Special Issue "Pathogenesis, Clinical Diagnosis, Treatments and Complications of Glomerular Diseases"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Nephrology & Urology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andreas Kronbichler
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine IV (Nephrology and Hypertension), Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Interests: vasculitis; nephrotic syndrome; glomerular disease; contrast-associated acute kidney injury; systemic lupus erythematosus
Dr. Jiwon M. Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon 35015, Republic of Korea
Interests: nephrotic syndrome; glomerular disease; systemic lupus erythematosus
Prof. Jae Il Shin
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
2. Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Severance Children’s Hospital, Seoul 03722, Korea
3. Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
Interests: vasculitis; nephrotic syndrome; glomerular disease; systemic lupus erythematosus; meta-analysis; immunity; autoimmunity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The area of glomerular diseases is changing and research that aims to gain insight into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and complications of, treatment approaches to, or therapeutic measures for the underlying disease is on the increase.

This Special Issue welcomes articles either highlighting recent developments in or providing new experimental (in vitro or animal model) or clinical (human) data related to glomerular diseases. We would appreciate it if the authors provided a brief section in their manuscript indicating the novelty of their findings or, in the case of review articles, provided personal views on a particular topic (e.g., treatment of recurrent glomerulonephritis after kidney transplantation).

In summary, we are happy to host this Special Issue and welcome solicited and unsolicited submissions that will contribute to its success.

With kind regards,

Dr. Andreas Kronbichler
Dr. Jiwon M. Lee
Prof. Jae Il Shin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • glomerulonephritis
  • recurrence
  • treatment
  • diagnosis
  • pathogenesis
  • kidney disease
  • glomerular disease
  • vasculitis
  • systemic lupus erythematosus
  • nephrotic syndrome

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Serum Uric Acid is Associated with Renal Prognosis of Lupus Nephritis in Women but not in Men
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(3), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9030773 - 12 Mar 2020
Abstract
Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Early intervention in lupus nephritis improves prognosis. There is an association between hyperuricemia and lupus nephritis; nevertheless, the sex-specific role of uric acid in lupus nephritis remains unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 578 [...] Read more.
Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Early intervention in lupus nephritis improves prognosis. There is an association between hyperuricemia and lupus nephritis; nevertheless, the sex-specific role of uric acid in lupus nephritis remains unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 578 patients diagnosed with LN by renal biopsy. We determine the relationship of serum uric acid to progression of LN using Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and Cox proportional hazards models. The primary end point was LN progression defined as the initiation of dialysis or kidney transplantation. Men had higher mean serum uric acid levels than did women. Every 1 mg/dL increase in baseline uric acid level increased the risk of LN progression by 15.1%. The serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for LN progression in women (hazard ratio [HR], 1.158; confidence interval [CI], 1.018–1.317; p = 0.028) but not in men (HR, 1.499; CI, 0.964–2.331; p = 0.072). Sensitivity analysis involving serum uric acid terciles generated consistent and robust results. Serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for LN progression in women but not in men. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Severe Infection in Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease: A Retrospective Multicenter French Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(3), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9030698 - 04 Mar 2020
Abstract
In patients presenting with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease with advanced isolated kidney involvement, the benefit of intensive therapy remains controversial due to adverse events, particularly infection. We aim to describe the burden of severe infections (SI) (requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotics) and [...] Read more.
In patients presenting with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease with advanced isolated kidney involvement, the benefit of intensive therapy remains controversial due to adverse events, particularly infection. We aim to describe the burden of severe infections (SI) (requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotics) and identify predictive factors of SI in a large cohort of patients with anti-GBM disease. Among the 201 patients (median [IQR] age, 53 [30–71] years) included, 74 had pulmonary involvement and 127 isolated glomerulonephritis. A total of 161 SI occurred in 116 patients during the first year after diagnosis. These infections occurred during the early stage of care (median [IQR] time, 13 [8–19] days after diagnosis) with mainly pulmonary (45%), catheter-associated bacteremia (22%) and urinary tract (21%) infections. In multivariable analysis, positive ANCA (HR [95% CI] 1.62 [1.07−2.44]; p = 0.02) and age at diagnosis (HR [95% CI] 1.10 [1.00–1.21]; p = 0.047) remained independently associated with SI. Age-adjusted severe infection during the first three months was associated with an increased three-year mortality rate (HR [95% CI] 3.13 [1.24–7.88]; p = 0.01). Thus, SI is a common early complication in anti-GBM disease, particularly in the elderly and those with positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). No significant association was observed between immunosuppressive strategy and occurrence of SI. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
TLR2 Expression on Select Lymphocyte Subsets as a New Marker in Glomerulonephritis
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020541 - 17 Feb 2020
Abstract
Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling may be involved in autoimmune kidney disorders and has been implicated in proliferative and non-proliferative glomerulonephritis (PGN and NPGN). In this study, we investigated the expression of TLR2 on T and B lymphocytes in relation to selected clinical parameters [...] Read more.
Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling may be involved in autoimmune kidney disorders and has been implicated in proliferative and non-proliferative glomerulonephritis (PGN and NPGN). In this study, we investigated the expression of TLR2 on T and B lymphocytes in relation to selected clinical parameters in patients with PGN and NPGN. We collected peripheral blood from the ulnar vein of patients with PGN (n = 15) or NPGN (n = 22) and healthy volunteers (n = 20). The percentage of peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing TLR2 was determined with flow cytometry. TLR2 expression on T and B lymphocytes was increased in PGN patients compared with NPGN patients and controls (p ≤ 0.001). In patients with PGN, TLR2 expression correlated negatively with the serum concentrations of IgG and albumin and positively with urine protein excretion. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that TLR2 expression is a highly specific marker to distinguish PGN patients from NPGN patients and controls, especially on CD4+ T lymphocytes. Its use as a non-invasive marker of disease should be further investigated. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Minor Glomerular Abnormalities are Associated with Deterioration of Long-Term Kidney Function and Mitochondrial Injury
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010033 - 22 Dec 2019
Abstract
Minor glomerular abnormalities (MGAs) are unclassified glomerular lesions indicated by the presence of minor structural abnormalities that are insufficient for a specific pathological diagnosis. The long-term clinical outcomes and pathogenesis have not been examined. We hypothesized that MGAs would be associated with the [...] Read more.
Minor glomerular abnormalities (MGAs) are unclassified glomerular lesions indicated by the presence of minor structural abnormalities that are insufficient for a specific pathological diagnosis. The long-term clinical outcomes and pathogenesis have not been examined. We hypothesized that MGAs would be associated with the deterioration of long-term kidney function and increased urinary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers. We retrospectively enrolled patients with MGAs, age-/sex-/estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-matched patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), and similarly matched healthy controls (MHCs; n = 49 each). We analyzed the time × group interaction effects of the eGFR and compared mean annual eGFR decline rates between the groups. We prospectively enrolled patients with MGAs, age- and sex-matched patients with IgAN, and MHCs (n = 15 each) and compared their urinary mtDNA copy numbers. Compared to the MHC group, the MGA and IgAN groups displayed differences in the time × group effects of eGFR, higher mean annual rates of eGFR decline, and higher urinary mtDNA copy numbers; however, these groups did not significantly differ from each other. The results indicate that MGAs are associated with deteriorating long-term kidney function, and mitochondrial injury, despite few additional pathological changes. We suggest that clinicians conduct close long-term follow-up of patients with MGAs. Full article
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