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Special Issue "Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mario Ollero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Université Paris Est Créteil, INSERM, U955 Créteil, France
Interests: lipid signaling; membrane microdomains; protein-lipid interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. David Touboul
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in technologies for lipid analysis have contributed to the consolidation of lipidomics as a particular discipline in metabolomics. This technological development has paralleled the discovery of a broad range of cellular functions associated with lipids, from cell signaling and membrane dynamics, to intercellular communication and the regulation of gene expression. Lipid molecules have been identified as therapeutic targets, therapeutic agents, nutraceuticals and disease biomarkers.

The scope of this Special Issue is to provide the readers from the disciplines of chemistry, biology, as well as connected disciplines with the state-of-the-art of lipid science with regard to the progress in the discovery of bioactive lipid and technical advances in lipidomics.

Authors are invited to submit original research and review articles. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Bioactive lipids in cell biology
  • Lipid molecules as therapeutic agents, nutraceuticals
  • Lipids as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease
  • Lipids in systems biology and metabolic networks
  • New advances in lipid analysis and lipidomics

Prof. Dr. Mario Ollero
Dr. David Touboul
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lipidomics
  • Bioactive lipids
  • Biomarkers
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Metabolomics
  • Membrane dynamics
  • Imaging

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Maresin 1, a Proresolving Lipid Mediator, Ameliorates Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation in Sprague-Dawley Rats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(2), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21020540 - 15 Jan 2020
Abstract
Maresin-1 (MaR1) is a specialized pro-resolving mediator, derived from omega-3 fatty acids, whose functions are to decrease the pro-inflammatory and oxidative mediators, and also to stimulate cell division. We investigated the hepatoprotective actions of MaR1 in a rat model of liver ischemia-reperfusion (IR) [...] Read more.
Maresin-1 (MaR1) is a specialized pro-resolving mediator, derived from omega-3 fatty acids, whose functions are to decrease the pro-inflammatory and oxidative mediators, and also to stimulate cell division. We investigated the hepatoprotective actions of MaR1 in a rat model of liver ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. MaR1 (4 ng/gr body weight) was administered prior to ischemia (1 h) and reperfusion (3 h), and controls received isovolumetric vehicle solution. To analyze liver function, transaminases levels and tissue architecture were assayed, and serum cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, mitotic activity index, and differential levels of NF-κB and Nrf-2 transcription factors, were analyzed. Transaminase, TNF-α levels, and cytoarchitecture were normalized with the administration of MaR1 and associated with changes in NF-κB. IL-6, mitotic activity index, and nuclear translocation of Nrf-2 increased in the MaR1-IR group, which would be associated with hepatoprotection and cell proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that MaR1 alleviated IR liver injury, facilitated by the activation of hepatocyte cell division, increased IL-6 cytokine levels, and the nuclear localization of Nrf-2, with a decrease of NF-κB activity. All of them were related to an improvement of liver injury parameters. These results open the possibility of MaR1 as a potential therapeutic tool in IR and other hepatic pathologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibits Adipogenic Differentiation of C3H10T1/2 Pluripotent Stromal Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(2), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21020412 - 09 Jan 2020
Abstract
Understanding of adipogenesis is important to find remedies for obesity and related disorders. In addition, it is also critical in bone disorders because there is a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis in bone micro-environment. Oxysterols are pro-osteogenic and anti-adipogenic molecules via hedgehog [...] Read more.
Understanding of adipogenesis is important to find remedies for obesity and related disorders. In addition, it is also critical in bone disorders because there is a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis in bone micro-environment. Oxysterols are pro-osteogenic and anti-adipogenic molecules via hedgehog activation in pluripotent bone marrow stomal cells. However, no study has evaluated the role of specific oxysterols in C3H10T1/2 cells, which are a good cell model for studying osteogenesis and adipogenesis in bone-marrows. Thus, we investigated the effects of specific oxysterols on adipogenesis and expression of adipogenic transcripts in C3H10T1/2 cells. Treatment of cells with DMITro significantly induced mRNA expression of Pparγ. This induction was significantly inhibited by 25-HC. The expression of C/cepα, Fabp4 and Lpl was also inhibited by 25-HC. To determine the mechanism by which 25-HC inhibits adipogenesis, the effects of the hedgehog signalling pathway inhibitor, cyclopamine and CUR61414, were evaluated. Treatment of C3H10T1/2 cells with DMITro + cyclopamine or DMITro + CUR61414 for 96h did not modulate adipocyte differentiation; cyclopamine and CUR61414 did not reverse the inhibitory effects of 25-HC, suggesting that the canonical hedgehog signalling may not play a role in the anti-adipogenic effects of 25-HC in C3H10T1/2 cells. In addition, LXR agonist did not inhibit adipogenesis, but 25-HC strongly inhibits adipogenesis of C3H10T1/2 cells. Our observations showed that 25-HC was the most potent oxysterol in inhibiting adipogenesis and the expression of key adipogenic transcripts in C3H10T1/2 cells among the tested oxysterols, suggesting its potential application in providing an intervention in osteoporosis and obesity. We also report that the inhibitory effects of 25-HC on adipogenic differentiation in C3H10T1/2 cells are not mediated by hedgehog signaling and LXR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
Contribution of Palmitic Acid to Epidermal Morphogenesis and Lipid Barrier Formation in Human Skin Equivalents
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 6069; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20236069 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
The outermost barrier layer of the skin is the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. Biosynthesis of barrier lipids occurs de novo in the epidermis or is performed with externally derived lipids. Hence, in vitro developed human [...] Read more.
The outermost barrier layer of the skin is the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. Biosynthesis of barrier lipids occurs de novo in the epidermis or is performed with externally derived lipids. Hence, in vitro developed human skin equivalents (HSEs) are developed with culture medium that is supplemented with free fatty acids (FFAs). Nevertheless, the lipid barrier formation in HSEs remains altered compared to native human skin (NHS). The aim of this study is to decipher the role of medium supplemented saturated FFA palmitic acid (PA) on morphogenesis and lipid barrier formation in HSEs. Therefore, HSEs were developed with 100% (25 μM), 10%, or 1% PA. In HSEs supplemented with reduced PA level, the early differentiation was delayed and epidermal activation was increased. Nevertheless, a similar SC lipid composition in all HSEs was detected. Additionally, the lipid organization was comparable for lamellar and lateral organization, irrespective of PA concentration. As compared to NHS, the level of monounsaturated lipids was increased and the FFA to ceramide ratio was drastically reduced in HSEs. This study describes the crucial role of PA in epidermal morphogenesis and elucidates the role of PA in lipid barrier formation of HSEs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
Changes in Membrane Ceramide Pools in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Short-Term Disuse
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4860; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194860 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
Lipid raft disruption is an early event during skeletal muscle unloading. Ceramide (Cer) serves as a signaling lipid that can contribute to lipid raft disturbance and muscle atrophy. Using biochemical and fluorescent approaches, the distribution of Cer and related molecules in the rat [...] Read more.
Lipid raft disruption is an early event during skeletal muscle unloading. Ceramide (Cer) serves as a signaling lipid that can contribute to lipid raft disturbance and muscle atrophy. Using biochemical and fluorescent approaches, the distribution of Cer and related molecules in the rat soleus muscle subjected to 12 h of hindlimb suspension (HS) was studied. HS led to upregulation of TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1), Cer-producing enzymes, and acid and neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) in detergent-resistant membranes (lipid rafts), which was accompanied by an increase in Cer and a decrease in sphingomyelin in this membrane fraction. Fluorescent labeling indicated increased Cer in the sarcoplasm as well as the junctional (synaptic) and extrajunctional compartments of the suspended muscles. Also, a loss of membrane asymmetry (a hallmark of membrane disturbance) was induced by HS. Pretreatment with clomipramine, a functional inhibitor of acid SMase, counteracted HS-mediated changes in the Cer/sphingomyelin ratio and acid SMase abundance as well as suppressed Cer accumulation in the intracellular membranes of junctional and extrajunctional regions. However, the elevation of plasma membrane Cer and disturbance of the membrane asymmetry were suppressed only in the junctional compartment. We suggest that acute HS leads to TNFR1 and SMase upregulation in the lipid raft fraction and deposition of Cer throughout the sarcolemma and intracellularly. Clomipramine-mediated downregulation of acid SMase can suppress Cer accumulation in all compartments, excluding the extrajunctional plasma membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
Novel Markers of the Metabolic Impact of Exogenous Retinoic Acid with A Focus on Acylcarnitines and Amino Acids
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(15), 3640; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153640 - 25 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the carboxylic form of vitamin A, lowers body weight in rodents by promoting oxidative metabolism in multiple tissues including white and brown adipose tissues. We aimed to identify novel markers of the metabolic impact of ATRA through [...] Read more.
Treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the carboxylic form of vitamin A, lowers body weight in rodents by promoting oxidative metabolism in multiple tissues including white and brown adipose tissues. We aimed to identify novel markers of the metabolic impact of ATRA through targeted blood metabolomics analyses, with a focus on acylcarnitines and amino acids. Blood was obtained from mice treated with a high ATRA dose (50 mg/kg body weight/day, subcutaneous injection) or placebo (controls) during the 4 days preceding collection. LC-MS/MS analyses with a focus on acylcarnitines and amino acids were conducted on plasma and PBMC. Main results showed that, relative to controls, ATRA-treated mice had in plasma: increased levels of carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and longer acylcarnitine species; decreased levels of citrulline, and increased global arginine bioavailability ratio for nitric oxide synthesis; increased levels of creatine, taurine and docosahexaenoic acid; and a decreased n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio. While some of these features likely reflect the stimulation of lipid mobilization and oxidation promoted by ATRA treatment systemically, other may also play a causal role underlying ATRA actions. The results connect ATRA to specific nutrition-modulated biochemical pathways, and suggest novel mechanisms of action of vitamin A-derived retinoic acid on metabolic health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Lipids and Lipidomics 2020)
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