Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2020) | Viewed by 13506

Special Issue Editor

School of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
Interests: coastal hydraulics; wave mechanics; tsunamis; storm surges; sediment transport; numerical modeling; coastal hazards; oil spill modeling; climate changes; artificial neural networks; parallel computation; GPU-accelerated modeling; immersive modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the shallow coastal region, fluid flows often exhibit complicated behaviors strongly connected to physical effects, such as turbulence, wave–structure interaction, wave–current interaction, wave breaking, pycnocline, and thermocline. The resulting complex motion of waves typically spawns issues in coastal hazards and environmental impacts; a notable example is huge and turbulent whirlpool generated inside the harbor during a tsunami event. As the prediction of such complex phenomena requires dedicated considerations of the controlling physics, unveiling them is still recognized as important and is thus a popular topic in coastal and ocean engineering. Therefore, recent research is still leaning towards a better understanding of coastal hydrodynamic processes, which tend to be highly complex and turbulence-dominant.

In this Special Issue, we invite high quality research papers on various topics related to complex nearshore hydrodynamics, including but not limited to:

  • Multiscale, multiphysics phenomena;
  • Advanced/new modeling approaches;
  • Sediment transport mechanism;
  • Coastal hazards by tsunamis/storm surges;
  • Turbulent mixing in nearshore scale;
  • Pollutant advection–dispersion;
  • Generation and evolution of infra-gravity waves.
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sangyoung Son
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nearshore hydrodynamics
  • Numerical modeling
  • Physical modeling
  • Coastal erosion
  • Tsunamis
  • Storm surges
  • Turbulent mixing
  • Pollutant dispersion

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 24460 KiB  
Article
Modeling of Accidental Oil Spills at Different Phases of LNG Terminal Construction
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(4), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9040392 - 07 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1772
Abstract
Accidental oil spills not only deteriorate biodiversity but also cause immediate threats to coastal environments. This study quantitatively investigates the initial dispersion of spilled oil using the environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) model, loosely coupled with an endorsed oil spill model (MEDSLIK-II) accounting [...] Read more.
Accidental oil spills not only deteriorate biodiversity but also cause immediate threats to coastal environments. This study quantitatively investigates the initial dispersion of spilled oil using the environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) model, loosely coupled with an endorsed oil spill model (MEDSLIK-II) accounting for time-dependent advection, diffusion, and physiochemical weathering of the surface oil slick. Focusing on local contributing factors (i.e., construction activities) to oil dispersion, the current model is applied to likely oil spills occurring at three different phases of the Songdo LNG terminal construction on a reclaimed site in South Korea. Applied phases pose detailed ship collision scenarios generated based on a proposed construction plan of the terminal. The effects of permeable revetments, required for reclamation, on the currents were also investigated and applied in subsequent oil spill modeling. For each scenario, the simulated results showed distinct patterns in the advection, dispersion, and transformation of the oil slick. Oil absorption into the coast, which causes immense damage to the coastal communities, is found to be highly dependent on the tidal currents, volume of oil spilled, and nearby construction activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research)
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24 pages, 8014 KiB  
Article
Transformation of Infragravity Waves during Hurricane Overwash
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(8), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8080545 - 22 Jul 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2265
Abstract
Infragravity (IG) waves are expected to contribute significantly to coastal flooding and sediment transport during hurricane overwash, yet the dynamics of these low-frequency waves during hurricane impact remain poorly documented and understood. This paper utilizes hydrodynamic measurements collected during Hurricane Harvey (2017) across [...] Read more.
Infragravity (IG) waves are expected to contribute significantly to coastal flooding and sediment transport during hurricane overwash, yet the dynamics of these low-frequency waves during hurricane impact remain poorly documented and understood. This paper utilizes hydrodynamic measurements collected during Hurricane Harvey (2017) across a low-lying barrier-island cut (Texas, U.S.A.) during sea-to-bay directed flow (i.e., overwash). IG waves were observed to propagate across the island for a period of five hours, superimposed on and depth modulated by very-low frequency storm-driven variability in water level (5.6 min to 2.8 h periods). These sea-level anomalies are hypothesized to be meteotsunami initiated by tropical cyclone rainbands. Estimates of IG energy flux show that IG energy was largely reduced across the island (79–86%) and the magnitude of energy loss was greatest for the lowest-frequency IG waves (<0.01 Hz). Using multitaper bispectral analysis, it is shown that, during overwash, nonlinear triad interactions on the sea-side of the barrier island result in energy transfer from the low-frequency IG peak to bound harmonics at high IG frequencies (>0.01 Hz). Assuming this pattern of nonlinear energy exchange persists across the wide and downward sloping barrier-island cut, it likely contributes to the observed frequency-dependence of cross-barrier IG energy losses during this relatively low surge event (<1 m). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research)
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13 pages, 3274 KiB  
Article
On the Separation Period Discriminating Gravity and Infragravity Waves off Gyeongpo Beach, Korea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(3), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030167 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3078
Abstract
Although there have been a number of studies investigating fundamental characteristics of infragravity waves in coastal zones, a proper method of deciding period ranges that are associated with gravity or infragravity waves remains uncertain. In this study, we proposed an empirical method of [...] Read more.
Although there have been a number of studies investigating fundamental characteristics of infragravity waves in coastal zones, a proper method of deciding period ranges that are associated with gravity or infragravity waves remains uncertain. In this study, we proposed an empirical method of separating spectral energies of gravity and infragravity waves by analyzing the wave observation data acquired off Gyeongpo beach on the Korean east coast. The fundamental principle of the suggested method is to represent the separation period discriminating gravity and infragravity waves as a function of the significant wave period, rather than a fixed value that was conventionally applied in previous studies. As a consequence of using the new method, the relationships between heights and periods of gravity and infragravity waves were more clearly identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research)
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21 pages, 5196 KiB  
Article
Nearshore Waves and Littoral Drift Along a Micro-Tidal Wave-Dominated Coast Having Comparable Wind-Sea and Swell Energy
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8010055 - 18 Jan 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3087
Abstract
The nearshore wave characteristics and variations in littoral drift (longshore sediment transport; LST) are estimated based on different approaches for four years along the Vengurla coast, with comparable wind-sea and swell energy assessed. The waverider buoy-measured data at 15 m water depth is [...] Read more.
The nearshore wave characteristics and variations in littoral drift (longshore sediment transport; LST) are estimated based on different approaches for four years along the Vengurla coast, with comparable wind-sea and swell energy assessed. The waverider buoy-measured data at 15 m water depth is utilized as the input wave parameters along with the reanalysis model data, and the numerical wave model Delft-3D is used for estimating the nearshore wave parameters. The relative contribution of wind-seas and swells on LST rates are specifically examined. The clear prevalence of west-southwest waves implies the prevalence of south to north longshore sediment transport with net transport varying from 0.19–0.37 × 105 m3/yr. LST is strongly dependent on the breaker angle and a small change in the wave direction substantially alters the LST, and hence reanalysis/model data with coarse resolutions produce large errors (~38%) in the LST estimate. The annual gross LST rate based on integral wave parameters is only 58% considering the wind-seas and swells separately, since the wind-sea energy is comparable to swell energy, and the direction of these two systems differs significantly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research)
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16 pages, 9052 KiB  
Article
Infragravity Wave Energy Partitioning in the Surf Zone in Response to Wind-Sea and Swell Forcing
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(11), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7110383 - 28 Oct 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2641
Abstract
An alongshore array of pressure sensors and a cross-shore array of current velocity and pressure sensors were deployed on a barred beach in southwestern Australia to estimate the relative response of edge waves and leaky waves to variable incident wind wave conditions. The [...] Read more.
An alongshore array of pressure sensors and a cross-shore array of current velocity and pressure sensors were deployed on a barred beach in southwestern Australia to estimate the relative response of edge waves and leaky waves to variable incident wind wave conditions. The strong sea breeze cycle at the study site (wind speeds frequently > 10 m s−1) produced diurnal variations in the peak frequency of the incident waves, with wind sea conditions (periods 2 to 8 s) dominating during the peak of the sea breeze and swell (periods 8 to 20 s) dominating during times of low wind. We observed that edge wave modes and their frequency distribution varied with the frequency of the short-wave forcing (swell or wind-sea) and edge waves were more energetic than leaky waves for the duration of the 10-day experiment. While the total infragravity energy in the surf zone was higher during swell forcing, edge waves were more energetic during wind-sea periods. However, low-frequency (0.005–0.023 Hz) edge waves were found to be dominant in absence of wind-sea conditions, while higher-frequency (0.023–0.050 Hz) edge waves dominated when wind-sea conditions were present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nearshore Hydrodynamics Research)
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