Special Issue "Candida auris 2.0"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jacques F. Meis
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Guest Editor
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital (CWZ), 6532 Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: candida; Candida auris; drug resistance fungal; emerging fungal diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Anuradha Chowdhary
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Guest Editor
Department of Medical Mycology, Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007, India
Interests: candida; Candida auris; medical mycology; fungal biology; medical microbiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This year marks the 11th anniversary of the first formal description of Candida auris, isolated from the external ear of a Japanese patient in 2009. Retrospective studies of culture collections of yeasts from before 2009 only showed single isolates from Korea in 1996 (the earliest known isolate to date) and from Pakistan in 2008. In a relatively short period, C. auris was able to spread all over the world, mainly in hospitals, and has now been reported from six continents and more than 40 countries. Several countries have reported persistent problems and prolonged outbreaks in healthcare facilities. Unlike other Candida spp., C. auris seems to colonize the skin of patients and can contaminate hospital environments.

C. auris is easily transmitted in healthcare settings and is the first fungus to behave like an epidemic nosocomial bacterial pathogen. Transmission within and between hospitals and nursing home facilities confronts us with major infection control challenges, prompting authorities in the US to declare colonization or infection with C. auris as a notifiable disease from 2019 onwards. More than 90% of C. auris isolates are fluconazole resistant, with some rare isolates also being resistant to all three major antifungal classes, leaving no possible treatment options. A major explanation for the quick worldwide spread was that C. auris is often misidentified as other Candida spp., notably C. haemulonii, or as Saccharomyces when identification methods based on phenotype are used. Manufacturers are now working to solve this problem of routine identification, though molecular methods or MALDI-TOF can reliably identify C. auris. We invite you to consider submitting the results of your latest original studies or clinical cases involving this special pathogen, C. auris, to this Special Issue of the Journal of Fungi.

Prof. Dr. Jacques F. Meis
Prof. Dr. Anuradha Chowdhary
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • candida
  • Candida auris
  • drug-resistant fungi
  • infection control
  • emerging fungal diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Candida auris Direct Detection from Surveillance Swabs, Blood, and Urine Using a Laboratory-Developed PCR Method
J. Fungi 2020, 6(4), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6040224 - 15 Oct 2020
Abstract
Candida auris is an emerging fungal pathogen with cases reported in countries around the world and in 19 states within the United States as of August 2020. The CDC has recommended that hospitals perform active surveillance upon admission for patients with the appropriate [...] Read more.
Candida auris is an emerging fungal pathogen with cases reported in countries around the world and in 19 states within the United States as of August 2020. The CDC has recommended that hospitals perform active surveillance upon admission for patients with the appropriate risk factors. Currently, active surveillance requires that local hospitals send surveillance swabs to a public health laboratory for analysis. In this work, a real-time PCR assay was developed for the specific detection of C. auris from surveillance swabs, blood, and urine to enable rapid detection of this pathogen. The assay uses commercially available primers and reporter probes and it was verified on the LightCycler 480 PCR platform. Contrived specimens and prospectively collected composite groin/axilla surveillance swabs were used to validate the assay. The performance of the PCR assay on surveillance swabs was also compared to a second PCR assay targeting C. auris that was performed at the Minnesota Department of Health–Public Health Laboratory (MDH-PHL). Our PCR assay is able to detect and differentiate C. auris from closely related Candida species such as C. duobushaemulonii, C. haemulonii, and C. pseudohaemulonii on the basis of melting curve temperature differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Candida auris 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Microsatellite Typing, ITS Sequencing, AFLP Fingerprinting, MALDI-TOF MS, and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of Candida auris
J. Fungi 2020, 6(3), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6030146 - 25 Aug 2020
Abstract
Candida auris is an emerging opportunistic yeast species causing nosocomial outbreaks at a global scale. A few studies have focused on the C. auris genotypic structure. Here, we compared five epidemiological typing tools using a set of 96 C. auris isolates from 14 [...] Read more.
Candida auris is an emerging opportunistic yeast species causing nosocomial outbreaks at a global scale. A few studies have focused on the C. auris genotypic structure. Here, we compared five epidemiological typing tools using a set of 96 C. auris isolates from 14 geographical areas. Isolates were analyzed by microsatellite typing, ITS sequencing, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprint analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. Microsatellite typing grouped the isolates into four main clusters, corresponding to the four known clades in concordance with whole genome sequencing studies. The other investigated typing tools showed poor performance compared with microsatellite typing. A comparison between the five methods showed the highest agreement between microsatellite typing and ITS sequencing with 45% similarity, followed by microsatellite typing and the FTIR method with 33% similarity. The lowest agreement was observed between FTIR spectroscopy, MALDI-TOF MS, and ITS sequencing. This study indicates that microsatellite typing is the tool of choice for C. auris outbreak investigations. Additionally, FTIR spectroscopy requires further optimization and evaluation before it can be used as an epidemiological typing method, comparable with microsatellite typing, as a rapid method for tracing nosocomial fungal outbreaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Candida auris 2.0)
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