Clinical Updates on Maternal Fetal Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 1233

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2. Department of Nursing, Jerusalem College of Technology, Jerusalem, Israel
Interests: fetal growth restriction; twin pregnancies; preterm birth; diabetes in pregnancy

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Guest Editor
Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, University Hospital "G. Martino", Messina, Italy
Interests: endometriosis; laparoscopic ginecology; preterm birth; cholestasis in pregnancy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Maternal fetal medicine (MFM) represents a dynamic field of healthcare that continually evolves to enhance maternal and fetal well-being. This Special Issue, "Clinical Updates on Maternal Fetal Medicine", aims to provide a comprehensive platform for the dissemination of cutting-edge research, clinical insights, and evidence-based practices in the realm of MFM.

Our primary objective is to facilitate the exchange of knowledge among clinicians, researchers, and healthcare professionals, fostering collaborative efforts to address contemporary challenges in the care of expectant mothers and their unborn children. We invite contributions that encompass a wide spectrum of topics within MFM, including, but not limited to, prenatal screening, diagnostic techniques, perinatal interventions, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcomes.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles and comprehensive reviews that advance our understanding of MFM. We encourage submissions that explore innovative diagnostic tools, therapeutic strategies, and multidisciplinary approaches to optimize maternal–fetal care.

We invite researchers and clinicians to contribute their expertise to this collaborative effort, ultimately advancing the field of maternal fetal medicine and improving outcomes for pregnant individuals and their infants.

Dr. Misgav Rottenstreich
Prof. Dr. Roberta Granese
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diabetes in pregnancy
  • hypertension in pregnancy
  • cholestasis in pregnancy
  • endocrine disorder in pregnancy
  • sepsis in pregnancy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 399 KiB  
Article
Labor Induction in Women with Isolated Polyhydramnios at Term: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Analysis
by Yael Lerner, Tzuria Peled, Morag Yehushua, Reut Rotem, Ari Weiss, Hen Y. Sela, Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky and Misgav Rottenstreich
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051416 - 29 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Background: With the increasing popularity of elective induction after 39 + 0 weeks, the question of whether induction of labor (IOL) is safe in women with isolated polyhydramnios has become more relevant. We aimed to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes associated with IOL among [...] Read more.
Background: With the increasing popularity of elective induction after 39 + 0 weeks, the question of whether induction of labor (IOL) is safe in women with isolated polyhydramnios has become more relevant. We aimed to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes associated with IOL among women with and without isolated polyhydramnios. Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective cohort that included women who underwent induction of labor at term. The study compared women who underwent IOL due to isolated polyhydramnios to low-risk women who underwent elective IOL due to gestational age only. The main outcome measure was a composite adverse maternal outcome, while the secondary outcomes included maternal and neonatal adverse pregnancy outcomes. Results: During the study period, 1004 women underwent IOL at term and met inclusion and exclusion criteria; 162 had isolated polyhydramnios, and 842 had a normal amount of amniotic fluid. Women who had isolated polyhydramnios had higher rates of the composite adverse maternal outcome (28.7% vs. 20.4%, p = 0.02), prolonged hospital stay, perineal tear grade 3/4, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal hypoglycemia. Multivariate analyses revealed that among women with IOL, polyhydramnios was significantly associated with adverse composite maternal outcome [aOR 1.98 (1.27–3.10), p < 0.01]. Conclusions: IOL in women with isolated polyhydramnios at term was associated with worse perinatal outcomes compared to low-risk women who underwent elective IOL. Our findings suggest that the management of women with polyhydramnios cannot be extrapolated from studies of low-risk populations and that clinical decision-making should take into account the individual patient’s risk factors and preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Updates on Maternal Fetal Medicine)
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9 pages, 259 KiB  
Article
Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Second Trimester of Gravidity
by Vendula Bartáková, Katarína Chalásová, Lukáš Pácal, Veronika Ťápalová, Jan Máchal, Petr Janků and Kateřina Kaňková
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1260; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051260 - 22 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Background: Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (MS) after delivery. MS could precede gravidity. The aims of this study were (i) to detect the prevalence of MS in women at the time of GDM diagnosis, (ii) [...] Read more.
Background: Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (MS) after delivery. MS could precede gravidity. The aims of this study were (i) to detect the prevalence of MS in women at the time of GDM diagnosis, (ii) to detect the prevalence of MS in the subgroup of GDM patients with any form of impaired glucose tolerance after delivery (PGI), and (iii) to determine whether GDM women with MS have a higher risk of peripartal adverse outcomes. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study comprised n = 455 women with GDM. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria for MS definition were modified to the pregnancy situation. Results: MS was detected in 22.6% of GDM patients in those with PGI 40%. The presence of MS in GDM patients was associated with two peripartal outcomes: higher incidence of pathologic Apgar score and macrosomia (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0004, chi-square). Conclusions: The presence of MS in GDM patients is a statistically significant risk factor (p = 0.04 chi-square) for PGI. A strong clinical implication of our findings might be to include MS diagnostics within GDM screening using modified MS criteria in the second trimester of pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Updates on Maternal Fetal Medicine)
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