ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Microbiota and Cancer 2.0

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2022) | Viewed by 40725

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences DIMEC, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: acute myeloid leukemia in children; pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children; next-generation sequencing; characterization and modulation of gut microbiota during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The human body is colonized by thousands of different microbial species that have a key role in our survival. In the last 15 years, our knowledge of human microbiomes has increased exponentially. Thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing, metabolomics, and genobiotic models, we have been able to dissect the compositional and functional microbiome structures, and to infer the mechanisms underlying the role of the microbiome in human biology and pathology. Particularly, mounting evidence has suggested a critical role of the microbiome in the maturation and continued education of the host immune response in susceptibility to cancer and in response to cancer treatment. The impact of the gut microbiota on anticancer immune responses has represented an intriguing and evolving scenario in the recent literature. Novel metacommunity approaches have provided an integrative and extensive vision of the tight link between microbiomes and cancer, and are giving new exciting insights into possible therapeutics implications.

This Special Issue titled “Microbiota and Cancer 2.0” will focus on the role of the human microbiome in the pathogenesis of cancer, in response to immunotherapy, in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in possible microbiota-based therapeutic or pre-emptive strategies to manage treatment-related complications.

Authors are invited to submit original research and review papers addressing the abovementioned topics to this Special Issue.

Dr. Riccardo Masetti
Dr. Silvia Turroni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • cancer
  • hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • human microbiome
  • immune system
  • colon cancer
  • carcinogenesis
  • nutrition
  • short-chain fatty acids
  • metagenomic
  • dysbiosis

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

18 pages, 2304 KiB  
Article
Increase in Akkermansiaceae in Gut Microbiota of Prostate Cancer-Bearing Mice
by Pin-Yu Huang, Yu-Chih Yang, Chun-I Wang, Pei-Wen Hsiao, Hsin-I Chiang and Ting-Wen Chen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(17), 9626; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22179626 - 6 Sep 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3422
Abstract
Gut microbiota are reported to be associated with many diseases, including cancers. Several bacterial taxa have been shown to be associated with cancer development or response to treatment. However, longitudinal microbiota alterations during the development of cancers are relatively unexplored. To better understand [...] Read more.
Gut microbiota are reported to be associated with many diseases, including cancers. Several bacterial taxa have been shown to be associated with cancer development or response to treatment. However, longitudinal microbiota alterations during the development of cancers are relatively unexplored. To better understand how microbiota changes, we profiled the gut microbiota composition from prostate cancer-bearing mice and control mice at five different time points. Distinct gut microbiota differences were found between cancer-bearing mice and control mice. Akkermansiaceae was found to be significantly higher in the first three weeks in cancer-bearing mice, which implies its role in the early stage of cancer colonization. We also found that Bifidobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae were more abundant in the second and last sampling week, respectively. The increments of Akkermansiaceae, Bifidobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae were previously found to be associated with responses to immunotherapy, which suggests links between these bacteria families and cancers. Additionally, our function analysis showed that the bacterial taxa carrying steroid biosynthesis and butirosin and neomycin biosynthesis were increased, whereas those carrying naphthalene degradation decreased in cancer-bearing mice. Our work identified the bacteria taxa altered during prostate cancer progression and provided a resource of longitudinal microbiota profiles during cancer development in a mouse model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 2409 KiB  
Article
Uncovering Microbial Composition in Human Breast Cancer Primary Tumour Tissue Using Transcriptomic RNA-seq
by Dominik Hadzega, Gabriel Minarik, Marian Karaba, Katarina Kalavska, Juraj Benca, Sona Ciernikova, Tatiana Sedlackova, Petra Nemcova, Martin Bohac, Daniel Pindak, Lubos Klucar and Michal Mego
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(16), 9058; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22169058 - 22 Aug 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4034
Abstract
Recent research studies are showing breast tissues as a place where various species of microorganisms can thrive and cannot be considered sterile, as previously thought. We analysed the microbial composition of primary tumour tissue and normal breast tissue and found differences between them [...] Read more.
Recent research studies are showing breast tissues as a place where various species of microorganisms can thrive and cannot be considered sterile, as previously thought. We analysed the microbial composition of primary tumour tissue and normal breast tissue and found differences between them and between multiple breast cancer phenotypes. We sequenced the transcriptome of breast tumours and normal tissues (from cancer-free women) of 23 individuals from Slovakia and used bioinformatics tools to uncover differences in the microbial composition of tissues. To analyse our RNA-seq data (rRNA depleted), we used and tested Kraken2 and Metaphlan3 tools. Kraken2 has shown higher reliability for our data. Additionally, we analysed 91 samples obtained from SRA database, originated in China and submitted by Sichuan University. In breast tissue, the most enriched group were Proteobacteria, then Firmicutes and Actinobacteria for both datasets, in Slovak samples also Bacteroides, while in Chinese samples Cyanobacteria were more frequent. We have observed changes in the microbiome between cancerous and healthy tissues and also different phenotypes of diseases, based on the presence of circulating tumour cells and few other markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

19 pages, 1262 KiB  
Review
Pharmacomicrobiomics in Pediatric Oncology: The Complex Interplay between Commonly Used Drugs and Gut Microbiome
by Davide Leardini, Francesco Venturelli, Francesco Baccelli, Sara Cerasi, Edoardo Muratore, Patrizia Brigidi, Andrea Pession, Arcangelo Prete and Riccardo Masetti
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(23), 15387; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232315387 - 6 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2128
Abstract
The gut microbiome (GM) has emerged in the last few years as a main character in several diseases. In pediatric oncological patients, GM has a role in promoting the disease, modulating the effectiveness of therapies, and determining the clinical outcomes. The therapeutic course [...] Read more.
The gut microbiome (GM) has emerged in the last few years as a main character in several diseases. In pediatric oncological patients, GM has a role in promoting the disease, modulating the effectiveness of therapies, and determining the clinical outcomes. The therapeutic course for most pediatric cancer influences the GM due to dietary modifications and several administrated drugs, including chemotherapies, antibiotics and immunosuppressants. Interestingly, increasing evidence is uncovering a role of the GM on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, defining a bidirectional relationship. Indeed, the pediatric setting presents some contrasts with respect to the adult, since the GM undergoes a constant multifactorial evolution during childhood following external stimuli (such as diet modification during weaning). In this review, we aim to summarize the available evidence of pharmacomicrobiomics in pediatric oncology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1613 KiB  
Review
Microbiota and Oral Cancer as A Complex and Dynamic Microenvironment: A Narrative Review from Etiology to Prognosis
by Pamela Pignatelli, Federica Maria Romei, Danilo Bondi, Michele Giuliani, Adriano Piattelli and Maria Cristina Curia
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(15), 8323; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23158323 - 28 Jul 2022
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 4896
Abstract
A complex balanced equilibrium of the bacterial ecosystems exists in the oral cavity that can be altered by tobacco smoking, psychological stressors, bad dietary habit, and chronic periodontitis. Oral dysbiosis can promote the onset and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) through [...] Read more.
A complex balanced equilibrium of the bacterial ecosystems exists in the oral cavity that can be altered by tobacco smoking, psychological stressors, bad dietary habit, and chronic periodontitis. Oral dysbiosis can promote the onset and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) through the release of toxins and bacterial metabolites, stimulating local and systemic inflammation, and altering the host immune response. During the process of carcinogenesis, the composition of the bacterial community changes qualitatively and quantitatively. Bacterial profiles are characterized by targeted sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in tissue and saliva samples in patients with OSCC. Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus mitis, Fusobacterium periodonticum, Prevotella tannerae, and Prevotella intermedia are the significantly increased bacteria in salivary samples. These have a potential diagnostic application to predict oral cancer through noninvasive salivary screenings. Oral lactic acid bacteria, which are commonly used as probiotic therapy against various disorders, are valuable adjuvants to improve the response to OSCC therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2851 KiB  
Review
The Role of Microbiota in the Immunopathogenesis of Endometrial Cancer
by Małgorzata Sobstyl, Peet Brecht, Anna Sobstyl, Paulina Mertowska and Ewelina Grywalska
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(10), 5756; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23105756 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 5267
Abstract
The female reproductive tract hosts a specific microbiome, which plays a crucial role in sustaining equilibrium and good health. In the majority of reproductive women, the microbiota (all bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other single-celled organisms within the human body) of the vaginal and [...] Read more.
The female reproductive tract hosts a specific microbiome, which plays a crucial role in sustaining equilibrium and good health. In the majority of reproductive women, the microbiota (all bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other single-celled organisms within the human body) of the vaginal and cervical microenvironment are dominated by Lactobacillus species, which benefit the host through symbiotic relationships, in comparison to the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries, which may contain a low-biomass microbiome with a diverse mixture of microorganisms. Although disruption to the balance of the microbiota develops, the altered immune and metabolic signaling may cause an impact on diseases such as cancer. These pathophysiological modifications in the gut–uterus axis may spark gynecological cancers. New information displays that gynecological and gastrointestinal tract dysbiosis (disruption of the microbiota homeostasis) can play an active role in the advancement and metastasis of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Understanding the relationship between microbiota and endometrial cancer is critical for prognosis, diagnosis, prevention, and the development of innovative treatments. Identifying a specific microbiome may become an effective method for characterization of the specific microbiota involved in endometrial carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to summarize the current state of knowledge that describes the correlation of microbiota with endometrial cancer with regard to the formation of immunological pathologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1051 KiB  
Review
Microbiota Alterations and Their Association with Oncogenomic Changes in Pancreatic Cancer Patients
by Heidelinde Sammallahti, Arto Kokkola, Sama Rezasoltani, Reza Ghanbari, Hamid Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Sakari Knuutila, Pauli Puolakkainen and Virinder Kaur Sarhadi
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(23), 12978; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222312978 - 30 Nov 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3801
Abstract
Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive disease with a high mortality and poor prognosis. The human microbiome is a key factor in many malignancies, having the ability to alter host metabolism and immune responses and participate in tumorigenesis. Gut microbes have an influence [...] Read more.
Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive disease with a high mortality and poor prognosis. The human microbiome is a key factor in many malignancies, having the ability to alter host metabolism and immune responses and participate in tumorigenesis. Gut microbes have an influence on physiological functions of the healthy pancreas and are themselves controlled by pancreatic secretions. An altered oral microbiota may colonize the pancreas and cause local inflammation by the action of its metabolites, which may lead to carcinogenesis. The mechanisms behind dysbiosis and PC development are not completely clear. Herein, we review the complex interactions between PC tumorigenesis and the microbiota, and especially the question, whether and how an altered microbiota induces oncogenomic changes, or vice versa, whether cancer mutations have an impact on microbiota composition. In addition, the role of the microbiota in drug efficacy in PC chemo- and immunotherapies is discussed. Possible future scenarios are the intentional manipulation of the gut microbiota in combination with therapy or the utilization of microbial profiles for the noninvasive screening and monitoring of PC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 1833 KiB  
Review
The Role of Gut Microbiota in Overcoming Resistance to Checkpoint Inhibitors in Cancer Patients: Mechanisms and Challenges
by Youssef Bouferraa, Andrea Chedid, Ghid Amhaz, Ahmed El Lakkiss, Deborah Mukherji, Sally Temraz and Ali Shamseddine
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 8036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158036 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3881
Abstract
The introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors has constituted a major revolution in the treatment of patients with cancer. In contrast with the traditional cytotoxic therapies that directly kill tumor cells, this treatment modality enhances the ability of the host’s immune system to recognize [...] Read more.
The introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors has constituted a major revolution in the treatment of patients with cancer. In contrast with the traditional cytotoxic therapies that directly kill tumor cells, this treatment modality enhances the ability of the host’s immune system to recognize and target cancerous cells. While immune checkpoint inhibitors have been effective across multiple cancer types, overcoming resistance remains a key area of ongoing research. The gut microbiota and its role in cancer immunosurveillance have recently become a major field of study. Gut microbiota has been shown to have direct and systemic effects on cancer pathogenesis and hosts anti-tumor immune response. Many studies have also shown that the host microbiota profile plays an essential role in the response to immunotherapy, especially immune checkpoint inhibitors. As such, modulating this microbial environment has offered a potential path to overcome the resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors. In this review, we will talk about the role of microbiota in cancer pathogenesis and immune-system activity. We will also discuss preclinical and clinical studies that have increased our understanding about the roles and the mechanisms through which microbiota influences the response to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 488 KiB  
Review
Hepatocellular Carcinoma Immunotherapy and the Potential Influence of Gut Microbiome
by Sally Temraz, Farah Nassar, Firas Kreidieh, Deborah Mukherji, Ali Shamseddine and Rihab Nasr
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 7800; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22157800 - 21 Jul 2021
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 4542
Abstract
Disruptions in the human gut microbiome have been associated with a cycle of hepatocyte injury and regeneration characteristic of chronic liver disease. Evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can promote the development of hepatocellular carcinoma through the persistence of this inflammation by inducing [...] Read more.
Disruptions in the human gut microbiome have been associated with a cycle of hepatocyte injury and regeneration characteristic of chronic liver disease. Evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can promote the development of hepatocellular carcinoma through the persistence of this inflammation by inducing genetic and epigenetic changes leading to cancer. As the gut microbiome is known for its effect on host metabolism and immune response, it comes as no surprise that the gut microbiome may have a role in the response to therapeutic strategies such as immunotherapy and chemotherapy for liver cancer. Gut microbiota may influence the efficacy of immunotherapy by regulating the responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we review the mechanisms by which gut microbiota influences hepatic carcinogenesis, the immune checkpoint inhibitors currently being used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as summarize the current findings to support the potential critical role of gut microbiome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) immunotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 1413 KiB  
Review
The Role of Microbiota in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Related Biliary Malignancies
by Burcin Özdirik, Tobias Müller, Alexander Wree, Frank Tacke and Michael Sigal
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(13), 6975; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22136975 - 28 Jun 2021
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 7404
Abstract
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an immune-related cholangiopathy characterized by biliary inflammation, cholestasis, and multifocal bile duct strictures. It is associated with high rates of progression to end-stage liver disease as well as a significant risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), gallbladder cancer, and colorectal [...] Read more.
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an immune-related cholangiopathy characterized by biliary inflammation, cholestasis, and multifocal bile duct strictures. It is associated with high rates of progression to end-stage liver disease as well as a significant risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), gallbladder cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. Currently, no effective medical treatment with an impact on the overall survival is available, and liver transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Emerging evidence indicates that gut microbiota is associated with disease pathogenesis. Several studies analyzing fecal and mucosal samples demonstrate a distinct gut microbiome in individuals with PSC compared to healthy controls and individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) without PSC. Experimental mouse and observational human data suggest that a diverse set of microbial functions may be relevant, including microbial metabolites and bacterial processing of pharmacological agents, bile acids, or dietary compounds, altogether driving the intrahepatic inflammation. Despite critical progress in this field over the past years, further functional characterization of the role of the microbiota in PSC and related malignancies is needed. In this review, we discuss the available data on the role of the gut microbiome and elucidate important insights into underlying pathogenic mechanisms and possible microbe-altering interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Cancer 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop