Special Issue "Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites"

A special issue of Journal of Composites Science (ISSN 2504-477X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Mohammad H. Malakooti
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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Interests: multifunctional composites; additive manufacturing; nanomaterial synthesis; wearable electronics, soft matter, integrated sensors
Dr. Christopher C. Bowland
Website
Guest Editor
Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA
Interests: nanocomposites; fiber reinforced composite sensors; fiber–matrix interfaces; sustainable materials; printable composites; multifunctional composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have become ubiquitous structural materials owing to their high specific strength, impact resistance, and scalable manufacturing. Unlike other structural materials, FRP composites, with their tailored mechanical behavior, can be engineered and optimized to fulfill specific engineering purposes. Various synthetic or natural short fibers, continuous tows, or woven fabrics can be used to reinforce. The polymer matrix can be thermoset or thermoplastic with different thermal and mechanical properties. FRP composites have gained even more popularity in recent years owing to the continued progress in additive manufacturing. With the increasing demand and user experience, there is a serious need for new materials, fabrication methods, characterization techniques, and design frameworks.

This Special Issue focuses on advanced composites with tailored mechanical properties and integrated functional properties. The authors are encouraged to submit papers related to the mechanics and manufacturing of FRP composites, as well as novel methodologies to integrate non-structural functions in FRP composites. Experimental and theoretical studies on the development of advanced composite materials with enhanced thermal and electrical properties are also welcome. Authors may contribute to this Special Issue by submitting their original papers as well as progress reports and review articles.

Prof. Mohammad H. Malakooti
Dr. Christopher C. Bowland
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Composites Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Structural composites
  • Functional composites
  • Lightweight structures
  • Embedded sensing
  • Electronic composites
  • Recyclable composites
  • Sustainable composites
  • Self-healing
  • Impact resistant
  • Composite fabrication
  • Thermoplastic composites
  • 3D printing
  • Automated fiber placement
  • High temperature composites
  • Cryogenic composites
  • Surfaces and interfaces
  • Nanostructures
  • Composite failure
  • Tthermomechanical behavior
  • Fiber treatment
  • Tailored properties
  • Micromechanics modeling
  • Multiscale modeling
  • Topology optimization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Characterisation of the Damage Process under Buckling Load in Composite Reinforced by Flax Fibres
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(3), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4030085 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this work was to analyse the damage process resulting from buckling load applied on composites reinforced by flax fibre. Continuous buckling tests were performed on specimens until cracks appeared on their outer face. These tests were monitored with an acoustic [...] Read more.
The purpose of this work was to analyse the damage process resulting from buckling load applied on composites reinforced by flax fibre. Continuous buckling tests were performed on specimens until cracks appeared on their outer face. These tests were monitored with an acoustic emission system. The high sensitivity of this method allows the detection of any process or mechanism generating sound waves. Moreover, this technic has the advantage of not causing contact in the deformed zone and, thus, to overcome the parasitic damage that may result from the stress concentrations in these areas. A multiparametric analysis was used to identify the acoustic signatures corresponding to each damage mechanism involved in the materials and then to follow their evolution in order to identify the most critical mechanisms leading to the final breakage of the material. The presence of these damage mechanisms were confirmed post-test by microscopic observations. Three orientations of laminate specimens (0°, 90° and 45°), relative to flax fabric architecture, were tested in order to characterise and highlight their own damage process. Similarities and differences were observed among these mechanisms. We deduced that the high porosity rate found in our composites were the result of manufacturing parameters. Architecture and properties of the flax fabric influenced negatively the mechanical properties later by accentuating the gap between theoretical and practical values (17% to 22.4%) and by accelerating the development of certain damage, such as matrix cracking, where the acoustic hit density was superior to 70% and the fibre/matrix decohesion which occurred very early. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites)
Open AccessArticle
Tensile Properties of Z-Pin Reinforced Laminates with Circumferentially Notched Z-Pins
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020078 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
This paper describes experimental investigations on the in-plane tensile properties of unidirectional carbon-fibre/epoxy laminates reinforced with circumferentially notched z-pins with different notch designs. From the results it can be concluded that the application of circumferential notches at the z-pin surface with constant notch [...] Read more.
This paper describes experimental investigations on the in-plane tensile properties of unidirectional carbon-fibre/epoxy laminates reinforced with circumferentially notched z-pins with different notch designs. From the results it can be concluded that the application of circumferential notches at the z-pin surface with constant notch depth of 20 μm and distance of 100 μm has no significant effect on the in-plane tensile strength values, regardless of the notch designs investigated. For circular and rectangular notch designs, no dependence of the tensile strength from the notch depth could be observed. Only changing the notch distances at a constant notch depth and width leads to small increases in the tensile strength values with increasing notch distance. The determined tensile modulus values indicate that there are no substantial deviations between laminates reinforced with unnotched and circumferentially notched z-pins, no matter which notch design is considered. It can be observed that there are no dependencies of the tensile modulus from notch depth and distance. Therefore, it can be assumed that the microstructural changes influencing the in-plane tensile properties will not be changed, or only to a very small extent, by the presence of notches on the pin surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Nonlinear-Elastic Orthotropic Material Modeling of an Epoxy-Based Polymer for Predicting the Material Behavior of Transversely Loaded Fiber-Reinforced Composites
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020046 - 02 May 2020
Abstract
Micromechanical analyses of transversely loaded fiber-reinforced composites are conducted to gain a better understanding of the damage behavior and to predict the composite behavior from known parameters of the fibers and the matrix. Currently, purely elastic material models for the epoxy-based polymeric matrix [...] Read more.
Micromechanical analyses of transversely loaded fiber-reinforced composites are conducted to gain a better understanding of the damage behavior and to predict the composite behavior from known parameters of the fibers and the matrix. Currently, purely elastic material models for the epoxy-based polymeric matrix do not capture the nonlinearity and the tension/compression-asymmetry of the resin’s material behavior. In the present contribution, a purely elastic material model is presented that captures these effects. To this end, a nonlinear-elastic orthotropic material modeling is proposed. Using this matrix material model, finite element-based simulations are performed to predict the composite behavior under transverse tension, transverse compression and shear. Therefore, the composite’s cross-section is modeled by a representative volume element. To evaluate the matrix modeling approach, the simulation results are compared to experimental data and the prediction error is computed. Furthermore, the accuracy of the prediction is compared to that of selected literature models. Compared to both experimental and literature data, the proposed modeling approach gives a good prediction of the composite behavior under matrix-dominated load cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites)
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