Special Issue "Anniversary Feature Papers"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Steven Y. Liang

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-404-247-3503
Interests: Precision Machining, Analysis of Manufacturing Processes, Materials and Manufacturing, Process Mechanics and Materials Mechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing, I am pleased to announce this Special Issue, entitled "Anniversary Feature Papers". This Special Issue will be a collection of articles from Editorial Board Members and Leading Researchers discussing new knowledge or new cutting-edge developments in the science of manufacturing and materials processing.

Our goal is to provide fast dissemination of new research results and ideas, and to stimulate research groups to create new studies, innovations and knowledge without delay.

You are welcome to send a title and abstract to our Editorial Office ([email protected]) for evaluation. Alternatively, you are welcome to submit full papers of your recent research outcomes within the scope of JMMP. All contributions will be peer-reviewed.

Prof. Dr. Steven Y. Liang
Editor-in-Chief

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Finite Element Modeling of Orthogonal Machining of Brittle Materials Using an Embedded Cohesive Element Mesh
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3020036
Received: 6 April 2019 / Revised: 21 April 2019 / Accepted: 29 April 2019 / Published: 2 May 2019
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Abstract
Machining of brittle materials is common in the manufacturing industry, but few modeling techniques are available to predict materials’ behavior in response to the cutting tool. The paper presents a fracture-based finite element model, named embedded cohesive zone–finite element method (ECZ–FEM). In ECZ–FEM, [...] Read more.
Machining of brittle materials is common in the manufacturing industry, but few modeling techniques are available to predict materials’ behavior in response to the cutting tool. The paper presents a fracture-based finite element model, named embedded cohesive zone–finite element method (ECZ–FEM). In ECZ–FEM, a network of cohesive zone (CZ) elements are embedded in the material body with regular elements to capture multiple randomized cracks during a cutting process. The CZ element is defined by the fracture energy and a scaling factor to control material ductility and chip behavior. The model is validated by an experimental study in terms of chip formation and cutting force with two different brittle materials and depths of cut. The results show that ECZ–FEM can capture various chip forms, such as dusty debris, irregular chips, and unstable crack propagation seen in the experimental cases. For the cutting force, the model can predict the relative difference among the experimental cases, but the force value is higher by 30–50%. The ECZ–FEM has demonstrated the feasibility of brittle cutting simulation with some limitations applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Laser Powder Bed Fusion Processing Using a Combination of Melt Pool Modeling and Design of Experiment Approaches: Density Control
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3010021
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 4 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4093 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A simplified analytical model of the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) process was used to develop a novel density prediction approach that can be adapted for any given powder feedstock and LPBF system. First, calibration coupons were built using IN625, Ti64 and Fe [...] Read more.
A simplified analytical model of the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) process was used to develop a novel density prediction approach that can be adapted for any given powder feedstock and LPBF system. First, calibration coupons were built using IN625, Ti64 and Fe powders and a specific LPBF system. These coupons were manufactured using the predetermined ranges of laser power, scanning speed, hatching space, and layer thickness, and their densities were measured using conventional material characterization techniques. Next, a simplified melt pool model was used to calculate the melt pool dimensions for the selected sets of printing parameters. Both sets of data were then combined to predict the density of printed parts. This approach was additionally validated using the literature data on AlSi10Mg and 316L alloys, thus demonstrating that it can reliably be used to optimize the laser powder bed metal fusion process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Five-Axis Machine Tool Coordinate Metrology Evaluation Using the Ball Dome Artefact Before and After Machine Calibration
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3010020
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 3 February 2019
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Abstract
Now equipped with touch trigger probes machine tools are increasingly used to measure workpieces for various tasks such as rapid setup, compensation of final tool paths to correct part deflections and even verify conformity to finished tolerances. On five-axis machine tools, the use [...] Read more.
Now equipped with touch trigger probes machine tools are increasingly used to measure workpieces for various tasks such as rapid setup, compensation of final tool paths to correct part deflections and even verify conformity to finished tolerances. On five-axis machine tools, the use of data acquired for different rotary axes positions angles brings additional errors into play, thus increasing the measurement errors. The estimation of the machine geometric error sources, using such methods as the scale and master ball artefact (SAMBA) method, and their use to calibrate machine tools may enhance five-axis on-machine metrology. The paper presents the use of the ball dome artefact to validate the accuracy improvement when using a calibrated model to process the machine tool axis readings. The inter-axis errors and the scale gain errors were targeted for correction as well the measuring tool length and lateral offsets. Worst case and mean deviations between the reference artefact geometry and the on-machine tool measurement is reduced from 176 and 70 µm down to 31 and 12 µm for the nominal and calibrated machine stylus tip offsets respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Flexible Abrasive Tools for the Deburring and Finishing of Holes in Superalloys
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040082
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3316 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many manufacturing sectors require high surface finishing. After machining operations such as milling or drilling, undesirable burrs or insufficient edge finishing may be generated. For decades, many finishing processes have been on a handmade basis; this fact is accentuated when dealing with complex [...] Read more.
Many manufacturing sectors require high surface finishing. After machining operations such as milling or drilling, undesirable burrs or insufficient edge finishing may be generated. For decades, many finishing processes have been on a handmade basis; this fact is accentuated when dealing with complex geometries especially for high value-added parts. In recent years, there has been a tendency towards trying to automate these kinds of processes as far as possible, with repeatability and time/money savings being the main purposes. Based on this idea, the aim of this work was to check new tools and strategies for finishing aeronautical parts, especially critical engine parts made from Inconel 718, a very ductile nickel alloy. Automating the edge finishing of chamfered holes is a complicated but very important goal. In this paper, flexible abrasive tools were used for this purpose. A complete study of different abrasive possibilities was carried out, mainly focusing on roughness analysis and the final edge results obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation on Product and Process Fingerprints for Integrated Quality Assurance in Injection Molding of Microstructured Biochips
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040079
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 15 November 2018
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Abstract
Injection molding has been increasing for decades its share in the production of polymer components, in comparison to other manufacturing processes, as it can assure a cost-efficient production while maintaining short cycle times. In any production line, the stability of the process and [...] Read more.
Injection molding has been increasing for decades its share in the production of polymer components, in comparison to other manufacturing processes, as it can assure a cost-efficient production while maintaining short cycle times. In any production line, the stability of the process and the quality of the produced components is ensured by frequently performed metrological controls, which require a significant amount of effort and resources. To avoid the expensive effect of an out of tolerance production, an alternative method to intensive metrology efforts to process stability and part quality monitoring is presented in this article. The proposed method is based on the extraction of process and product fingerprints from the process regulating signals and the replication quality of dedicated features positioned on the injection molded component, respectively. The features used for this purpose are placed on the runner of the moldings and are similar or equal to those actually in the part, in order to assess the quality of the produced plastic parts. For the purpose of studying the method’s viability, a study case based on the production of polymer microfluidic systems for bio-analytics medical applications was selected. A statistically designed experiment was utilized in order to assess the sensitivity of the polymer biochip’s micro features (μ-pillars) replication fidelity with respect to the experimental treatments. The main effects of the process parameters revealed that the effects of process variation were dependent on the position of the μ-pillars. Results showed that a number of process fingerprints follow the same trends as the replication fidelity of the on-part μ-pillars. Instead, only one of the two on-runner μ-pillar position measurands can effectively serve as product fingerprints. Thus, the method can be the foundation for the development of a fast part quality monitoring system with the potential to decrease the use of off-line, time-consuming detailed metrology for part and tool approval, provided that the fingerprints are specifically designed and selected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Machining Forces Due to Turning of Bimetallic Objects Made of Aluminum, Titanium, Cast Iron, and Mild/Stainless Steel
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2040068
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 5 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
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Abstract
This article elucidates the characteristics of machining forces (an important phenomenon by which machining is studied) using three sets of bimetallic specimens made of aluminum–titanium, aluminum–cast iron, and stainless steel–mild steel. The cutting, feed, and thrust forces were recorded for different cutting conditions [...] Read more.
This article elucidates the characteristics of machining forces (an important phenomenon by which machining is studied) using three sets of bimetallic specimens made of aluminum–titanium, aluminum–cast iron, and stainless steel–mild steel. The cutting, feed, and thrust forces were recorded for different cutting conditions (i.e., different cutting speeds, feeds, and cutting directions). Possibility distributions were used to quantify the uncertainty associated with machining forces, which were helpful in identifying the optimal machining direction. In synopsis, it was found that while machining the steel-based bimetallic specimens, keeping a low feed and high cutting speed is the better option, and the machining operation can be performed in both the hard-to-soft and soft-to-hard material directions, but machining in the soft-to-hard material direction is the better option. On the other hand, very soft materials should not be used in fabricating a bimetallic part because it creates machining problems. Cutting power was estimated using the cutting and feed force signals. Manufacturers who support sustainable product development (including design, manufacturing, and assembly) can benefit from the outcomes of this study because parts/products made of dissimilar materials (or multi-material objects) are better than their mono-material counterparts in terms of sustainability (cost, weight, and CO2 footprint). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermal Modeling of Temperature Distribution in Metal Additive Manufacturing Considering Effects of Build Layers, Latent Heat, and Temperature-Sensitivity of Material Properties
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2018, 2(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp2030063
Received: 12 August 2018 / Revised: 31 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 September 2018 / Published: 12 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6063 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A physics-based analytical model is proposed in order to predict the temperature profile during metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes, by considering the effects of temperature history in each layer, temperature-sensitivity of material properties and latent heat. The moving heat source analysis is used [...] Read more.
A physics-based analytical model is proposed in order to predict the temperature profile during metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes, by considering the effects of temperature history in each layer, temperature-sensitivity of material properties and latent heat. The moving heat source analysis is used in order to predict the temperature distribution inside a semi-infinite solid material. The laser thermal energy deposited into a control volume is absorbed by the material thermodynamic latent heat and conducted through the contacting solid boundaries. The analytical model takes in to account the typical multi-layer aspect of additive manufacturing processes for the first time. The modeling of the problem involving multiple layers is of great importance because the thermal interactions of successive layers affect the temperature gradients, which govern the heat transfer and thermal stress development mechanisms. The temperature profile is calculated for isotropic and homogeneous material. The proposed model can be used to predict the temperature in laser-based metal additive manufacturing configurations of either direct metal deposition or selective laser melting. A numerical analysis is also conducted to simulate the temperature profile in metal AM. These two models are compared with experimental results. The proposed model also well captured the melt pool geometry as it is compared to experimental values. In order to emphasize the importance of solving the problem considering multiple layers, the peak temperature considering the layer addition and peak temperature not considering the layer addition are compared. The results show that considering the layer addition aspect of metal additive manufacturing can help to better predict the surface temperature and melt pool geometry. An analysis is conducted to show the importance of considering the temperature sensitivity of material properties in predicting temperature. A comparison of the computational time is also provided for analytical and numerical modeling. Based on the obtained results, it appears that the proposed analytical method provides an effective and accurate method to predict the temperature in metal AM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anniversary Feature Papers)
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