Special Issue "Cell Wall Stress Response"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Raffaella Maria Balestrini
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection National Research Council of Italy, IPSP-CNR, Turin, Italy
Interests: cell wall; genomics and functional genomics of symbiotic fungi; mycorrhizal fungi; plant-microbe interactions; abiotic stresses
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Fabiano Sillo
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection (IPSP)-CNR, Torino, Italy
Interests: genomics and transcriptomics; fungal ecology and evolution; plant pathogens; mycorrhizal fungi; plant-microbe interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fungi live in different environments and can be subjected to several extreme conditions. Among the plethora of stresses faced by fungi are pH, osmotic and thermal changes, oxide radicals, nutrient deprivation, and exposure to chemicals. The fungal cell wall is the primary barrier against the external environment, playing a central role in the maintenance of cellular integrity, but it is also the first point of contact between the environment and the fungus. To maintain cell integrity in the face of environmental stresses, the cell wall must adapt to external challenges that could compromise cell wall structure. The cell wall responds to every stress source by triggering response pathways involved in cell wall integrity signaling and cell wall remodeling. Additionally, fungal cell wall metabolism is also affected during symbiotic interactions with plants such as in mycorrhizal symbioses. In recent years, the so called -omics tools, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, have contributed to elucidating the role of various pathways and individual proteins in the response of the fungal cell wall to both biotic and abiotic environmental factors.

Given the recent developments in this field, the purpose of this Special Issue is to provide new insights into how fungi deal with the environment by modifying their cell walls. All types of manuscripts (original research and reviews) providing new insights from research on the impact of environmental factors, including interactions with other organisms, are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Raffaella Maria Balestrini
Dr. Fabiano Sillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fungal cell wall
  • environmental stress
  • cell wall remodeling
  • symbiosis
  • cell wall polysaccharide

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of a Candida albicans Mutant Defective in All MAPKs Highlights the Major Role of Hog1 in the MAPK Signaling Network
J. Fungi 2020, 6(4), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6040230 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
The success of Candida albicans as a pathogen relies on its ability to adapt and proliferate in different environmental niches. Pathways regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in sensing environmental conditions and developing an accurate adaptive response. Given the frequent cooperative [...] Read more.
The success of Candida albicans as a pathogen relies on its ability to adapt and proliferate in different environmental niches. Pathways regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in sensing environmental conditions and developing an accurate adaptive response. Given the frequent cooperative roles of these routes in cellular functions, we have generated mutants defective in all combinations of the four described MAPKs in C. albicans and characterized its phenotype regarding sensitiveness to specific drugs, morphogenesis and interaction with host immune cells. We demonstrate that all MAPKs are dispensable in this yeast as a mutant defective in Cek1, Cek2, Mkc1 and Hog1 is viable although highly sensitive to oxidative and osmotic stress, displaying a specific pattern of sensitivity to antifungals. By comparing its phenotype with single, double and triple combinations of MAPK-deletion mutants we were able to unveil a Cek1-independent mechanism for Hog1 resistance to Congo red, and confirm the predominant effect of Hog1 on oxidative and osmotic adaptation. The quadruple mutant produces filaments under non-inducing conditions, but is unable to develop chlamydospores. Furthermore, cek1 cek2 mkc1 hog1 cells switch to the opaque state at high frequency, which is blocked by the ectopic expression of HOG1 suggesting a role of this kinase for phenotypic switching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell Wall Stress Response)
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