Special Issue "Psychosocial Impacts of New Technologies and the Internet"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Linda K. Kaye
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Edge Hill University, Lancashire, UK
Interests: digital gaming; social identity; online behaviour; psychosocial impacts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to submit manuscripts to the Special Issue of “Psychosocial Impacts of New Technologies and the Internet”. New technologies and the Internet are increasingly integrated in many aspects of our everyday lives, and it is therefore paramount to understand how these relate to human functioning in the 21st Century. Of specific interest is how specific technologies and aspects of the Internet relate to psychosocial well-being, but importantly, what affordances underpin these experiences to explain these observed relationships. To date, greater attention is needed with regard to measuring our technology and online use, to provide a more objective basis for understanding “engagement”. The current reliance on self-report is noted to be problematic in this area and thus requires greater scientific scrutiny. It is also noted that there is often a tendency to conflate issues when discussing smartphones and social media, and thus, work in this area should warrant greater nuance in this regard.

Topics which are welcomed in this Special Issue include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel ways of measuring technology and online use;
  • Specific Internet activities and their impact on psychosocial outcomes;
  • Specific technologies and their impact on psychosocial outcomes;
  • Social behaviour in VR and AR;
  • Longitudinal impacts of technology or Internet use;
  • Developmental differences when understanding psychosocial impacts of technology and the Internet.

The aim of this Special Issue is to consolidate and disseminate current thinking in this area, and to inform new directions for academic research and policy-making.

Dr. Linda K. Kaye
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychosocial impacts
  • technology
  • Internet
  • cyberpsychology
  • behaviour
  • online use

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Selfie-Viewing and Facial Dissatisfaction among Emerging Adults: A Moderated Mediation Model of Appearance Comparisons and Self-Objectification
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020672 - 20 Jan 2020
Abstract
With the visual turn in online communication, selfies have become common on social media. Although selfies as a way of self-representation provide people with more chances to express themselves, the adverse effects selfies could bring to users’ body image need to be treated [...] Read more.
With the visual turn in online communication, selfies have become common on social media. Although selfies as a way of self-representation provide people with more chances to express themselves, the adverse effects selfies could bring to users’ body image need to be treated seriously. This study tested whether selfie-viewing behaviour on social media was related to facial dissatisfaction and whether appearance comparisons played a mediating role. Moreover, the self-objectification was examined as a moderator between selfie-viewing behaviour and facial dissatisfaction via appearance comparisons. Results showed that more selfie-viewing was associated with higher facial dissatisfaction, and this relationship was mediated by appearance comparisons. The study also found that self-objectification moderated the indirect relation between selfie-viewing and facial dissatisfaction via appearance comparisons. Gender differences were also found to affect the mediation model. Our research provides new insights into the interactions between social media use and perception of body image. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of New Technologies and the Internet)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nomophobia: An Individual’s Growing Fear of Being without a Smartphone—A Systematic Literature Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020580 - 16 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This review examines the current literature focused on nomophobia (objectives, methodological design, main variables, sample details, and measurement methods) in the Scopus and Web of Science databases. To this end, we conducted a systematic literature review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items [...] Read more.
This review examines the current literature focused on nomophobia (objectives, methodological design, main variables, sample details, and measurement methods) in the Scopus and Web of Science databases. To this end, we conducted a systematic literature review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) guidelines. The initial sample consisted of 142 articles, of which 42 met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in detail. The findings show that the current research is in an exploratory phase, with a greater predominance of descriptive, nonexperimental, and cross-sectional studies that explore the prevalence of nomophobia mainly in adolescents and university students. The most widely used measurement instrument is the Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q) proposed by Yildrim and Correia. In addition, the research suggests that nomophobia negatively affects personality, self-esteem, anxiety, stress, academic performance, and other physical and mental health problems. We are therefore faced with a health problem, which negatively affects a person, causing psychological problems and physical and behavioral changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of New Technologies and the Internet)
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