Special Issue "Advances in Marine Engineering: Geological Environment and Hazards II"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Geological Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2023 | Viewed by 1584

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xiaolei Liu
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Guest Editor
Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Geological Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
Interests: marine engineering geology; wave-seabed interactions; submarine sediment gravity flows; seafloor in-situ test and observation
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Prof. Dr. Thorsten Stoesser
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; coastal hydraulics and environmental fluid mechanics
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Dr. Xingsen Guo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: marine engineering geology and geotechnical engineering; marine geological hazards; computational fluid dynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the continuous advancement of coastal, offshore, and deep-sea engineering construction (marine resource development, offshore wind power projects, etc.), research on marine geological environments and hazards has gradually deepened and many research advances have been achieved. Therefore, this Special Issue has been organized by Prof. Xiaolei Liu, Prof. Thorsten Stoesser, and Dr. Xingsen Guo to document these research advances. The objective of this Special Issue is to collect research papers in the field of marine geological environments and hazards, including geological environments, geological hazards, engineering geology, hydrodynamics, fluid environments, and geotechnical engineering. This Special Issue invites contributions comprising in situ observations, indoor tests, numerical simulations, and theoretical analyses on marine geological environments and hazards. Contributions may also include case studies, review articles, or short communications.

Prof. Dr. Xiaolei Liu
Prof. Dr. Thorsten Stoesser
Dr. Xingsen Guo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine geological environment
  • marine geological hazards
  • marine engineering geology
  • marine hydrodynamics
  • marine environment fluid
  • marine geotechnical engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Experimental Investigation on the Cyclic Shear Mechanical Characteristics and Dynamic Response of a Steel–Silt Interface in the Yellow River Delta
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(1), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11010223 - 15 Jan 2023
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Abstract
The shear behavior and dynamic response of a steel–silt interface are significant for the safety and stability of offshore structures in the Yellow River Delta. A series of steel–silt interface cyclic shear tests under constant normal load conditions (CNL) were carried out to [...] Read more.
The shear behavior and dynamic response of a steel–silt interface are significant for the safety and stability of offshore structures in the Yellow River Delta. A series of steel–silt interface cyclic shear tests under constant normal load conditions (CNL) were carried out to explore the effects of normal stress, shear amplitude, roughness, and water content on the interface shear strength, shear stiffness, and damping ratio using a large interface shear apparatus. The preliminary results showed that the amplitude of normal stress and shear amplitude affected the interface’s shear strength, stiffness, and damping ratio in a dominant manner. The roughness and water content were also crucial factors impacting the rule of shear strength, shear stiffness, and damping ratio, changing with the number of cycles. Under various scenarios, the steel–silt interface weakened distinctively, and the energy dissipation tended to be asymptotic with the cyclic shear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Marine Engineering: Geological Environment and Hazards II)
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Article
A Case Study Assessing the Liquefaction Hazards of Silt Sediments Based on the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio Method
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(1), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11010104 - 04 Jan 2023
Viewed by 475
Abstract
Silt liquefaction can occur due to the rapid cyclic loading of sediments. This can result in the loss of the bearing capacity of the underlying sediments and damage to the foundations and infrastructure. Therefore, assessing liquefaction hazards is an important aspect of disaster [...] Read more.
Silt liquefaction can occur due to the rapid cyclic loading of sediments. This can result in the loss of the bearing capacity of the underlying sediments and damage to the foundations and infrastructure. Therefore, assessing liquefaction hazards is an important aspect of disaster prevention and risk assessment in geologically unstable areas. The purpose of this study is to assess the liquefaction hazards of silt sediments by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio method. Single-station noise recording was carried out in the northern plain of the Yellow River Delta, and a new method was adopted to identify the fundamental frequency. The dynamic parameters of the silt, such as the fundamental frequency, amplification, and vulnerability index, were used as indicators to assess the liquefaction potential. The results show that the silty soils in different areas have different stable ranges of values of the fundamental frequency. Moreover, the distribution of the observations is in good agreement with the geological conditions in the area, which indicates the potential applicability and reliability of the new method for identifying fundamental frequency. The vulnerability index is inversely related to the fundamental frequency, with the southwestern part of the study area having a lower fundamental frequency and a higher vulnerability index, meaning a greater liquefaction risk compared to other areas. The horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio method has great advantages in characterizing subsurface dynamic parameters and can be applied to liquefaction hazard assessments of silt sediments in large areas, which is critically important in terms of providing information and guidance for urban construction and planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Marine Engineering: Geological Environment and Hazards II)
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Article
Stability Characteristics of Horizontal Wells in the Exploitation of Hydrate-Bearing Clayey-Silt Sediments
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(12), 1935; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10121935 - 07 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 424
Abstract
The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing strata in clayey-silt sediments are significantly different from those of either conventional reservoirs or hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, which poses great challenges for wellbore stability analyses. The stability characteristics of a deviated borehole during drilling in hydrate-bearing clayey-silt sediments [...] Read more.
The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing strata in clayey-silt sediments are significantly different from those of either conventional reservoirs or hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, which poses great challenges for wellbore stability analyses. The stability characteristics of a deviated borehole during drilling in hydrate-bearing clayey-silt sediments (HBS-CS) remain to be studied. In this paper, an analysis of the wellbore stability characteristics of a deviated borehole using the Mohr–Coulomb (M-C) criterion and Drucker–Prager (D-P) criterion was carried out based on the elastic stress distribution model of the surrounding strata of the wellbore and the triaxial shear tests of the HBS-CS. The results imply that the collapse pressure and safety density window are symmetrically distributed with deviation angle and azimuth. Considering the effect of hydrate decomposition, the collapse pressure gradient could become higher and the instability risks would be amplified. Considering the combined effects of collapse, fracture pressure gradient, and the safety density window, it is suggested that the borehole be arranged along an azimuth of 60–120°, which could greatly reduce the risk in a drilling operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Marine Engineering: Geological Environment and Hazards II)
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