Special Issue "Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Organizational Behaviors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. María del Mar Molero Jurado
Website
Guest Editor
University of Almería, Ctra. de Sacramento s/n, 04120, Almería, Spain
Interests: psychology of sustainability; engagement work; occupational health; psychosocial; organizational environments; personality; emotional intelligence; burnout; emotions; public health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When we think of stress, we immediately associate it with a lack of availability of appropriate personal and social resources to meet challenges. The exhaustion of resources to fulfil the work activity can increase the sensation of stress, until the well-known burnout syndrome is caused. This syndrome has recently been classed as a public health problem, and new theoretical approaches have arisen arguing for the study of variables, which insofar as they are related to burnout, can take on a protective role against the events triggering the syndrome. 

Self-efficacy, understood as the perception of competence to solve different stressful situations, has also been considered as a moderating variable of stress, and is protective against exhaustion at work. On the other hand, burnout and job satisfaction are considered to represent different emotional responses to work, although they are closely related. Based on these findings, and being convinced that self-efficacy can reduce the negative consequences of chronic stress, there is a need to expand the research focused on the role that these factors play in the development of burnout syndrome and its maintenance, or also, why not, in its prevention and/or treatment.

This Special Issue is intended to provide greater visibility to the empirical study of the relationships between the variables, directly or indirectly, involved in the development or timing of worker burnout.

Priority will be given to papers presenting the results of data collection and statistical analysis, and theoretical reviews framed within a systematic methodology or meta-analysis, which are outstanding because of the relevance of their results, will also be considered. Above all, those that present an up-to-date methodological framework, which can be considered a starting point for future lines of research, will be considered, specifically the following: proposal of theoretical models, development of evaluation instruments, or design of intervention programs.

Dr. María del Mar Molero Jurado
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • burnout
  • self-efficacy
  • job satisfaction
  • occupational health
  • workplace
  • risk factors
  • protection factors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Job Insecurity, Family Functionality and Mental Health: A Comparative Study between Male and Female Hospitality Workers
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10100146 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
The aim of the present article is to compare the family functionality, mental health and job insecurity of employees of the hospitality industry in Puerto Vallarta and Bahía de Banderas, in México. This is a quantitative and cross-sectional study. The sample was selected [...] Read more.
The aim of the present article is to compare the family functionality, mental health and job insecurity of employees of the hospitality industry in Puerto Vallarta and Bahía de Banderas, in México. This is a quantitative and cross-sectional study. The sample was selected by non-probabilistic sampling for convenience and comprised a total of 914 people, of whom 438 were women (47.92%) and 476 were men (52.08%). The women surveyed reported more somatic symptoms, anxiety, insomnia and social dysfunction compared to men, which allows the conclusion that their mental health is vulnerable; meanwhile, men showed better perception of family functionality, a positive factor that reveals the family as a potential support factor that reduces stress, anxiety and improves men’s mental health. Another result reveals that the gender structure permeates the hotel sector, inequalities in the type of contract and income are corroborated, and the existence of a sexual division of labor to the detriment of women is confirmed, as they are mostly employed in low-skilled jobs that reproduce domestic tasks, particularly those related to cleaning and food service tasks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction)
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Open AccessArticle
Promoting Individual and Organizational OCBs: The Mediating Role of Work Engagement
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10090138 - 14 Sep 2020
Abstract
In today’s dynamic organizational environment, employees with a tendency to display discretional behaviors beyond their prescribed formal job duties represent a plus. Underpinned by the theories of social exchange and conservation of resources, these behaviors can be influenced by their level of job [...] Read more.
In today’s dynamic organizational environment, employees with a tendency to display discretional behaviors beyond their prescribed formal job duties represent a plus. Underpinned by the theories of social exchange and conservation of resources, these behaviors can be influenced by their level of job satisfaction (JS), defined as the extent to which employees like their work, and work engagement (WE), defined as a positive work-related state of mind. The present study investigates the mediating mechanism of WE in the relationship between JS and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), which refer to discretionary behaviors that could benefit an organization (OCBs-O) and/or its members (OCBs-I). The mediational hypothesis is examined using structural equation modeling (SEM) among 719 Italian private and public sector employees. The significance of total, direct, and indirect effects was tested via bootstrapping. The results showed that JS was positively related to WE, which, in turn, was positively related to both OCBs-I and OCBs-O. The SEM results supported the hypotheses: WE fully mediated the relationship between JS and OCBs-I, and it partially mediated the relationship between JS and OCBs-O. This study sheds new light on this mechanism. Consequently, it is useful for HRM policy. It also helps us to better understand how satisfied and engaged employees are willing to adopt positive organizational behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction)
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Open AccessArticle
Time is on My Side—or Is It? Assessing How Perceived Control of Time and Procrastination Influence Emotional Exhaustion on the Job
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10060098 - 10 Jun 2020
Abstract
The job demands–control model (JDC) postulates that an increased control over work resources mitigates or “buffers” the positive association between job stressors and strainers. However, the inconclusive validation of the buffering hypothesis across multiple studies suggests the need for fresh approaches, both conceptual [...] Read more.
The job demands–control model (JDC) postulates that an increased control over work resources mitigates or “buffers” the positive association between job stressors and strainers. However, the inconclusive validation of the buffering hypothesis across multiple studies suggests the need for fresh approaches, both conceptual and methodological. We integrated aspects of the JDC framework and time management process models to construct a model that tested both the direct and indirect effects of the perceived control of time (PCT) on emotional exhaustion arising from workload demands. Furthermore, we tested whether procrastination tendencies moderated the benefits of PCT on work stressors and strains. Data were collected in an Internet survey with 356 US adult office workers obtained from Prolific. The results supported the buffering effect of PCT on emotional exhaustion. PCT both mediated and exerted direct effects on the relationship between workload and emotional exhaustion. Procrastination tendencies moderated PCT and, in turn, undermined high PCT ability to reduce emotional exhaustion. Overall, the findings suggested that giving workers more control over their time may reduce stress associated with demanding workloads. However, chronic procrastinators may benefit less from having more control over time resources if they are not provided with tools to help them self-regulate more effectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction)
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