Modeling Waves Generated by Tsunamigenic Source

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2021) | Viewed by 7787

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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Roma Tre University, 00146 Rome, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; tsunami; wave numerical modelling; experimental modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well know how destructive, although rare, could be tsunami waves inundating coastal areas. The scientific community continues to conduct detailed research on this topic, attempting to model the generation mechanism, the behavior of tsunami wave during propagation, and the inland inundation phase. The ultimate goal is to provide clear knowledge of the phenomena to set up tsunami hazard and risk analysis systems to estimate the wave energy in real time, to build inundation maps, and so on.

As Guest Editor for the Special Issue “Modelling Waves Generated by Tsunamigenic Source” of the open access Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, I would like to invite you to publish a paper in this Issue. Either physical and mathematical approaches will fit the topic. Contributions involving wave generation, wave propagation both in near and far field, probabilistic tsunami hazard, and risk assessment are also encouraged.

Dr. Claudia Cecioni
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Hydrodynamic wave modeling
  • Tsunamigenic earthquake
  • Tsunamigenic landslide
  • Experimental modeling
  • Tsunami hazard and risk
  • Tsunami warning system

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 9925 KiB  
Article
Rapid Assessment of Tsunami Offshore Propagation and Inundation with D-FLOW Flexible Mesh and SFINCS for the 2011 Tōhoku Tsunami in Japan
by Björn R. Röbke, Tim Leijnse, Gundula Winter, Maarten van Ormondt, Joana van Nieuwkoop and Reimer de Graaff
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(5), 453; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9050453 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2997
Abstract
This study demonstrates the skills of D-FLOW Flexible Mesh (FM) and SFINCS (Super-Fast INundation of CoastS) in combination with the Delft Dashboard Tsunami Toolbox to numerically simulate tsunami offshore propagation and inundation based on the example of the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami in Japan. [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates the skills of D-FLOW Flexible Mesh (FM) and SFINCS (Super-Fast INundation of CoastS) in combination with the Delft Dashboard Tsunami Toolbox to numerically simulate tsunami offshore propagation and inundation based on the example of the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami in Japan. Caused by a megathrust earthquake, this is one of the most severe tsunami events in recent history, resulting in vast inundation and devastation of the Japanese coast. The comparison of the simulated with the measured offshore water levels at four DART buoys located in the north-western Pacific Ocean shows that especially the FM but also the SFINCS model accurately reproduce the observed tsunami propagation. The inundation observed at the Sendai coast is well reproduced by both models. All in all, the model outcomes are consistent with the findings gained in earlier simulation studies. Depending on the specific needs of future tsunami simulations, different possibilities for the application of both models are conceivable: (i) the exclusive use of FM to achieve high accuracy of the tsunami offshore propagation, with the option to use an all-in-one model domain (no nesting required) and to add tsunami sediment dynamics, (ii) the combined use of FM for the accurate simulation of the tsunami propagation and of SFINCS for the accurate and time efficient simulation of the onshore inundation and (iii) the exclusive use of SFINCS to get a reliable picture of the tsunami propagation and accurate results for the onshore inundation within seconds of computational time. This manuscript demonstrates the suitability of FM and SFINCS for the rapid and reliable assessment of tsunami propagation and inundation and discusses use cases of the three model combinations that form an important base for tsunami risk management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modeling Waves Generated by Tsunamigenic Source)
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11 pages, 2700 KiB  
Article
Mega-Ship-Generated Tsunami: A Field Observation in Tampa Bay, Florida
by Ping Wang and Jun Cheng
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(4), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9040437 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4122
Abstract
The displacement of a large amount of water in a moderate-sized estuary by a fast-moving mega-ship can generate tsunami-like waves. Such waves, generated by cruise ships, were observed in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Two distinct, long tsunami-like waves were measured, which were associated [...] Read more.
The displacement of a large amount of water in a moderate-sized estuary by a fast-moving mega-ship can generate tsunami-like waves. Such waves, generated by cruise ships, were observed in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Two distinct, long tsunami-like waves were measured, which were associated with the passage of a large cruise ship. The first wave had a period of 5.4 min and a height of 0.40 m near the shoreline. The second wave had a period of 2.5 min and was 0.23 m high. The peak velocity of the onshore flow during the second wave reached 0.65 m/s. The shorter, second wave propagated considerably faster than the first wave in the breaking zone. The measured wave celerity was less than 50% of the calculated values, using the shallow water approximation of the dispersion equation, suggesting that nonlinear effects play an important role. A fundamental similarity among the generation of tsunamis, as induced by mega-ships, landslides or earthquakes, is a process that causes a vertical velocity at the sea surface, where a freely propagating wave is produced. This mega-ship-generated tsunami provides a prototype field laboratory for systematically studying tsunami dynamics, particularly the strong turbulent flows associated with the breaking of a tsunami wave in the nearshore, and tsunami–land interactions. It also provides a realistic demonstration for public education, which is essential for the preparation and management of this unpreventable hazard. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modeling Waves Generated by Tsunamigenic Source)
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