Special Issue "Molecular Genetics and Genomics of Mushroom-Forming Fungi"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Genomics, Genetics and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2023 | Viewed by 208

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hoi Shan Kwan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China
Interests: mushroom genomics; fungal evolution; molecular genetics of mushrooms; population genomics of mushrooms; fungal pathogens of trees

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to contribute to this Journal of Fungi Special Issue, “Molecular Genetics and Genomics of Mushroom-Forming Fungi”. This is a terrific opportunity for those with a passion for the study of mushrooms to publish their recent achievements in a Special Issue of this excellent emerging journal. Mushroom-forming fungi serve as excellent models for the study of fungal development, differentiation, genetic regulation, morphogenesis, and evolution. We have all been fascinated by the complex structure of microscopic mycelium. Conspicuous mushrooms and their related sclerotia enable relatively easy investigation of many biological processes in the fungal life cycle. However, although mushrooms have been used as food and medicine for thousands of years, their basic biology and genetics have not been well understood. It was not until the early 1990s, when advancements in molecular genetic technology enabled the study of living organisms with less-known basic genetics and genetic tools, that molecular genetic studies of mushrooms began. These advances in genomic technology (a result of the human genome project) allowed researchers to conduct more in-depth and wholistic analyses of mushrooms’ gene regulation, genetic structure, development, and evolution. Now, with the improved power and accessibility of advanced molecular genetic and genomic tools, researchers can develop a better understanding of mushroom biology. The scope of existing studies has expanded from single-gene to whole-genome studies, and from model mushrooms to those with nutritional and medicinal values. The advancement of basic and applied mushroom science has indeed been immense.

I encourage you to join me in showcasing recent achievements in the molecular genetics and genomics of mushroom-forming fungi in this focused Special Issue of the Journal of Fungi. This issue will serve as a benchmark for the high level of science conducted in this interesting and exciting field of Mushroom Biology.

Prof. Dr. Hoi Shan Kwan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mushrooms
  • genomics
  • population genomics
  • DNA sequencing
  • RNA sequencing
  • transcriptomics
  • epigenomics
  • phylogeny
  • evolution
  • multicellularity
  • mating types
  • genetic architecture
  • fruiting body development
  • CRISPR

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Comparative Proteomic Analyses within Three Developmental Stages of the Mushroom White Hypsizygus marmoreus
J. Fungi 2023, 9(2), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9020225 (registering DOI) - 08 Feb 2023
Abstract
(1) Background: The Hypsizygus marmoreus is a popular edible mushroom in East Asian markets. In a previous study, we reported the proteomic analyses of different developmental stages of H. marmoreus, from primordium to mature fruiting body. However, the growth and protein expression [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The Hypsizygus marmoreus is a popular edible mushroom in East Asian markets. In a previous study, we reported the proteomic analyses of different developmental stages of H. marmoreus, from primordium to mature fruiting body. However, the growth and protein expression changes from scratching to primordium are unclear. (2) Methods: A label-free LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis technique was adopted to obtain the protein expression profiles of three groups of samples collected in different growth stages from scratching to the tenth day after scratching. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis and principal component analysis were performed to reveal the correlation among samples. The differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were organized. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was performed to divide the DEPs into different metabolic processes and pathways. (3) Results: From the 3rd day to the 10th day after scratching, mycelium recovered gradually and formed primordia. Compared with the Rec stage, 218 highly expressed proteins were identified in the Knot stage. Compared with the Pri stage, 217 highly expressed proteins were identified in the Rec stage. Compared with the Pri stage, 53 highly expressed proteins were identified in the Knot stage. A variety of the same highly expressed proteins were identified in these three developmental stages, including: glutathione S-transferase, acetyltransferase, importin, dehydrogenase, heat-shock proteins, ribosomal proteins, methyltransferase, etc. The key pathways in the development of H. marmoreus are metabolic process, catabolic process, oxidoreductase activity and hydrolase activity. DEPs in the Knot or Pri stages compared with the Rec stage were significantly decreased in the metabolic-, catabolic- and carbohydrate-related process; and the oxidoreductase, peptidase, and hydrolase activity, which can serve as targets for selectable molecular breeding in H. marmoreus. A total of 2000 proteins were classified into eight different modules by WGCNA, wherein 490 proteins were classified into the turquoise module. (4) Conclusions: Generally, from the 3rd day to the 10th day after scratching, mycelium recovered gradually and formed primordia. Importin, dehydrogenase, heat-shock proteins, ribosomal proteins, transferases were all highly expressed in these three developmental stages. DEPs in the Rec stage compared with the Knot or Pri stages were significantly enriched in the metabolic-, catabolic- and carbohydrate-related process; and in oxidoreductase, peptidase and hydrolase activities. This research contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of the development changes before primordium of H. marmoreus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Genetics and Genomics of Mushroom-Forming Fungi)
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