Special Issue "Coastal Flood Risk Reduction"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jeremy D. Bricker
Website
Guest Editor
Delft University of Technology, Dept. of Hydraulic Engineering
Interests: hydraulic and coastal engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Celso M. Ferreira
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering, George Mason University, VA 22030, USA
Interests: Flood Hazards Engineering and Resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a world of rising seas and intensifying storms, coastal cities face extreme flood risk. In some areas, this takes the form of nuisance flooding during king tides, while in other areas, it means gambling with the threat of obliteration due to storm surge or tsunamis. Engineers, scientists, and planners propose a variety of measures to mitigate these risks. Traditional solutions such as seawalls and coastal embankments, nature-based solutions such as wetland restoration and sandy foreshores, and social solutions including land use zoning, retreat, and evacuation plans all have their respective benefits and limitations. This Special Issue welcomes papers that address any and all of these issues.

Dr. Jeremy D. Bricker
Dr. Celso M. Ferriera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • storm surge
  • waves
  • tsunami
  • flood
  • hurricane
  • typhoon
  • damage
  • mitigation
  • adaptation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nearshore Topographical Changes and Coastal Stability in Nam Dinh Province, Vietnam
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(10), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8100755 - 27 Sep 2020
Abstract
Recently, the coastal zone in Vietnam has experienced more intensive sea attacks due to severe typhoons, climate change, and humsection an activities. Sea level rise has been recorded all along the coast. Moreover, sand exploitation and engineering measures have significantly changed local reliefs [...] Read more.
Recently, the coastal zone in Vietnam has experienced more intensive sea attacks due to severe typhoons, climate change, and humsection an activities. Sea level rise has been recorded all along the coast. Moreover, sand exploitation and engineering measures have significantly changed local reliefs and led to apparent sea water level change on the coast of Nam Dinh province. Coastal erosion and sea dike failures have become a serious problem in the region. The site investigation of nearshore topography shows the recent changes to the coast. Hydrodynamic models show that changes of relief and increased wave attacks on dikes. The main reason for sea dike instability is soil erosion due to wave topping; meanwhile, the dikes are stable in terms of sliding. The coast should be reinforced with properly constructed revetments, wave topping preventive measures, and nearshore sand exploitation should be halted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Flood Risk Reduction)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Storm Surge Barrier Protection in an Era of Accelerating Sea-Level Rise: Quantifying Closure Frequency, Duration and Trapped River Flooding
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(9), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8090725 - 20 Sep 2020
Abstract
Gated storm surge barriers are being studied by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for coastal storm risk management for the New York City metropolitan area. Surge barrier gates are only closed when storm tides exceeding a specific “trigger” water level [...] Read more.
Gated storm surge barriers are being studied by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for coastal storm risk management for the New York City metropolitan area. Surge barrier gates are only closed when storm tides exceeding a specific “trigger” water level might occur in a storm. Gate closure frequency and duration both strongly influence the physical and environmental effects on enclosed estuaries. In this paper, we use historical observations to represent future storm tide hazard, and we superimpose local relative sea-level rise (SLR) to study the potential future changes to closure frequency and duration. We account for the effects of forecast uncertainty on closures, using a relationship between past storm surge and forecast uncertainty from an operational ensemble forecast system. A concern during a storm surge is that closed gates will trap river streamflow and could cause a new problem with trapped river water flooding. Similarly, we evaluate this possibility using historical data to represent river flood hazard, complemented by hydrodynamic model simulations to capture how waters rise when a hypothetical barrier is closed. The results show that SLR causes an exponential increase of the gate closure frequency, a lengthening of the closure duration, and a rising probability of trapped river water flooding. The USACE has proposed to prevent these SLR-driven increases by periodically raising the trigger water level (e.g., to match a prescribed storm return period). However, this alternative management approach for dealing with SLR requires waterfront seawalls to be raised at a high, and ongoing, additional future expense. For seawalls, costs and benefits will likely need to be weighed on a neighborhood-by-neighborhood basis, and in some cases retreat or other non-structural options may be preferable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Flood Risk Reduction)
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