Special Issue "Global Grid Systems"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Faramarz F. Samavati
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Professor, Associate Head (Graduate Director), Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W. Calgary, AB T2N 1N4. Canada
Interests: Computer Graphics, Geometric Modeling, Visualization, and 3D Imaging
Dr. Troy Alderson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PhD Candidate, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W. Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
Interests: computer graphics, geometric modeling, subdivision, multiresolution, vector data processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in data capturing technologies are causing an explosion in the quantity of geospatial data that is collected every day, all of which must be integrated together into a common reference model for meaningful analyses to be performed. Traditionally, the reference model is a 2D map formed by projecting the spheroidal Earth and its data onto a flat plane.

To foster a stronger understanding of the Earth, geospatial data may be assigned and retrieved using a 3D model of the Earth, rather than a 2D map. The use of dscrete global grid systems (DGGSs) is an emerging approach to the creation of such 3D models. DGGS are a discretization of the Earth into hierarchical sets of highly regular cells, each of which represents a distinct region of the Earth to which data may be assigned. In this model, each cell has a unique index that is used to reference geospatial information related to that cell. In order to support multiple spatial resolutions, cells are hierarchically subdivided using simple refinements. The open geospatial consortium (OGC) has developed an abstract specification of DGGSs, for use by the geospatial community.

There is a vast scope of research to be investigated in relation to DGGS. In this Special Issue, we invite research papers related to the following:

  • Fundamental and geometric aspects of various global grids;
  • Volumetric DGSS;
  • Time-varying grids;
  • Physical simulation of DGGS;
  • Novel geospatial visualization of DGSS;
  • Revisiting GIS algorithms in DGSS;
  • Practical use cases in DGGS; and
  • Efficient/novel implementations of DGGS.

Expressions of interest and/or questions are welcomed via email to [email protected] The journal and the Editors are committed to a rapid and thorough review process, and papers will be published on a rolling basis.

Prof. Dr. Faramarz Samavati
Mr. Troy Alderson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Discrete global grid systems
  • Time-varying and volumetric data
  • Geospatial data representations
  • Geospatial data processing
  • Geospatial data visualization.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Lattice Quad-Tree Indexing Algorithm for a Hexagonal Discrete Global Grid System
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(2), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9020083 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
Hexagonal discrete global grid systems are the preferred data models supporting multisource geospatial information fusion. Related research has aroused widespread concern in the academic community, and hierarchical indexing algorithms are one of the main research focuses. In this paper, we propose an algorithm [...] Read more.
Hexagonal discrete global grid systems are the preferred data models supporting multisource geospatial information fusion. Related research has aroused widespread concern in the academic community, and hierarchical indexing algorithms are one of the main research focuses. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for indexing the cell of a ringed spatial area based on a hexagonal lattice quad-tree (HLQT) structure and the indexing characteristics. First, we design a single-resolution indexing algorithm in which indexing starts from the initial quad tree and expands ring by ring using coding operations, and a quad-tree structure is applied to accelerate this process. Second, the hierarchical indexing algorithm is implemented based on single-resolution indexing, and a pyramid hierarchical model is established. Finally, we perform comparison experiments with existing algorithms. The results of the experiments indicate that the single-level indexing efficiency of the proposed algorithm is approximately twice that of the traditional method and that the hierarchical indexing efficiency is approximately 67 times that of the traditional method. These findings verify the feasibility and superiority of the algorithm proposed in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Grid Systems)
Open AccessArticle
Collision Detection for UAVs Based on GeoSOT-3D Grids
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(7), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8070299 - 15 Jul 2019
Abstract
The increasing number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has led to challenges related to solving the collision problem to ensure air traffic safety. The traditional approaches employed for collision detection suffer from two main drawbacks: first, the computational burden of a pairwise calculation [...] Read more.
The increasing number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has led to challenges related to solving the collision problem to ensure air traffic safety. The traditional approaches employed for collision detection suffer from two main drawbacks: first, the computational burden of a pairwise calculation increases exponentially with an increasing number of spatial entities; second, existing grid-based approaches are unsuitable for complicated scenarios with a large number of objects moving at high speeds. In the proposed model, we first identified UAVs and other spatial objects with GeoSOT-3D grids. Second, the nonrelational spatial database was initialized with a multitable strategy, and spatiotemporal data were inserted with the GeoSOT-3D grid codes as the primary key. Third, the collision detection procedure was transformed from a pairwise calculation to a multilevel query. Four simulation experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed collision detection model for UAVs in different environments. The results also indicated that 64 m GeoSOT-3D grids are the most suitable basic grid size, and the reduction in the time consumption compared with traditional methods reached approximately 50–80% in different scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Grid Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
A Low-Altitude Flight Conflict Detection Algorithm Based on a Multilevel Grid Spatiotemporal Index
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(6), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8060289 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
Flight conflict detection is fundamental to flight dispatch, trajectory planning, and flight safety control. An ever-increasing aircraft population and higher speeds, particularly the emergence of hypersonic/supersonic aircrafts, are challenging the timeliness and accuracy of flight conflict detection. Traditional trajectory conflict detection algorithms rely [...] Read more.
Flight conflict detection is fundamental to flight dispatch, trajectory planning, and flight safety control. An ever-increasing aircraft population and higher speeds, particularly the emergence of hypersonic/supersonic aircrafts, are challenging the timeliness and accuracy of flight conflict detection. Traditional trajectory conflict detection algorithms rely on traversing multivariate equations of every two trajectories, in order to yield the conflict result and involve extensive computation and high algorithmic complexity; these algorithms are often unable to provide the flight conflict solutions required quickly enough. In this paper, we present a novel, low-altitude flight conflict detection algorithm, based on the multi-level grid spatiotemporal index, that transforms the traditional trajectory-traversing multivariate conflict computation into a grid conflict state query of distributed grid databases. Essentially, this is a method of exchanging "storage space" for "computational time". First, we build the spatiotemporal subdivision and encoding model based on the airspace. The model describes the geometries of the trajectories, low-altitude obstacles, or dangerous fields and identifies the grid with grid codes. Next, we design a database table structure of the grid and create a grid database. Finally, we establish a multilevel grid spatiotemporal index, design a query optimization scheme, and examine the flight conflict detection results from the grid database. Experimental verification confirms that the computation efficiency of our algorithm is one order of magnitude higher than those of traditional methods. Our algorithm can perform real-time (dynamic/static) conflict detection on both individual aircraft and aircraft flying in formation with more efficient trajectory planning and airspace utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Grid Systems)
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