Special Issue "Violence in the Workplace"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. María del Mar Molero Jurado
Website
Guest Editor
University of Almería, Ctra. de Sacramento s/n, 04120, Almería, Spain
Interests: psychology of sustainability; engagement work; occupational health; psychosocial; organizational environments; personality; emotional intelligence; burnout; emotions; public health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. José Jesús Gázquez Linares
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychology, Universidad de Almería, Calle Universidad de Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain
2. Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Av. Pedro de Valdivia 425, Providencia, Región Metropolitana, Chile
Interests: psychology of sustainability; engagement work; occupational health; psychosocial; organizational environments; personality; aggressive behavior; emotional intelligence; emotional intelligence; burnout, public health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mobbing consists of violent behavior a person or group exerts against another in the workplace. This type of behavior traditionally refers to psychological abuse, intimidation, trauma, etc. Today, several different expressions are used to refer to the same concept, such as bullying, conflict in the workplace or violence in the workplace. As in other contexts, such violent conduct by family, users, superiors, fellow workers, etc. can have severe consequences to both the individual and the institution. Mobbing in the workplace has been identified as a growing problem in public health, a job stress factor in professionals. For example, according to the World Health Organization, there is a global shortage of 4.3 million healthcare workers. The negative consequences of mobbing to workers has been analyzed in a number of studies, revealing high rates of depression, anxiety, obsessive thinking or psychosomatic disorders. In some cases, it has been observed that victims of mobbing can even experience posttraumatic stress, with symptoms comparable to those of victims of war. The presence of violence has been associated with higher substance use, with severe consequences to the victim’s physical and mental health, influencing their professional practice. Neither should this Special Issue omit the presence of bullying by other workers, which is extremely harmful to those involved (as well as other workers who are “spectators”), for the quality atenttion and also for the profession in general. It is important to understand how and why mobbing occurs and analyze the negative effects of intimidation and whether they can be reduced. However, in spite of the attention that research has given this subject, there is a more specific type of mobbing among members of the same work team, which in recent years has been shown to be one of the main concerns of professionals. With this Special Issue, we invite you to submit articles reporting on high-quality original research or reviews which provide new solid discoveries widening the current state of knowledge on violence in the workplace. Preference will be given to articles which analyze prevalence, as well as risk and protection factors, and which further propose action to avoid the presence of violence in the workplace. All manuscripts will be reviewed by experts in the field and must be received no later than end of December 2020.

Dr. María del Carmen Pérez-Fuentes
Dr. María del Mar Molero Jurado
Prof. Dr. José Jesús Gázquez Linares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • violence
  • workplace
  • mobbing
  • risk and protection factors
  • anxiety
  • stress

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Workplace Mobbing in Polish and Lithuanian Organisations with Regard to Corporate Social Responsibility
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2944; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082944 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The ‘mobbing’ phenomenon is regarded as the actions or behaviour referring to an employee or directed against an employee, comprising persistent and drawn-out harassment or intimidation of that employee. This phenomenon causes substantial negative workplace consequences, but, above all, one should stress the [...] Read more.
The ‘mobbing’ phenomenon is regarded as the actions or behaviour referring to an employee or directed against an employee, comprising persistent and drawn-out harassment or intimidation of that employee. This phenomenon causes substantial negative workplace consequences, but, above all, one should stress the consequences for the victims, which are devastating. This has been observed in a variety of organisations, regardless of the sector and country. Given these facts, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of workplace mobbing in Polish and Lithuanian organisations with regard to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The research sample included a group of 823 entities operating in both countries in both the private and public sectors (410 from Lithuania and 413 from Poland). A closed-type questionnaire was used in the survey. Several research methods including factor analysis, Cronbach’s alpha, Spearman–Brown, factor loading, and total item correlation were used in our study. The results achieved showed that there were both similarities as well as differences between the analysed organisations. More specifically, our research revealed that: (1) Employee attitude to CSR depends on the company’s sector of activity and the country; (2) In Poland, workplace mobbing is more prevalent in the public sector than in the private, whilst in Lithuania there were no substantial differences; (3) Organisations that implemented the CSR concept showed less imposed mobbing prevalence; and (4) Employees who faced mobbing in the workplace had worse relationships with clients and users of the company’s services/products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence in the Workplace)
Open AccessArticle
Job Demand, Job Control, and Impaired Mental Health in the Experience of Workplace Bullying Behavior: A Two-Wave Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041358 - 20 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Workplace bullying is an extreme social stressor at work leading to a severe deterioration of health amongst its targets. Research has revealed two important orders of factors that may trigger workplace bullying: Poor working conditions and individual factors such as impaired mental health [...] Read more.
Workplace bullying is an extreme social stressor at work leading to a severe deterioration of health amongst its targets. Research has revealed two important orders of factors that may trigger workplace bullying: Poor working conditions and individual factors such as impaired mental health that determine a personal psychological vulnerability to bullying. However, research has rarely investigated their role simultaneously. In response, we investigated whether the relationship between poor working conditions (i.e., high job demand) at time 1 (T1) and the experience of bullying at time 2 (T2) is strengthened by experiencing symptoms of impaired mental health at T1. We also tested whether job control—which contributes to better working conditions—at T1 moderates the relationship between job demand at T1 and bullying at T2. Participants (N = 235) were workers in the health sector. The time lag between T1 and T2 was one year. Cross-lagged path analysis revealed that the relationship between job demand at T1 and the experience of bullying behavior at T2 was strengthened by T1 impaired mental health. This suggests that considering both working conditions and individual factors together may be important for reaching a better understanding of the development of bullying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence in the Workplace)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Prevalence of Workplace Physical Violence against Health Care Professionals by Patients and Visitors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010299 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
Workplace physical violence against health care professionals perpetrated by patients and visitors has been a persistent problem worldwide. Prevalence estimates varied vastly across studies and there was a lack of quantitative syntheses of prevalence studies. This review aimed to quantify pooled one-year prevalence [...] Read more.
Workplace physical violence against health care professionals perpetrated by patients and visitors has been a persistent problem worldwide. Prevalence estimates varied vastly across studies and there was a lack of quantitative syntheses of prevalence studies. This review aimed to quantify pooled one-year prevalence estimates at the global and regional levels. A systematic literature search was performed in the databases of PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Embase between 1 January 2000 and 8 October 2018. Studies providing information about one-year prevalence of self-reported workplace physical violence against health care professionals perpetrated by patients or visitors were included. Heterogeneity between studies was evaluated using Cochran’s chi-squared test (Cochran’s Q) and I2 values. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to explore heterogeneity. A total of 65 eligible studies reported one-year prevalence estimates for 61,800 health care professionals from 30 countries. The pooled one-year prevalence of workplace physical violence against health care professionals perpetrated by patients or visitors was 19.33% (95% confidence interval (CI): 16.49–22.53%) and the overall heterogeneity was high across studies. We noted geographic and staff categories variations for prevalence estimates through subgroup analysis. The meta-regression showed that sample size, type of health care setting, and quality score were significant moderators for heterogeneity. One in five health care professionals experienced workplace physical violence perpetrated by patients or visitors worldwide annually. Practical intervention was needed to ensure safety of health care professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence in the Workplace)
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