Special Issue "Geo-Information for Developing Urban Infrastructures"

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jochen Schiewe
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Guest Editor
HafenCity University Hamburg, Lab for Geoinformatics and Geovisualization (g2lab), Überseeallee 16, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
Interests: cartographic algorithms; geovisual analysis; uncertainty modeling and visualization; usability research; journalistic cartography
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Population growth, on the one hand, and the need for environmental sustainability, on the other, are only two but typical counterproductive factors influencing the development of cities. This Special Issue addresses innovative methods for geo-information fusion, analysis, and visualization to support complex actions for planning and improving a livable built environment on a short and long term basis. In this context, no holistic concepts—such as from “Smart Cities”—should be treated, but rather concrete approaches that refer to selected urban infrastructures such as transport, communication, energy supply or disposal. The described methods should support experts in their decisions; however, the perspective of citizens and politicians should also be considered within the development process.

Prof. Dr. Jochen Schiewe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban infrastructure
  • built environment
  • decision support
  • geo-information analysis
  • geo-visualization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatio-Temporal Land-Use Changes and the Response in Landscape Pattern to Hemeroby in a Resource-Based City
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9010020 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Hemeroby is an integrated indicator used to measure the impact and degree of all human interventions on ecological components or ecosystems. The constant exploitation of resources is a strong interference of human beings to the natural environment. With the depletion of non-renewable resources, [...] Read more.
Hemeroby is an integrated indicator used to measure the impact and degree of all human interventions on ecological components or ecosystems. The constant exploitation of resources is a strong interference of human beings to the natural environment. With the depletion of non-renewable resources, some cities with resource exploitation as their main industry—“resource-based cities”—are facing great development pressure. In order to quantify the impact of human disturbance on the natural environment and provide some scientific support for policy makers of the resource-based city, we used remote sensing images and landscape pattern metrics, introduced the synthetic hemeroby index model and analyzed the relationship between human disturbance and landscape pattern during 1990–2017. The results showed that: (1) The hemeroby in Daqing continued to rise during 1990–2017, and the main factor was the continuous expansion of the construction land and the reclamation of farmland. (2) In the areas with different hemeroby, there were significant differences in landscape pattern. In the areas with high-level hemeroby, the heterogeneity of landscape pattern was low, the aggregation among patches was high, and the shape of patches was regular, whereas the landscape pattern in the areas with medium-level hemeroby was just opposite. Although the heterogeneity of landscape pattern and the aggregation among patches were high in the areas with low-level hemeroby, the complexity of landscape was low and the shape of patches was regular. (3) In the temporal dimension, the increase of hemeroby contributed to the complexity of patch shape, the decrease of the aggregation among patches, and the fragmentation of landscape pattern. In the spatial dimension, the response in landscape pattern to human disturbance was relatively insensitive in the areas with low-level hemeroby, and this response was basically same in the high-level hemeroby and the whole study areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information for Developing Urban Infrastructures)
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Open AccessArticle
An Approach for the Analysis of the Accessibility of Fire Hydrants in Urban Territories
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(12), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8120587 - 17 Dec 2019
Abstract
Globally, fire causes considerable losses that can be alleviated by taking appropriate actions facilitated by systems supported by geo-information technologies. This research focuses upon the development of an approach for planning urban infrastructures, and particularly in the accessibility of fire hydrants. Accessibility of [...] Read more.
Globally, fire causes considerable losses that can be alleviated by taking appropriate actions facilitated by systems supported by geo-information technologies. This research focuses upon the development of an approach for planning urban infrastructures, and particularly in the accessibility of fire hydrants. Accessibility of fire hydrants’ infrastructure in urban territories is one of the key elements in fire risk management and public safety. The main result of the research is a comprehensive and structured Geographic Information Systems (GISs)-based dataset for the fast and more efficient planning of fire hydrants in urban territories. The proposed framework for data collection and processing was used to determine the distribution of hydrants, location of fire brigade stations and areas and to demonstrate the capabilities of the existing municipal fire extinguishing systems in Vilnius City, Lithuania. Later on, research on fire hydrants’ accessibility, analysis of the location of protected and unprotected urban territories and marking of unprotected buildings, was carried out. The resulting map of unprotected urban territories can be of great benefit for understanding fire risks and offering more effective ways for fire risk management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information for Developing Urban Infrastructures)
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