Special Issue "Applications of Infrared Thermography to Infrastructure Inspection"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Susana Laguela

TIDOP Research Group, University of Salamanca, Ávila, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34 636 391 186
Interests: thermal infrared; satellite imagery; solar energy; energy 3D modelling; thermographic 3D modelling; image processing; energy balance
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Massimo Menenti

Department of Geosciennce and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5048 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 15 2784244
Interests: earth observation, land surface processes, hydrology, water management, optical and laser remote sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The technique of Infrared Thermography has been the object of great development in recent years, mainly because of the diversity in the fields of application in engineering, architecture and industry. It has emerged as a complete, versatile and innovative solution for non-destructive testing (NDT) in order to obtain information on the materials and construction compounds for their evaluation.

The thermographic process is based on the radiation heat transfer phenomena; thus, the knowledge about the different parameters and correction factors involved in the process is of vital importance for the correct interpretation of the data acquired. The energy balance involved in the thermographic measurement widens the application of the technique towards the determination of the energy behaviour of the structures (buried or not) and machines, as well as of their supporting soil.

The Infrastructures Journal MDPI (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/infrastructures) was recently launched. It is an international scholarly journal covering all aspects of infrastructure engineering. Naturally, infrared thermography is a very timely topic, which led us to launch a Special Issue to bring together new developments in the field, including but not limited to:
•    Active thermography for detection of subsurface defects
•    Active thermography for detection of buried elements
•    Thermal 3D modelling
•    Emissivity measurement
•    Effect of emissivity correction
•    Conjoint exploitation of thermal and geometric information
•    Thermal modelling of construction materials
•    Thermophysical characterization of new materials
•    Thermophysical characterization of construction elements and building pathologies
•    Infrared thermography for energy efficiency
•    Thermography for shadow modelling in cities
•    Thermography for energy and water loss evaluation
•    Infrared for inspection of energy installations
•    Thermal characterization of soil for geothermal exploitation

Taking into account your expertise in the field of Infrared Thermography, we would like to invite you and your co-workers to participate in this Special Issue by submitting an original contribution within the topics highlighted above, according to the instructions available in the following link, which includes the attached Microsoft template: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/infrastructures/instructions

It is remarked that this journal is currently exempted from publication fees, which will therefore not be applicable to your submission.

You may send your manuscript now or up until the deadline. Submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. We also encourage authors to send a short abstract or tentative title to the Editorial Office in advance ([email protected]).

We thank you in advance for your best attention and hope to hear a positive answer from you soon.

Kind regards,
Dr. Susana Lagüela López
Prof. Dr. Massimo Menenti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Infrared Thermography for Weld Inspection: Feasibility and Application
Infrastructures 2018, 3(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures3040045
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
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Abstract
Traditional ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques have been widely used to detect surface and sub-surface defects of welds. UT inspection is a contact method which burdens the manufacturer by storing hot specimens for inspection when the material is cool. Additionally, UT is only valid [...] Read more.
Traditional ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques have been widely used to detect surface and sub-surface defects of welds. UT inspection is a contact method which burdens the manufacturer by storing hot specimens for inspection when the material is cool. Additionally, UT is only valid for 5 mm specimens or thicker and requires a highly skilled operator to perform the inspections and interpret the signals. Infrared thermography (IRT) has the potential to be implemented for weld inspections due to its non-contact nature. In this study, the feasibility of using IRT to overcome the limitations of UT inspection is investigated to detect inclusion, porosity, cracking, and lack of fusion in 38 weld specimens with thicknesses of 3, 8 and 13 mm. UT inspection was also performed to locate regions containing defects in the 8 mm and 13 mm specimens. Results showed that regions diagnosed with defects by the UT inspection lost heat faster than the sound weld. The IRT method was applied to six 3 mm specimens to detect their defects and successfully detected lack of fusion in one of them. All specimens were cut at the locations indicated by UT and IRT methods which proved the presence of a defect in 86% of the specimens. Despite the agreement with the UT inspection, the proposed IRT method had limited success in locating the defects in the 8 mm specimens. To fully implement in-line IRT-based weld inspections more investigations are required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Infrared Thermography to Infrastructure Inspection)
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Open AccessArticle In Situ Measurements of Thermal Properties of Building Fabrics Using Thermography under Non-Steady State Heat Flow Conditions
Infrastructures 2018, 3(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures3030020
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5714 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study describes a quantitative method using thermography to measure the thermal properties of building fabrics that are subjected to non-steady state heat flow due to consistently changing meteorological conditions. The method includes two parts. First, the convection heat transfer coefficient is measured [...] Read more.
This study describes a quantitative method using thermography to measure the thermal properties of building fabrics that are subjected to non-steady state heat flow due to consistently changing meteorological conditions. The method includes two parts. First, the convection heat transfer coefficient is measured by thermography and heat flux meters on a small segment of the examined building fabric with uniform surface temperature. Then, thermal properties of large building fabrics are evaluated by thermography. The two parts are measured simultaneously. The method was tested on 140/160/190 mm thick massive laminated spruce timber walls of a test facility cabin located in Östersund, Sweden. The results varied by only a few percent in comparison to validation measurements performed with heat flux meters and in comparison, to values from the literature. Due to rapid changes in weather conditions the measured values had large disparity, but still a linear regression with low confidence interval was obtained. Obtaining an accurate value of convection heat transfer was important for achieving high measurement accuracy and, therefore, the value of this parameter should be measured. Other important factors to consider are solar radiation, reflected infrared (IR) radiation from nearby objects and the number of thermal images. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Infrared Thermography to Infrastructure Inspection)
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