effects of different PGPRs in compost medium on mushroom yield and quality. For this reason, Azospillum lipoferum, Bacillus megaterium, Frateuria aurantia and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, for promoting nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulfur transport, respectively, were applied at a 3 mL per m2 concentration on the 12th day of the spawn run period. Control groups were treated with only water. Azospillum lipoferum increased yield at a rate of 33.3% by enhancing mushroom number per unit area. Shelf life characteristics were observed in mushrooms after storage at 1 °C and at 20 ± 1 °C for 2 days. Bacillus megaterium, Frateuria aurantia and Thiobacillus thiooxidans treatments decreased weight loss and loss in cap firmness, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity during shelf life. However, Azospillum lipoferum for increased yield and Frateuria aurantia and Bacillus megaterium for maintaining postharvest quality were promising treatments during shelf life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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Article
Odor Profile of Four Cultivated and Freeze-Dried Edible Mushrooms by Using Sensory Panel, Electronic Nose and GC-MS
J. Fungi 2022, 8(9), 953; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8090953 - 11 Sep 2022
Viewed by 838
Abstract
Cultivated mushrooms are well-known nutrient inputs for an equilibrated diet. Some species are broadly appreciated due to their medicinal properties. Lately, a number of novel foods and nutraceuticals based on dehydrated and freeze-dried powder obtained from cultivated mushrooms has been reaching the market. [...] Read more.
Cultivated mushrooms are well-known nutrient inputs for an equilibrated diet. Some species are broadly appreciated due to their medicinal properties. Lately, a number of novel foods and nutraceuticals based on dehydrated and freeze-dried powder obtained from cultivated mushrooms has been reaching the market. The food industry requires fast and reliable tools to prevent fraud. In this, work we have cultivated Agaricus bisporus sp. bisporus (AB) (white button mushroom), Agaricus bisporus sp. brunnescens (ABP) (portobello), Lentinula edodes (LE) (shiitake) and Grifola frondosa (GF) (maitake) using tailor-made substrates for the different species and standardized cropping conditions, which were individually freeze-dried to obtain the samples under evaluation. The aim of this article was to validate the use of two different methodologies, namely, electronic nose and sensory panel, to discriminate the olfactory profile of nutritional products based on freeze-dried mushrooms from the different cultivated species. Additionally, GC-MS was used to detect and quantify the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the samples. The multivariate analysis performed proved the utility of electronic nose as an analytical tool, which was similar to the classical sensory panel but faster in distinguishing among the different species, with one limitation it being unable to differentiate between the same species. GC-MS analysis showed the chemical volatile formulation of the samples, also showing significant differences between different samples but high similarities between varieties of the same cultivated species. The techniques employed can be used to prevent fraud and have the potential to evaluate further medicinal mushroom species and build solid and trustful connections between these novel food products and potential consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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Article
Pseudo-Chromosomal Genome Assembly in Combination with Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis in Agaricus bisporus Strain KMCC00540 Reveals Mechanical Stimulus Responsive Genes Associated with Browning Effect
J. Fungi 2022, 8(8), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8080886 - 22 Aug 2022
Viewed by 611
Abstract
Agaricus bisporus is one of the world’s most popular edible mushrooms, including in South Korea. We performed de novo genome assembly with a South Korean white-colored cultivar of A. bisporus, KMCC00540. After generating a scaffold-level genomic sequence, we inferred chromosome-level assembly by [...] Read more.
Agaricus bisporus is one of the world’s most popular edible mushrooms, including in South Korea. We performed de novo genome assembly with a South Korean white-colored cultivar of A. bisporus, KMCC00540. After generating a scaffold-level genomic sequence, we inferred chromosome-level assembly by genomic synteny analysis with the representative A. bisporus strains H97 and H39. The KMCC00540 genome had 13 pseudochromosomes comprising 33,030,236 bp mostly covering both strains. A comparative genomic analysis with cultivar H97 indicated that most genomic regions and annotated proteins were shared (over 90%), ensuring that our cultivar could be used as a representative genome. However, A. bisporus suffers from browning even from only a slight mechanical stimulus during transportation, which significantly lowers its commercial value. To identify which genes respond to a mechanical stimulus that induces browning, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis based on the de novo assembled genome. Mechanical stimulus induces up-regulation in long fatty acid ligase activity-related genes, as well as melanin biosynthesis genes, especially at early time points. In summary, we assembled the chromosome-level genomic information on a Korean strain of A. bisporus and identified which genes respond to a mechanical stimulus, which provided key hints for improving the post-harvest biological control of A. bisporus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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Article
Analysis of Biochemical and Genetic Variability of Pleurotus ostreatus Based on the β-Glucans and CDDP Markers
J. Fungi 2022, 8(6), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8060563 - 25 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 851
Abstract
Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is still one of the most cultivated edible and medicinal mushrooms. Despite its frequent cultivation around the world, there is currently just a little information available on the variability of strains in terms of the content of [...] Read more.
Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is still one of the most cultivated edible and medicinal mushrooms. Despite its frequent cultivation around the world, there is currently just a little information available on the variability of strains in terms of the content of β-glucans in them. This work presents an extensive study of 60 strains in terms of the content of α-glucans and β-glucans in their caps and stipes. The authenticity of the production strains based on an analysis of the variability of their genome by CDDP (Conserved DNA-derived polymorphism) markers was confirmed, whereas identical CDDP profiles were identified between samples 45, 89, 95, and 96. Genetic variability of the analyzed production strains showed a high polymorphism and effective discriminative power of the used marking technique. Medium positive correlations were found among the CDDP profiles and β-glucan content in the group of strains that generated the same CDDP profiles, and low negative correlation was found among these profiles in the group of low β-glucan content strains. For the determination of glucans content, Mushroom and Yeast analytical enzymatic kit (Megazyme, Bray, Co. Wicklow, Ireland) were used. The results clearly showed that the stipe contains on average 33% more β-glucans than the cap. The minimum detected β-glucan content in the stipe was in strain no. 72, specifically 22%, and the maximum in strain no. 43, specifically 56%, which after the conversion represents a difference of 155%. From the point of view of β-glucan content, the stated strain no. 43 appears to be very suitable for the commercial production of β-glucans under certain conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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Article
Management of Green Mold Disease in White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and Its Yield Improvement
J. Fungi 2022, 8(6), 554; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8060554 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1162
Abstract
Mycoparasites cause serious losses in profitable mushroom farms worldwide. The negative impact of green mold (Trichoderma harzianum) reduces cropping surface and damages basidiomes, limiting production and harvest quality. The goal of the current study was to evaluate new generation fungicides, to [...] Read more.
Mycoparasites cause serious losses in profitable mushroom farms worldwide. The negative impact of green mold (Trichoderma harzianum) reduces cropping surface and damages basidiomes, limiting production and harvest quality. The goal of the current study was to evaluate new generation fungicides, to devise suitable management strategies against the green mold disease under prevailing agro-climatic conditions. Six non-systemic and five systemic fungitoxicants were evaluated for their efficacy against pathogen, T. harzianum, and host, Agaricus bisporus, under in vitro conditions. Among non-systemic fungicides, chlorothalonil and prochloraz manganese with mean mycelium inhibition of 76.87 and 93.40 percent, respectively, were highly inhibitory against the pathogen. The least inhibition percentage of 7.16 of A. bisporus was exhibited by chlorothalonil. Under in vivo conditions, use of captan 50 WP resulted in a maximum yield of button mushroom of 14.96 kg/qt. So far, systemic fungicides were concerned, carbendazim proved extremely inhibitory to the pathogen (89.22%), with least inhibitory effect on host mycelium (1.56%). However, application of non-systemic fungitoxicants further revealed that fungicide prochloraz manganese 50 WP at 0.1–0.2 percent or chlorothalonil 50 WP at 0.2 percent, exhibited maximum disease control of 89.06–96.30 percent. Moreover, the results of systemic fungitoxicants showed that carbendazim 50 WP or thiophanate methyl 70 WP at 0.1 percent reduced disease to 2.29–3.69 percent, hence exhibiting the disease control of 80.11–87.66 percent. Under in vivo conditions, fungicide myclobutanil at 0.1 percent concentration produced the maximum button mushroom production of 12.87 kg/q. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Mushrooms 2.0)
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