Post Transplantation and Lifestyle: Focus on Exercise Prescription

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Exercise for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 3210

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Sport Medicine Center, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 50121 Florence, Italy
Interests: physical exercise; training; non-communicable chronic diseases; sedentary time; cardio-metabolic and inflammatory risk biomarkers; nutritional integration; functional evaluation; long-term efficacy of physical exercise; exercise prescription in non-communicable chronic disease and in solid organ transplantations; cardiotoxicity; echocardiographic deformation parameters
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lifestyle is an important aspect of managing several metabolic chronic diseases, and tailored exercise is especially recommended in many cases. Sports medicine focuses on these aspects, targeting the multiple positive effects of moderate-intensity mixed exercise. New subjects have been included in exercise prescription programs; among them, solid organ transplant patients are an emerging group for whom physical activity and sports are suggested.

They can be included in several tailored physical exercise programs, especially considering that transplantation is a risk factor for the development of “heart disease”, both pre- and post-transplant. Even with surgical treatment there is an increased prevalence of specific cardiovascular risk factors and, consequently, patients are affected by greater morbidity and mortality. A healthy lifestyle and physical activity are recommended to improve such outcomes.

This Special Issue aims to highlight physical activity in transplanted subjects. Myocardial function, body composition, and cardiopulmonary tests are fundamental in planning such exercise.

Dr. Laura Stefani
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • exercise prescription
  • transplantation
  • myocardial function
  • lifestyle
  • cardiotoxicity
  • body composition
  • hydration
  • cardiovascular performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 701 KiB  
Article
Cardiorespiratory Performance in Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients: The Dilemma to Combine Lifestyle and Fitness
by Giovannino Polara, Alessio Montagnoli, Roberto Palazzo, Melissa Orlandi, Gabriele Mascherini, Marco Corsi, Edoardo Falconi and Laura Stefani
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2024, 9(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk9010044 - 29 Feb 2024
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Abstract
It is widely demonstrated that moderate-intensity exercise is associated with improved fitness in non-communicable chronic diseases. However, there are no specific guidelines available for transplant recipients. Body composition is closely linked to exercise capacity, typically estimated by cardiopulmonary testing, but its potential correlation [...] Read more.
It is widely demonstrated that moderate-intensity exercise is associated with improved fitness in non-communicable chronic diseases. However, there are no specific guidelines available for transplant recipients. Body composition is closely linked to exercise capacity, typically estimated by cardiopulmonary testing, but its potential correlation with cardiovascular health outcomes has not been investigated yet. This study aims to evaluate and compare cardiorespiratory performance and body composition in two groups of liver and kidney transplant recipients. A mixed group of transplant recipients (10 kidney and 15 liver) participating in a lifestyle reconditioning program through unsupervised physical exercise prescription was examined. Both groups were assessed using bioimpedance analysis (BIA), lifestyle, and physical activity levels by IPAQ questionnaire and cardiopulmonary testing (CPET). The two groups differed by IPAQ examination: liver transplant patients practiced more physical activity. Statistically significant differences were found in peak VO2/HR (oxygen pulse), which was higher in the kidney group compared to the liver group (15.63 vs. 12.49 with p < 0.05). Body composition did not show significant differences in BMI and the percentage of FM/FFM (FFM: 78.04 ± 7.7 in Kidney T vs. 77.78 ± 7.2 in Liver T). Systolic pressure measured at the peak was significantly higher in the liver group (162.6 vs. 134 with p < 0.01). The correlation between the CPET and BIA parameters showed a positive VO2 max and FFM mass trend. The results suggest differences in cardiorespiratory fitness between the two populations of solid organ transplant recipients despite not being related to the physical activity level. The data support the importance of body composition analysis in sports medicine and the prescription of physical exercise, especially considering the potential correlation with VO2 max, even though home-based exercise does not seem to alter it substantially. BMI does not appear to be a determinant of cardiovascular performance. Other determinants should be investigated to understand the differences observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Transplantation and Lifestyle: Focus on Exercise Prescription)
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9 pages, 446 KiB  
Article
Effect of Telerehabilitation and Outpatient Rehabilitation in Women with Breast Cancer
by Dalila Scaturro, Fabio Vitagliani, Maria Silvia Mangano, Sofia Tomasello, Cristiano Sconza, Stefano Respizzi, Michele Vecchio and Giulia Letizia Mauro
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030105 - 27 Jul 2023
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Abstract
Telemedicine was shown to be indispensable during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic to ensure continuity of care for fragile patients. We compared a telerehabilitation program versus an outpatient rehabilitation program in women with breast cancer undergoing quadrantectomy surgery. There were 56 women with breast cancer [...] Read more.
Telemedicine was shown to be indispensable during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic to ensure continuity of care for fragile patients. We compared a telerehabilitation program versus an outpatient rehabilitation program in women with breast cancer undergoing quadrantectomy surgery. There were 56 women with breast cancer divided into two groups: the treatment group (TG), made up of 24 patients undergoing a remote rehabilitation project program; and the control group (CG), composed of 32 patients subjected to the same rehabilitation project program in an outpatient setting. At the time of enrollment (T0) and the end of the 8 weeks of treatment (T1), the following questionnaire scores were considered: numerical rating scale (NRS), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (Quick-DASH), Piper fatigue scale (PFS)m and Breast Cancer Therapy Functional Rating Scale (FACT-B). We observed that the CG showed greater improvements than the TG in upper limb function (7.8 ± 4.2 vs. 10.9 ± 4.9; p < 0.05) and quality of life (27.9 ± 7.2 vs. 40.0 ± 3.3; p < 0.05). No difference in efficacy between the two groups was observed for pain (2.2 ± 0.6 vs. 2.3 ± 0.9; p = 0.64) and fatigue (3.2 ± 1.1 vs. 3.2 ± 0.6; p = 0.66). Telerehabilitation is a valid tool in the management of women with breast cancer in the postoperative phase. However, face-to-face rehabilitation treatment may be preferred because it is more effective as it allows the construction of a specific, personalized, and targeted rehabilitation program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post Transplantation and Lifestyle: Focus on Exercise Prescription)
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