Special Issue "Biocomplexity and Microbial Diversity in a Marine System"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maria Blažina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Marine Research, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Rovinj-Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: lipids; biogeochemical cycling; microbial ecology; microalgae biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting you to submit a manuscript to the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering for a Special issue on “Biocomplexity and Microbial Diversity in a Marine System”. As the dominant life form in oceans, microbes play fundamental roles in biogeochemical processes and ecosystem equilibrium maintenance on both the microniche and global scales. Studies reveal that the free-living microbes inhabiting the open ocean as well as those intimately associated with their hosts play a pivotal role in ecosystem dynamics, altering critical functions of the associated biota in a mutualistic or antagonistic way. Changing environmental conditions, such as those concerning ocean chemistry, in particular, rising anthropogenic CO2, pH decline, rising temperature, and eutrophication, leads to the development of diverse adaptation strategies, including physiological and metabolic modifications and shifts in the very structure of microbial communities. The resilience of marine microorganisms to environmental pressures, i.e., toxicity and mutagenicity, has been evolving for over 3 billion years. However, little is known about the interrelation of microbial diversity and physiological functionality. Recent advances in biochemistry, molecular biology, recombinant biotechnology, remote- and nano- sensing, and related cutting-edge technological solutions have set new horizons and opportunities for novel industrial applications of the wealth of naturally occurring defense, adaptation, and proliferation mechanisms. Authors are encouraged to submit original research articles covering areas of marine microbial ecology, physiology, ecotoxicology, and methodological improvements that contribute to our better understanding of the biocomplexity of microbial populations and ecosystem plasticity.

Dr. Maria Blažina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine microbial diversity
  • biocomplexity
  • ecosystem plasticity
  • microbial physiology
  • next generation techniques
  • ocean acidification
  • eutrophication

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Diversity of Epiphytic Bacterial Communities Associated with Adriatic Fucacean Species Phycosphere
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(12), 967; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8120967 - 26 Nov 2020
Viewed by 508
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between membrane-regulating functional lipids of three fucacean species and their associated epiphytic bacterial communities. The analyzed algae Treptacantha barbata, Carpodesmia crinita and Cystoseira compressa, formerly classified under the Cystoseira genus, are [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between membrane-regulating functional lipids of three fucacean species and their associated epiphytic bacterial communities. The analyzed algae Treptacantha barbata, Carpodesmia crinita and Cystoseira compressa, formerly classified under the Cystoseira genus, are indigenous to the Adriatic Sea. The thalli of sampled Fucales species were divided into perennial and annual parts. T. barbata and C. crinita show high contents of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids but, however, show a clear distinction between branches, cauloids and apical parts. Along with the highest unsaturation degree (4.32), the C. crinita branches and apical parts demonstrated high proportion of both C18 and C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, with eicosapentaenoic (C20:5 n-3) and arachidonic (C20:4 n-6) fatty acids up to 5.46% and 13.82%, respectively. The highest proportion of saturated fatty acids was found in thalli of C. compressa, particularly on cauloids and old branches (≥90%). The similarity profile routine analysis of fatty acids and microbial community structure has shown clear separation of the cauloids and apical parts from the branches of C. crinita and T. barbata. Based on the nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis several representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria class, identified as Vibrionales (Vibrio), Cellvibrionales and Xanthomonadales, which contributed strongly to the separation of T. barbata apical parts and branches, C. compressa receptacles and C. crinita branches from the T. barbata cauloids and C. crinita apical parts and cauloids. The highest richness in polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular C18:3(n-3), C20:4(n-6) and C20:5(n-3), was observed on branches, accompanied by a distinctive epiphytic microbial structure dominated by numerous representatives with potentially beneficial biological activity. The results showed a strong relationship between fatty acid profiles of the analyzed species and phycosphere community structure, underlining the host physiological condition in shaping the biological interactions and maintaining a healthy microbiome, as well as compiling the ecophysiological and molecular research in order to better assess the resilience of the ecosystem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocomplexity and Microbial Diversity in a Marine System)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Five TRIzol-Based Protein Preparation Methods for 2-DE Production From Challenging Marine Dinoflagellate Samples: A Case Study on Two Benthic Prorocentrum Species
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(5), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8050363 - 21 May 2020
Viewed by 606
Abstract
Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a major element of conventional gel-based proteomics, which resolves complex protein mixtures. Protein extraction with the removal of interfering substances from the sample remains the key to producing high-quality 2-DE profiles. Marine dinoflagellates contain large endogenous amounts of [...] Read more.
Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a major element of conventional gel-based proteomics, which resolves complex protein mixtures. Protein extraction with the removal of interfering substances from the sample remains the key to producing high-quality 2-DE profiles. Marine dinoflagellates contain large endogenous amounts of salts, nucleic acids, polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, pigments, and other interfering compounds. These substances are detrimental to the quality of gel images. Protein preparation using TRIzol reagent is a promising method for producing high-quality 2-DE profiles for dinoflagellate samples. In addition to its remarkable performance, the TRIzol method’s several advantages have made it a popular and widely used method in the field of 2-DE sample preparation. Nonetheless, the quality of 2-DE of samples from certain dinoflagellate species is not as high as previously reported when the same TRIzol protocol is applied. Therefore, modifications to the original TRIzol method are required to remove interfering substances from those challenging dinoflagellate samples. In this study, the original TRIzol method and four modified methods, namely the aliquot TRIzol method, re-TRIzol method, TRIzol method with a commercial clean-up kit, and TRIzol method with trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitation, were compared. Performance of these five methods in terms of protein yield, background signal, and resolution and number of protein spots was investigated on samples from two benthic Prorocentrum species: P. lima and P. hoffmannianum. Our results demonstrated that high-quality 2-DE could be achieved from P. lima samples prepared using both the original TRIzol method and the TRIzol method with a commercial clean-up kit. However, the original TRIzol method failed to produce high-quality 2-DE profiles for P. hoffmannianum samples. Among the four modified TRIzol methods, only the TRIzol method with a commercial clean-up kit could yield substantially improved high-quality 2-DE profiles for P. hoffmannianum samples. This combination of the conventional TRIzol method with a commercial clean-up kit potentially represents a promising protein extraction methodology for obtaining high-quality 2-DE profiles for difficult dinoflagellate samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocomplexity and Microbial Diversity in a Marine System)
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