Special Issue "Radar Technology for Coastal Areas and Open Sea Monitoring"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Giovanni Ludeno

Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA) - National Research Council of Italy (CNR) Napoli, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ocean monitoring; radar imaging; surface waves; ocean engineering; inverse problems; coastal bathymetry, microwave tomography
Guest Editor
Dr. Marco Uttieri

Department of Integrative Marine Ecology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: zooplankton ecology; behaviour; individual-based models; alien species; HF coastal radars; coastal circulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Monitoring oceans and coastal areas has a fundamental social impact and this scenario is made still more challenging with regard to the present and future issues related to climate change. In this context, radar systems have gained increasing interest, since they are remote sensing devices capable of providing information about sea waves, currents, tides, bathymetry, and wind. Moreover, radar systems can be designed to perform both large-scale and small-scale monitoring, with different spatial and temporal resolutions, and can be installed on different observation platforms (ship-based, ground-based, airborne, satellite or drones).

The Special Issue aims at engendering a virtual forum for ocean radar researchers where state-of-the-art methodologies and applications concerning ocean monitoring are reviewed and discussed. Possible topics for the Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • radar system design;
  • signal processing;
  • ocean dynamics;
  • open sea and coastal areas monitoring;
  • physical–biological interactions;
  • sea safety and protection.

Dr. Giovanni Ludeno
Dr. Marco Uttieri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • radars
  • remote sensing
  • ocean and coastal monitoring
  • ecological applications of radars
  • signal processing
  • ocean radar system design
  • coastal areas safety and protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Automatic Shoreline Position and Intertidal Foreshore Slope Detection from X-Band Radar Images Using Modified Temporal Waterline Method with Corrected Wave Run-up
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7020045
Received: 22 December 2018 / Revised: 7 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
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Abstract
Automatic and accurate shoreline position and intertidal foreshore slope detection are challenging and significantly important for coastal dynamics. In the present study, a time series shoreline position and intertidal foreshore slope have been automatically detected using modified Temporal Waterline Method (mTWM) from time-averaged [...] Read more.
Automatic and accurate shoreline position and intertidal foreshore slope detection are challenging and significantly important for coastal dynamics. In the present study, a time series shoreline position and intertidal foreshore slope have been automatically detected using modified Temporal Waterline Method (mTWM) from time-averaged X-band radar images captured throughout the course of two-week tidal cycle variation over an area spanning 5.6 km on the Hasaki coast between 12 April 2005 and 31 December 2008. The methodology is based on the correlation map between the pixel intensity variation of the time-averaged X-band radar images and the binary signal of the tide level ranging from −0.8 m to 0.8 m. In order to ensure the binary signal represented each of the water levels in the intertidal shore profile, determining the water level direction-wise bottom elevation is considered as the modification. Random gaps were detected in the captured images owing to the unclear or oversaturation of the waterline signal. A horizontal shift in the detected shoreline positions was observed compared to the survey data previously collected at Hasaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS). This horizontal shift can be attributed to wave breaking and high wave conditions. Wave set-up and run-up are the effects of wave breaking and high wave conditions, respectively. The correction of the wave set-up and run-up is considered to allow the upward shift of the water level position, as well as shoreline position, to the landward direction. The findings indicate that the shoreline positions derived by mTWM with the corrected wave run-up reasonably agree with the survey data. The mean absolute bias (MAB) between the survey data and the shoreline positions detected using mTWM with the corrected wave run-up is approximately 5.9 m, which is theoretically smaller than the spatial resolution of the radar measurements. The random gaps in the mTWM-derived shoreline positions are filled by Garcia’s data filling algorithm which is a Penalized Least Squares regression method by means of the Discrete Cosine Transform (PLS-DCT). The MAB between survey data and the gap filled shoreline positions detected using TWM with corrected wave run-up is approximately 5.9 m. The obtained results indicate the accuracy of the mTWM with corrected wave run-up integrated with Garcia’s method compared to the survey observations. The executed approach in this study is considered as an efficient and robust tool to automatically detect shoreline positions and intertidal foreshore slopes extracted from X-band radar images with the consideration of wave run-up correction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radar Technology for Coastal Areas and Open Sea Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle Long-Term Monitoring of the Atlantic Jet through the Strait of Gibraltar with HF Radar Observations
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7010003
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
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Abstract
The present work focuses on the long-term coastal monitoring of the Atlantic surface inflow into the Mediterranean basin through the Strait of Gibraltar. Hourly current maps provided during 2016–2017 by a High Frequency radar (HFR) system were used to characterize the Atlantic Jet [...] Read more.
The present work focuses on the long-term coastal monitoring of the Atlantic surface inflow into the Mediterranean basin through the Strait of Gibraltar. Hourly current maps provided during 2016–2017 by a High Frequency radar (HFR) system were used to characterize the Atlantic Jet (AJ) since changes in its speed and direction modulate the upper-layer circulation of the Western Alboran Gyre (WAG). The AJ pattern was observed to follow a marked seasonal cycle. A stronger AJ flowed north-eastwards during autumn and winter, while a weaker AJ was directed more southwardly during the middle of the year, reaching a minimum of intensity during summertime. A strong relationship between AJ speeds and angles was evidenced: the AJ appeared to be frequently locked at an angle around 63°, measured clockwise from the North. The AJ speed usually fluctuated between 50 cm·s−1 and 170 cm·s−1, with occasional drops below 50 cm·s−1 which were coincident with abrupt modifications in AJ orientation. Peaks of current speed clearly reached values up to 250 cm·s−1, regardless of the season. A number of persistent full reversal episodes of the surface inflow were analyzed in terms of triggering synoptic conditions and the related wind-driven circulation patterns. High sea level pressures and intense (above 10 m·s−1), permanent and spatially-uniform easterlies prevailed over the study domain during the AJ collapse events analyzed. By contrast, tides seemed to play a secondary role by partially speeding up or slowing down the westward currents, depending on the phase of the tide. A detailed characterization of this unusual phenomenon in the Strait of Gibraltar is relevant from diverse aspects, encompassing search and rescue operations, the management of accidental marine pollution episodes or efficient ship routing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radar Technology for Coastal Areas and Open Sea Monitoring)
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J. Mar. Sci. Eng. EISSN 2077-1312 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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