Special Issue "Geo-Information Science in Planning and Development of Smart Cities"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Borruso
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Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Business, Mathematics and Statistics "Bruno De Finetti", University of Trieste, Via Tigor, 22, 34124 Trieste, Italy
Tel. +39 040 558 7008
Interests: urban geography; smart cities; GIS; transport geography; urban planning; regional planning; networks; migrations; mobility; spatial analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ginevra Balletto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DICAAR, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Via Marengo 3, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: urban and regional planning; cultural heritage; urban governance and urban policies; urban governance and urban policies (hard and soft); sport in the city
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Michele Campagna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DICAAR, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Via Marengo 3, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: spatial planning and geodesign, metaplanning, strategic environmental assessment (SEA); planning support systems (PSS); social media geographic information (SMGI)
Prof. Dr. Andrea Favretto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Studies, University of Trieste, Trieste, Via del Lazzaretto Vecchio, 8, 34123 Trieste, Italy
Tel. ++390405583641
Interests: Remote Sensing; GIS; Cartography; History of Cartography; Virtual Globes; Balloon Mapping
Prof. Dr. Giovanni Mauro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Human Studies, University of Trieste, Trieste, Via del Lazzaretto Vecchio, 8, 34123 Trieste, Italy
Interests: urban geography; sustainability; GIS; Remote Sensing; Balloon Mapping; Social Geography; Migrations; Participatory Geography
Prof. Dr. Beniamino Murgante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, 10 Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: spatial planning; spatial simulation; geodemographics; geographic data analysis of socioeconomic and population data; planning 2.0; participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cities represent the major factor of human footprints on the Earth, with the majority of people today living in cities and urbanized areas. Geographical data and information are today widely spread and available, and their production runs at an unprecedented speed. These two considerations represent the starting point for reflecting about cities, urbanized territories, and the relations with the surrounding and neighboring territories. Humans—and their machines—produce geographical data that can be used to study territories and obtain information to propose solutions for spatial issues. In such a direction is also the current debate on Smart Cities and on the technological solutions that can be used to tackle human needs and to support smart collaborative design and decision making in urbanized environments. This Special Issue is intended to focus the attention of scholars on geographical information science and its applications on the ways in which, today, it can provide useful insights in analyzing urban areas and phenomena, as well as understanding how humans interact within them and how these areas interact and relate with other realities in order to support smart design. Central areas–peripheries, as well as urban–rural relationships, will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Borruso
Prof. Dr. Ginevra Balletto
Prof. Dr. Michele Campagna
Prof. Dr. Andrea Favretto
Prof. Dr. Giovanni Mauro
Prof. Dr. Beniamino Murgante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart cities
  • urban planning
  • urban geography
  • rural–urban
  • GIS
  • remote sensing
  • geodesign

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Data-Driven Framework for Walkability Measurement with Open Data: A Case Study of Triple Cities, New York
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9010036 - 09 Jan 2020
Abstract
Walking is the most common, environment-friendly, and inexpensive type of physical activity. To perform in-depth walkability analysis, one option is to objectively evaluate different aspects of built environment related to walkability. In this study, we proposed a computational framework for walkability measurement using [...] Read more.
Walking is the most common, environment-friendly, and inexpensive type of physical activity. To perform in-depth walkability analysis, one option is to objectively evaluate different aspects of built environment related to walkability. In this study, we proposed a computational framework for walkability measurement using open data. Three major steps of this framework include the web scrapping of publicly available online data, determining varying weights of variables, and generating a synthetic walkability index. The results suggest three major conclusions. First, the proposed framework provides an explicit mechanism for walkability measurement. Second, the synthetic walkability index from this framework is comparable to Walk Score, and it tends to have a slightly higher sensitivity, especially in highly walkable areas in urban core. Third, this framework was effectively applied in a metropolitan area that contains three small cities that together represent a small, old shrinking region, which extends the topical area in the literature. This framework has the potential to quantify walkability in any city, especially cities with a small population where walkability has rarely been studied, or those having no quantification indicator. For such areas, researchers can calculate the synthetic walkability index based on this framework, to assist urban planners, community leaders, health officials, and policymakers in their practices to improve the walking environment of their communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Science in Planning and Development of Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
The Unbalanced Analysis of Economic Urbanization—A Case Study of Typical Cities in China
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9010013 - 25 Dec 2019
Abstract
In the process of economic urbanization, because of competition among cities, agglomerations and polarization of regional economies are produced. This paper studies the urban polarization with Chinese characteristics and the regional economic urbanization, which include the imbalance under the influence of different geographical [...] Read more.
In the process of economic urbanization, because of competition among cities, agglomerations and polarization of regional economies are produced. This paper studies the urban polarization with Chinese characteristics and the regional economic urbanization, which include the imbalance under the influence of different geographical factors between the east and west of China and the imbalance under the comprehensive influence of natural and human factors in the province. The urban economic polarization index (UEPI) is constructed to describe the regional imbalance caused by the economic polarization of capital cities in China. The purpose is to explore the polarization of provincial capitals in their respective provinces and to reveal the strength and evolution of their role in the imbalance of economic urbanization. Then, combined with relevant analysis of natural and socio-economic background data, the induced factors and the mechanism of urban polarization are diagnosed. The results show the following: (1) The UEPI can accurately measure the polarization level of provincial capitals through the calculation of typical cities. (2) Based on the UEPI, capital cities can be divided into four categories, which include inapparent, obvious, prominent, and striking. Different cities have different effects on the imbalance in economic urbanization. (3) The main inducing factors of urban polarization are the resource environment, policy system, industrial structure, investment, scientific and technological innovation, location, and extroversion. The policy system is often an important link that integrates and adjusts various factors to form a comprehensive driving mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Science in Planning and Development of Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Ranking of Illegal Buildings Close to Rivers: A Proposal, Its Implementation and Preliminary Validation
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(11), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8110510 - 11 Nov 2019
Abstract
Illegal buildings (IBs) are a dramatic problem in developing countries due to the population explosion, but, at the same time, they represent an unsolved issue in several states usually called advanced (as, for instance, Italy). To protect the environment, and hence, people, land [...] Read more.
Illegal buildings (IBs) are a dramatic problem in developing countries due to the population explosion, but, at the same time, they represent an unsolved issue in several states usually called advanced (as, for instance, Italy). To protect the environment, and hence, people, land authorities must respond to the challenge of IBs by demolishing them. However, in countries where the phenomenon is extended, it is indispensable to provide those figures with an IT tool that returns to them an order of demolition. Through remote sensing methods, suspicious buildings can be identified with a good approximation, but they are all ex aequo. The research summarized in this paper formalizes a two-steps method to deal with a specific category of IBs, namely, those that are close to rivers. These buildings are of special interest to land authorities because people living or simply working inside them are exposed to the flood hazard that each year claims many victims all over the world. The first step of the method computes the census of the IBs located close to rivers, while the second step computes the ranking of these buildings. The ranking may be used as the IBs demolition order. In the paper, it is also proposed the structure of a Spatial DataBase (briefly, SDB) that is suitable to store the input data necessary to solve the problem, as well as the final ranking. Spatial SQL queries against the SDB implement the proposed two-steps method. A real case study was carried out to make a preliminary validation of the method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Science in Planning and Development of Smart Cities)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Strengthening Participation using Interactive Planning Support Systems: A Systematic Review
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9010049 - 15 Jan 2020
Abstract
Interactive Planning Support Systems (PSS) implemented on a maptable are deemed suitable to support participatory planning processes. They are supposed to facilitate exchange of knowledge between stakeholders, consensus building among them, and group-learning processes. In this systematic review, based on 16 case studies [...] Read more.
Interactive Planning Support Systems (PSS) implemented on a maptable are deemed suitable to support participatory planning processes. They are supposed to facilitate exchange of knowledge between stakeholders, consensus building among them, and group-learning processes. In this systematic review, based on 16 case studies using interactive PSS, we analyze how these have contributed to the goal of strengthening stakeholder participation. To this end, we first elicit details of the interactive PSS and the related participatory processes. In the second step, we analyze how and what the studies report, as the impacts on participation. Results show that tools and applications have become more sophisticated over time and goals of the studies changed from collaboratively designing interventions to observing and understanding how the application of such tools contributes to improved plan outcomes and group-based learning. All interactive PSS succeeded to facilitate intensive stakeholder collaboration. However, many studies lack a proper framework for investigating its impacts on participation and therefore assess these rather incidentally based on implicit assumptions. Thus, a significant outcome of this review is an evaluation framework, which allows the structural assessment of the impacts of interactive PSS on stakeholder participation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Information Science in Planning and Development of Smart Cities)
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