Special Issue "Sea Surface Temperature: From Observation to Applications"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francisco Pastor Guzman
Website
Guest Editor
Meteorology and Pollutant Dynamics Area, Mediterranean Center for Environmental Studies (CEAM), Paterna, Valencia, Spain
Interests: climate change; climate extremes; SST; weather numerical modelling; extreme precipitation; atmosphere–ocean interaction; Mediterranean meteorology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a global and accelerated climate change environment, sea surface temperature (SST) was defined by the World Meteorological Organization as one of the essential climate variables that contribute to the characterization of the Earth’s climate. Recent studies confirmed that a huge amount of energy is being stored in the oceans; so, SST emerged as a proxy of this energy reservoir, especially to derive future trends in climate change and impacts on the frequency of weather extremes and their growing impact on human societies. This energy storage has a considerable impact on the atmosphere–ocean system through heat exchange. More attention is being paid to SST monitoring and analysis so that advances have been recorded in these fields.

As such, original research and review papers are welcome on the main subjects of sea surface temperature measurement techniques, data collection, and analysis. The main topics welcome in this special issue of JMSE include, but are not limited to:

  • SST measuring techniques, both in situ or remote sensing
  • Measuring SST: sensors technical development, measuring techniques
  • SST measurement networks: buoys, gliders, remote sensing, etc.
  • SST data treatment (gap data filling, neural networks, SST series reconstruction, etc.)
  • Remote sensing: measuring, validation
  • SST climate: variability, spatial distribution, trends
  • Impacts on marine biodiversity, aquaculture, and fisheries
  • Impacts on atmospheric phenomena, especially extremes
  • Teleconnection with climatic patterns
  • Physical and dynamical oceanography: correlation with sea level and salinity
  • SST and general ocean circulation
Dr. Francisco Pastor Guzman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SST
  • climate change
  • atmosphere–ocean interaction
  • in situ and remote sensing
  • measuring techniques
  • sensors
  • validation
  • time series
  • biodiversity
  • general oceanic circulation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Measuring Temperature in Coral Reef Environments: Experience, Lessons, and Results from Palau
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(9), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8090680 - 04 Sep 2020
Viewed by 551
Abstract
Sea surface temperature, determined remotely by satellite (SSST), measures only the thin “skin” of the ocean but is widely used to quantify the thermal regimes on coral reefs across the globe. In situ measurements of temperature complements global satellite sea surface temperature with [...] Read more.
Sea surface temperature, determined remotely by satellite (SSST), measures only the thin “skin” of the ocean but is widely used to quantify the thermal regimes on coral reefs across the globe. In situ measurements of temperature complements global satellite sea surface temperature with more accurate measurements at specific locations/depths on reefs and more detailed data. In 1999, an in situ temperature-monitoring network was started in the Republic of Palau after the 1998 coral bleaching event. Over two decades the network has grown to 70+ stations and 150+ instruments covering a 700 km wide geographic swath of the western Pacific dominated by multiple oceanic currents. The specific instruments used, depths, sampling intervals, precision, and accuracy are considered with two goals: to provide comprehensive general coverage to inform global considerations of temperature patterns/changes and to document the thermal dynamics of many specific habitats found within a highly diverse tropical marine location. Short-term in situ temperature monitoring may not capture broad patterns, particularly with regard to El Niño/La Niña cycles that produce extreme differences. Sampling over two decades has documented large T signals often invisible to SSST from (1) internal waves on time scales of minutes to hours, (2) El Niño on time scales of weeks to years, and (3) decadal-scale trends of +0.2 °C per decade. Network data have been used to create a regression model with SSST and sea surface height (SSH) capable of predicting depth-varying thermal stress. The large temporal, horizontal, and vertical variability noted by the network has further implications for thermal stress on the reef. There is a dearth of definitive thermal information for most coral reef habitats, which undermines the ability to interpret biological events from the most basic physical perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sea Surface Temperature: From Observation to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Satellite-Based Sea Surface Temperature to In Situ Observations Surrounding Coral Reefs in La Parguera, Puerto Rico
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(6), 453; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8060453 - 20 Jun 2020
Viewed by 730
Abstract
Coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse ecosystems on Earth. In the last few decades, a combination of stressors has produced significant declines in reef expanse, with declining reef health attributed largely to thermal stresses. We investigated the correspondence between time-series satellite [...] Read more.
Coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse ecosystems on Earth. In the last few decades, a combination of stressors has produced significant declines in reef expanse, with declining reef health attributed largely to thermal stresses. We investigated the correspondence between time-series satellite remote sensing-based sea surface temperature (SST) datasets and ocean temperature monitored in situ at depth in coral reefs near La Parguera, Puerto Rico. In situ temperature data were collected for Cayo Enrique and Cayo Mario, San Cristobal, and Margarita Reef. The three satellite-based SST datasets evaluated were NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch (CoralTemp), the UK Meteorological Office’s Operational SST and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA), and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (G1SST). All three satellite-based SST datasets assessed displayed a strong positive correlation (>0.91) with the in situ temperature measurements. However, all SST datasets underestimated the temperature, compared with the in situ measurements. A linear regression model using the SST datasets as the predictor for the in situ measurements produced an overall offset of ~1 °C for all three SST datasets. These results support the use of all three SST datasets, after offset correction, to represent the temperature regime at the depth of the corals in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sea Surface Temperature: From Observation to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Anomalous Oceanic Conditions in the Central and Eastern North Pacific Ocean during the 2014 Hurricane Season and Relationships to Three Major Hurricanes
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(4), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8040288 - 17 Apr 2020
Viewed by 959
Abstract
The 2014 Northeast Pacific hurricane season was highly active, with above-average intensity and frequency events, and a rare landfalling Hawaiian hurricane. We show that the anomalous northern extent of sea surface temperatures and anomalous vertical extent of upper ocean heat content above 26 [...] Read more.
The 2014 Northeast Pacific hurricane season was highly active, with above-average intensity and frequency events, and a rare landfalling Hawaiian hurricane. We show that the anomalous northern extent of sea surface temperatures and anomalous vertical extent of upper ocean heat content above 26 °C throughout the Northeast and Central Pacific Ocean may have influenced three long-lived tropical cyclones in July and August. Using a variety of satellite-observed and -derived products, we assess genesis conditions, along-track intensity, and basin-wide anomalous upper ocean heat content during Hurricanes Genevieve, Iselle, and Julio. The anomalously northern surface position of the 26 °C isotherm beyond 30° N to the north and east of the Hawaiian Islands in 2014 created very high sea surface temperatures throughout much of the Central Pacific. Analysis of basin-wide mean conditions confirm higher-than-average storm activity during strong positive oceanic thermal anomalies. Positive anomalies of 15–50 kJ cm−2 in the along-track upper ocean heat content for these three storms were observed during the intensification phase prior to peak intensity, advocating for greater understanding of the ocean thermal profile during tropical cyclone genesis and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sea Surface Temperature: From Observation to Applications)
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