Fungal Infections: New Challenges and Opportunities, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogenesis and Disease Control".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3984

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology and Virology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia
Interests: biofilm; Candida; MRSA; virulence; resistance; farnesol; photodynamic inactivation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive and superficial fungal infections result in a noteworthy global rate of morbidity and mortality. It is recognized that the pathogenicity of fungal species is closely related to the general host immunity state. Indeed, this occurs very commonly as a consequence of other health problems, such as cancer, HIV, denture wearing, tobacco smoking, chemo, and corticosteroid therapies. The quick identification and detection of the fungal species involved in infections is crucial to apply an effective treatment. Additionally, in recent decades, antifungal drug resistance has been growing fast. Taking into consideration the increasing number of fungal species and strains with elevated antifungal drug resistance, it is quite important to search for effective alternative therapies to the current antifungal agents (e.g., natural and synthetic compounds, photodynamic therapy).

This SI intents to present new data on fungal infections, fungal biofilms, novel treatments, and innovative and quick methods (e.g., microfluidic devices, molecular techniques) to identify fungal pathogens. Original articles, case studies, and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Célia F. Rodrigues
Dr. Lucia Černáková
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fungi
  • infection
  • antifungal resistance
  • Candida spp.
  • Aspergillus spp.
  • co-infection
  • detection method
  • identification
  • alternative treatment
  • virulence

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

18 pages, 3616 KiB  
Article
Candida tropicalis Affects Candida albicans Virulence by Limiting Its Capacity to Adhere to the Host Intestinal Surface, Leading to Decreased Susceptibility to Colitis in Mice
by Kyle Roberts, Abdullah Osme, Carlo De Salvo, Eleonora Zoli, Janet Herrada, Thomas S. McCormick, Mahmoud Ghannoum, Fabio Cominelli and Luca Di Martino
J. Fungi 2024, 10(4), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof10040245 - 25 Mar 2024
Viewed by 842
Abstract
Candida (C.) infections represent a serious health risk for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease. An important fungal virulence factor is the capacity of the fungus to form biofilms on the colonized surface of the host. This research study aimed to [...] Read more.
Candida (C.) infections represent a serious health risk for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease. An important fungal virulence factor is the capacity of the fungus to form biofilms on the colonized surface of the host. This research study aimed to determine the effect of a C. tropicalis and C. albicans co-infection on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. The colitis severity was evaluated using histology and a colonoscopy. The mice were mono-inoculated with C. albicans or C. tropicalis or co-challenged with both species. The mice were administered 3% DSS to induce acute colitis. The biofilm activity was assessed using (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl] 2H-tetrazoliumhydroxide (XTT) and dry-weight assays. The abundance of C. albicans in the colon tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The co-challenged mice showed a decreased colitis severity compared to the mono-inoculated mice. The dry-weight assay demonstrated a marked decrease in C. albicans biofilm production in a C. albicans culture incubated with C. tropicalis supernatant. Immunohistochemical staining showed that C. albicans was more abundant in the mucosa of C. albicans mono-inoculated mice compared to the co-inoculated group. These data indicate an antagonistic microbial interaction between the two Candida species, where C. tropicalis may produce molecules capable of limiting the ability of C. albicans to adhere to the host intestinal surface, leading to a reduction in biofilm formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections: New Challenges and Opportunities, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

12 pages, 694 KiB  
Article
Frequency of Detection of Candida auris Colonization Outside a Highly Endemic Setting: What Is the Optimal Strategy for Screening of Carriage?
by Laura Magnasco, Malgorzata Mikulska, Chiara Sepulcri, Nadir Ullah, Daniele Roberto Giacobbe, Antonio Vena, Vincenzo Di Pilato, Edward Willison, Andrea Orsi, Giancarlo Icardi, Anna Marchese and Matteo Bassetti
J. Fungi 2024, 10(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof10010026 - 29 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1125
Abstract
Candida auris outbreaks are increasingly frequent worldwide. In our 1000-bed hospital, an endemic transmission of C. auris was established in two of five intensive care units (ICUs). Aims of our study were to describe the occurrence of new cases of C. auris colonization [...] Read more.
Candida auris outbreaks are increasingly frequent worldwide. In our 1000-bed hospital, an endemic transmission of C. auris was established in two of five intensive care units (ICUs). Aims of our study were to describe the occurrence of new cases of C. auris colonization and infection outside the endemic ICUs, in order to add evidence for future policies on screening in patients discharged as negative from an endemic setting, as well as to propose a new algorithm for screening of such high-risk patients. From 26 March 2021 to 26 January 2023, among 392 patients who were diagnosed as colonized or infected with C. auris in our hospital, 84 (21.4%) received the first diagnosis of colonization or infection outside the endemic ICUs. A total of 68 patients out of 84 (81.0%) had a history of prior admission to the endemic ICUs. All were screened and tested negative during their ICU stay with a median time from last screening to discharge of 3 days. In 57/68 (83.8%) of patients, C. auris was detected through screening performed after ICU discharge, and 90% had C. auris colonization detected within 9 days from ICU discharge. In 13 cases (13/57 screened, 22.8%), the first post-ICU discharge screening was negative. In those not screened, candidemia was the most frequent event of the first C. auris detection (6/11 patients not screened). In settings where the transmission of C. auris is limited to certain wards, we suggest screening both at discharge from the endemic ward(s) even in case of a recent negative result, and at least twice after admission to nonendemic settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections: New Challenges and Opportunities, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 733 KiB  
Review
Fungal Infections in the Caribbean: A Review of the Literature to Date
by Nicole Gousy, Bharadwaj Adithya Sateesh, David W. Denning, Krystal Latchman, Edmond Mansoor, Jillwin Joseph and Prasanna Honnavar
J. Fungi 2023, 9(12), 1177; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9121177 - 8 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1556
Abstract
The most common fungal infections reported from the Caribbean include dermatophytosis, candidiasis, pneumocystis, aspergillosis, histoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis. The Caribbean is hyperendemic for histoplasmosis, with high population exposures. Fungal infections are a significant public health problem in the Caribbean, with rates varying depending on [...] Read more.
The most common fungal infections reported from the Caribbean include dermatophytosis, candidiasis, pneumocystis, aspergillosis, histoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis. The Caribbean is hyperendemic for histoplasmosis, with high population exposures. Fungal infections are a significant public health problem in the Caribbean, with rates varying depending on the specific country or region. In Trinidad and Tobago, the fungal burden accounts for 3.3% of the 1.4 million population, while in Jamaica, with a population of 2.9 million, over 57,600 people suffer from fungal infections each year. A study in the Dominican Republic estimated that approximately 221,027 (2%) of over 10 million people have a serious fungal infection. Fungal infections accounts for 21.9% of all skin infections in Haiti. The diagnosis of fungal infections in the Caribbean can be challenging, as access to laboratory testing and specialized medical services is limited in many areas. Access to antifungal medications can also be a challenge in some areas, and antifungal resistance has been reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections: New Challenges and Opportunities, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop