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Special Issue "Centenarians—A Model to Study the Molecular Basis of Lifespan and Healthspan"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Annibale Puca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Universita di Salerno, Salerno, Italy and IRCCS Multimedica, Milano, Italy
Interests: genetics of exceptional longevity; immunological phenotype of exceptional long living individuals; BPIFB4, a longevity associated protein, and its isoforms in health and diseases
Prof. Calogero Caruso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathobiology and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
Interests: Ageing; Age-related diseases; Centenarians; Immunogenetics; Immunosenescence; Inflammation; Longevity; Successful ageing; Unsuccessful ageing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The extraordinary rise in the elderly population in the Western world underscores the importance of studies on ageing and longevity to decrease the medical, economic, and social problems associated with the increased number of non-autonomous individuals affected by invalidating pathologies.

Centenarians show relatively good health, being able to perform their routine daily life and to escape or delay age-related diseases. The aim of this Special Issue is to understand, through a “positive biology” approach, how to prevent, reduce, or delay frailty and disability amongst the elderly. Indeed, rather than making diseases the central focus of study, “positive biology” seeks to understand the causes of positive phenotypes and explain the biological mechanisms of health and well-being.

In this Special Issue, studies on different aspects of centenarians are welcome.

Original research papers and reviews are equally welcome and may involve in vitro and in vivo studies in different cells and organisms.

Dr. Annibale Puca
Prof. Calogero Caruso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epidemiological aspects of longevity
  • genetics of longevity
  • epigenetics of longevity
  • immunological phenotype of long living individuals
  • phenotypic aspects
  • diet and lifestyle of long living individuals
  • BPIFB4, a longevity-associated protein and its isoforms in health and diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Caenorhabditis Elegans and Probiotics Interactions from a Prolongevity Perspective
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5020; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205020 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Probiotics exert beneficial effects on host health through different mechanisms of action, such as production of antimicrobial substances, competition with pathogens, enhancement of host mucosal barrier integrity and immunomodulation. In the context of ageing, which is characterized by several physiological alterations leading to [...] Read more.
Probiotics exert beneficial effects on host health through different mechanisms of action, such as production of antimicrobial substances, competition with pathogens, enhancement of host mucosal barrier integrity and immunomodulation. In the context of ageing, which is characterized by several physiological alterations leading to a low grade inflammatory status called inflammageing, evidences suggest a potential prolongevity role of probiotics. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying anti-ageing effects requires the use of simple model systems. To this respect, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans represents a suitable model organism for the study of both host-microbe interactions and for ageing studies, because of conserved signaling pathways and host defense mechanisms involved in the regulation of its lifespan. Therefore, this review analyses the impact of probiotics on C. elegans age-related parameters, with particular emphasis on oxidative stress, immunity, inflammation and protection from pathogen infections. The picture emerging from our analysis highlights that several probiotic strains are able to exert anti-ageing effects in nematodes by acting on common molecular pathways, such as insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IIS) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In this perspective, C. elegans appears to be advantageous for shedding light on key mechanisms involved in host prolongevity in response to probiotics supplementation. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Royal Jelly and Its Components Promote Healthy Aging and Longevity: From Animal Models to Humans
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4662; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194662 - 20 Sep 2019
Abstract
Aging is a natural phenomenon that occurs in all living organisms. In humans, aging is associated with lowered overall functioning and increased mortality out of the risk for various age-related diseases. Hence, researchers are pushed to find effective natural interventions that can promote [...] Read more.
Aging is a natural phenomenon that occurs in all living organisms. In humans, aging is associated with lowered overall functioning and increased mortality out of the risk for various age-related diseases. Hence, researchers are pushed to find effective natural interventions that can promote healthy aging and extend lifespan. Royal jelly (RJ) is a natural product that is fed to bee queens throughout their entire life. Thanks to RJ, bee queens enjoy an excellent reproductive function and lengthened lifespan compared with bee workers, despite the fact that they have the same genome. This review aimed to investigate the effect of RJ and/or its components on lifespan/healthspan in various species by evaluating the most relevant studies. Moreover, we briefly discussed the positive effects of RJ on health maintenance and age-related disorders in humans. Whenever possible, we explored the metabolic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms through which RJ can modulate age-related mechanisms to extend lifespan. RJ and its ingredients—proteins and their derivatives e.g., royalactin; lipids e.g., 10-hydroxydecenoic acid; and vitamins e.g., pantothenic acid—improved healthspan and extended lifespan in worker honeybees Apis mellifera, Drosophila Melanogaster flies, Gryllus bimaculatus crickets, silkworms, Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes, and mice. The longevity effect was attained via various mechanisms: downregulation of insulin-like growth factors and targeting of rapamycin, upregulation of the epidermal growth factor signaling, dietary restriction, and enhancement of antioxidative capacity. RJ and its protein and lipid ingredients have the potential to extend lifespan in various creatures and prevent senescence of human tissues in cell cultures. These findings pave the way to inventing specific RJ anti-aging drugs. However, much work is needed to understand the effect of RJ interactions with microbiome, diet, activity level, gender, and other genetic variation factors that affect healthspan and longevity. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Title: Caenorhabditis elegans and probiotics interactions in a prolongevity perspective

Authors Name: Daniela Uccelletti; Marianna Roselli; et al.

 

  1. Title: Food allergy and aging

Authors Name: Massimo De Martinis; et al.

Abstract: All over the world there is an increase in the overall survival of the population and the number of elderly people. The incidence of allergic reactions is also rising worldwide. Until recently, allergies, and in particolar food allergies, was regarded as pediatric problems, since some of them start in early childhood and may spontaneously disappear in adulthood. It is being discovered that, on the contrary, these problems are increasingly affecting even the elderly. Along with other diseases that are considered characteristics of advanced age, such as cardiovascular, dysmetabolic, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and oncological diseases, even food allergies are increasingly frequent in the elderly. Food allergy is a pleiomorphic and multifactorial disease, characterized by an abnormal immune response and an impaired gut barrier function. The elderly exibit distinct food allergy phenotypes, and diagnosis is difficult due to frequent co-morbidities and uncertainty in the interpretation of in vitro and in vivo tests. Several factors render the elderly susceptible to food allergy, including physiological changes of aging, decline in gut barrier function, skewing of adaptive immunity to a Th2 response, dysregulation of innate immune cells, and age-related changes of gut microbioma. Aging is accompanied by a progressive remodeling of immune system functions, leading to an increased pro-inflammatory status wheretype 1 cytokines are quantitatively dominant. However, serum IgE levels and Th2 type cytokine production have also been found increased in the elderly, suggesting that the type 2 cytokine pattern is not necessarily defective in older age. Dysfunctional dendritic cells in the gut, defects in secretory IgA and decreased T regulatory function in the elderly also play important roles in food allergy development. We address herein the main immunologic aspects of aging, according to the presence of food allergy.

 

  1. Title: The aging immune system and nutritional interventions

Authors Name: Adriaan A. van Beek; et al.

 

  1. Title: A clinical study about hormone change for older adults exercise and combined nutritional treat

Authors Name: Min-Seong, Ha; et al.

 

  1. Title: A clinical study about hormone change for older adults exercise and combined nutritional treat

Authors Name: Min-Seong, Ha; et al.

 

  1. Authors Name: Michael D. Burton; et al.
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