Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Otolaryngology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 March 2023) | Viewed by 10653

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1st Otorhinolaryngology Department, School of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: dysphagia; swallowing; voice; laryngology; olfaction; patient-reported-outcome-measures; laryngopharyngeal reflux; clinical biomarkers; smell

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Guest Editor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Head & Neck cancer; skin cancer; melanoma; maxillofacial surgery; reconstructive surgery; clinical pharmacology; orthognathic surgery; patient-reported-outcome-measures; laryngopharyngeal reflux; clinical biomarkers; prognostic factors; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measurement tools that capture a person’s perception of their own health. A patient-reported outcome is any report of the status of a patient’s health condition that comes directly from the patient. PROMs enable patients to provide information on aspects of their health status that are relevant to their quality of life, including symptoms, daily functioning, physical, mental, and social wellbeing. Typically, generic (applied across different populations) and disease-specific (used to assess outcomes that are specific to a particular disease or sector of care) PROMs are administered at the same time as they provide complementary information since generic tools are likely to lack sensitivity to capture outcomes related to diseases of the head and neck. A large number of disease-specific outcome measures have been developed to address diseases of the head and neck, such as head and neck cancer, allergic rhinitis, rhinosinusitis, nasal obstruction and septal surgery, voice disorders, dysphagia, otitis media, hearing impairment, dizziness, tinnitus, adenotonsilitis, sleep-disordered breathing, facial paralysis, reflux, oral health, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and orthognathic surgery. Recently, there has been increased interest in PROMs among clinicians, healthcare providers, and health system-level policy developers.

We invite authors to contribute to the Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine on “Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck” studies investigating the use of PROMs in clinical practice, clinical research, quality improvement, and health system policy development for diseases of the head and neck. This includes but is not limited to studies showcasing how PROMs can facilitate the tracking of health outcomes over time, enable comparisons between an individual patient’s outcomes with those of other patients with the same health conditions, contribute to the provision of person-centered and value-based care, improve clinician–patient communication, inform shared decision making, and help to analyze the comparative effectiveness of treatments, variations in care, costs, and outcomes among healthcare providers and the effectiveness of quality improvement activities.

Prof. Dr. Athanasia Printza
Dr. Athanassios Kyrgidis
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)
  • diseases of the head and neck
  • person-centered care
  • health status
  • quality of life
  • symptoms
  • functioning
  • effectiveness of treatments
  • physical, mental, and social wellbeing

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 172 KiB  
Editorial
Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck
by Athanasia Printza
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(12), 3358; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11123358 - 11 Jun 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1321
Abstract
Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measurement tools that capture a person’s perception of their own health [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

15 pages, 691 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of the Life for Low Vision Questionnaire (LIFE4LVQ) Using Rasch Analysis: A Questionnaire Evaluating Ability and Independence
by Stavroula Almpanidou, Diamantis Almaliotis, Leonidas Karamitopoulos, Fotios Topouzis, Anastasios-Georgios Konstas, Georgios Labiris, Theodoros Dardavesis, Konstantinos N. Fountoulakis, Konstantinos Ch. Chatzisavvas and Vasileios Karampatakis
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(7), 2549; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12072549 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1540
Abstract
Low vision (LV) has a substantial impact on an individual’s daily functionality and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly incorporated into the evaluation of this problem. The objective of this study was to describe the design of the new “Life for Low Vision [...] Read more.
Low vision (LV) has a substantial impact on an individual’s daily functionality and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly incorporated into the evaluation of this problem. The objective of this study was to describe the design of the new “Life for Low Vision Questionnaire (LIFE4LVQ)”, as a measure of daily functionality in LV and to explore its psychometric properties. A total of 294 participants completed the LIFE4LVQ and the data were subjected to Rasch analysis to determine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire, including response category ordering, item fit statistics, principal component analysis, precision, differential item functioning, and targeting. Test–retest reliability was evaluated with an interval of three weeks and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used. The correlation between the questionnaire score and Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was examined using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Rasch analysis revealed that for most items the infit and outfit mean square fit values were close to 1, both for the whole scale and its subscales (ability and independence). The separation index for person measures was 5.18 with a reliability of 0.96, indicating good discriminant ability and adequate model fit. Five response categories were found for all items. The ICC was 0.96 (p < 0.001; 95% CI, 0.93–0.98), suggesting excellent repeatability of the measure. Poorer BCVA was significantly associated with worse scores (rho = 0.559, p < 0.001), indicating excellent convergent validity. The functional, 40-item LIFE4LVQ proved to be a reliable and valid tool that effectively measures the impact of LV on ability and independence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)
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12 pages, 253 KiB  
Article
Quality of Life in Oral Cancer Patients in Greek Clinical Practice: A Cohort Study
by Maria Lavdaniti, Ioannis Tilaveridis, Dimitra Palitzika, Athanasios Kyrgidis, Stefanos Triaridis, Konstantinos Vachtsevanos, Angeliki Kosintzi and Konstantinos Antoniades
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(23), 7235; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11237235 - 6 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1321
Abstract
Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common cancers all over the world. Oral cancer and its treatment impacts on patients’ Quality of Life (QOL). The purpose of the present study was to assess oral cancer patients’ QOL after the [...] Read more.
Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common cancers all over the world. Oral cancer and its treatment impacts on patients’ Quality of Life (QOL). The purpose of the present study was to assess oral cancer patients’ QOL after the completion of surgical therapy, and to investigate factors affecting it. This was a prospective cohort study, conducted at the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, of a large general public hospital in Northern Greece. The sample consisted of 135 consecutive eligible cancer patients. Three distinct questionnaires were used. The first one included questions regarding the participants’ demographic characteristics and relevant clinical information. The second comprised the European Organization for Research and Treatment core module (EORTC QLQ-C30) and its head and neck module EORTC QLQ-H&N35. The third was the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General (FACT-G) assessment of quality of life. We also included the physician-completed Karnofsky scale to assess the functional status of the participants. We found that location of the tumor affects QOL and specifically social contact (H = 17.89, p = 0.001), on the first assessment, and nutritional supplements (H = 22.49, p = 0.000), on the fourth assessment. QOL in patients deteriorates immediately after treatment but significantly improves over time. Health care professionals should take into account these results and arrange care plans in order to find ways to increase patients’ QOL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)
11 pages, 1032 KiB  
Article
Quality-of-Life Assessment after Head and Neck Oncological Surgery for Advanced-Stage Tumours
by Paula Luiza Bejenaru, Bogdan Popescu, Alina Lavinia Antoaneta Oancea, Catrinel Beatrice Simion-Antonie, Gloria Simona Berteșteanu, Mihnea Condeescu-Cojocarița, Anca Ionela Cîrstea, Irina Doinița Oașă, Teodora Elena Schipor-Diaconu, Dan Popescu and Raluca Grigore
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(16), 4875; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11164875 - 19 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1158
Abstract
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is a common malignancy often diagnosed in the advanced stage with a complex negative influence on the patient’s quality of life (QoL). Given its multi-modal treatment, the first step is to adequately balance the [...] Read more.
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is a common malignancy often diagnosed in the advanced stage with a complex negative influence on the patient’s quality of life (QoL). Given its multi-modal treatment, the first step is to adequately balance the needs of the patient, and the second step includes the consultations, interventions, and care provided by the medical team, with the purpose of improving the overall management of the HNSCC. Current attempts to develop and validate quality-of-life instruments specific to cancers of the head and neck have been reported, and certain questionnaires are now available. We performed a retrospective study in a tertiary centre, involving 89 patients who survived 3 years after HNSCC surgery. A patient-related outcome measurement was made using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 instruments to assess QoL at admission and 3 years after treatment. The 3-year survivors reported an overall improvement in QoL compared with those in the pre-treatment period. The unique details of head and neck cancer treatments outline the importance of considering the characteristics of the patient population in quality-of-life research and also identify how quality-of-life data can contribute to the care provided by the multi-disciplinary team involved in a patient’s follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)
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14 pages, 1078 KiB  
Article
Quality of Life after Surgical Treatment of Brain Tumors
by Agnieszka Królikowska, Karolina Filipska-Blejder, Renata Jabłońska, Beata Haor, Anna Antczak-Komoterska, Monika Biercewicz, Lech Grzelak, Marek Harat and Robert Ślusarz
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(13), 3733; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11133733 - 28 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1610
Abstract
Quality of life is one of the parameters that characterize the success of brain tumor treatments, along with overall survival and a disease-free life. Thus, the main aim of this research was to evaluate the quality of life after the surgical treatment of [...] Read more.
Quality of life is one of the parameters that characterize the success of brain tumor treatments, along with overall survival and a disease-free life. Thus, the main aim of this research was to evaluate the quality of life after the surgical treatment of brain tumors. The research material included 236 patients who were to undergo surgery for brain tumors. The participants completed the quality of life questionnaires EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0) and EORTC QLQ-BN20 on the day of admission to the department, on the fifth day after the removal of the brain tumor, and thirty days after the surgical procedure. Descriptive statistics, Student’s t-test, the Kruskal–Wallis test, the Shapiro–Wolf test, ANOVA, and Fisher’s least significant difference post hoc test were performed. The mean score of the questionnaire before the surgical procedure amounted to 0.706, 5 days after surgery it amounted to 0.614, and 30 days after surgery to 0.707. The greatest reduction in the quality of life immediately after the procedure was observed in patients with low-grade glial tumors (WHO I, II) and extracerebral tumors (meningiomas and neuromas). Thirty days after surgery, an improvement in the quality of life was observed in all included groups. The greatest improvement was recorded in the group of patients operated on for meningioma and neuroblastoma, and the lowest in patients treated for metastatic tumors. Contemporary surgical procedures used in neurosurgery reduce the quality of life in patients with brain tumors only in the early postoperative period. Histopathological diagnoses of these tumors impact the quality of life of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)
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12 pages, 470 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Objective and Subjective Swallowing Outcomes in Patients with Dysphagia Treated for Head and Neck Cancer
by Hsin-Hao Liou, Shu-Wei Tsai, Miyuki Hsing-Chun Hsieh, Yi-Jen Chen, Jenn-Ren Hsiao, Cheng-Chih Huang, Chun-Yen Ou, Chan-Chi Chang, Wei-Ting Lee, Sen-Tien Tsai and David Shang-Yu Hung
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(3), 692; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11030692 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2648
Abstract
We evaluated objective and subjective swallowing function outcomes in patients with dysphagia treated for head and neck cancer (HNC) and identified risk factors for poor swallowing outcomes. Patients undergoing videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) between January 2016 and March 2021 were divided into four [...] Read more.
We evaluated objective and subjective swallowing function outcomes in patients with dysphagia treated for head and neck cancer (HNC) and identified risk factors for poor swallowing outcomes. Patients undergoing videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) between January 2016 and March 2021 were divided into four groups according to primary tumor sites; post-treatment dysphagia was assessed. The penetration–aspiration scale (PAS) and bolus residue scale (BRS) were used to objectively assess swallowing function through VFSS. The Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) was used for subjective analyses of swallowing statuses. To account for potential confounding, important covariates were adjusted for in logistic regression models. Oropharyngeal tumors were significantly more likely to have poor PAS and BRS scores than oral cavity tumors, and the patients with nasopharyngeal tumors were significantly less likely to have poor FOIS scores. Old age, having multiple HNCs, and a history of radiotherapy were associated with an increased odds of poor PAS scores (for all types of swallows), poor BRS scores (for semiliquid and solid swallows), and poor FOIS scores, respectively. This indicates using only subjective assessments may not allow for accurate evaluations of swallowing function in patients treated for HNC. Using both objective and subjective assessments may allow for comprehensive evaluations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Reported-Outcome Measures in Diseases of the Head and Neck)
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