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2nd Edition of Primary Healthcare

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 9002

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Head of Research, CAPSBE, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2. Professor, Medicine Department, University of Barcelona (Spain), 08036 Barcelona, Spain
3. President of Catalan Society of Family & Community Medicine (CAMFiC), 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: clinic research; primary health care; health care policy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Primary Health Care Center Les Corts, Consorci d'Atenció Primària de Salut Barcelona Esquerra (CAPSBE), C. Mejia Lequerica S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: nursing; health literacy; nursing interventions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing the second edition of the Special Issue “Primary Healthcare” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, a peer-reviewed scientific journal, which publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The Special Issue welcomes original research articles presenting quantitative and/or qualitative data that highlight core values of primary healthcare: health-promoting, disease-preventing, community-oriented, patient-centered, and continuous healthcare.

Prof. Dr. Antoni Sisó-Almirall
Dr. Luis González-de Paz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • primary healthcare
  • comorbidity
  • eHealth
  • chronic diseases
  • home care
  • risk factors
  • family health
  • geriatrics
  • health promotion
  • disease prevention
  • long-term care

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2968 KiB  
Article
Research on the Equity and Optimal Allocation of Basic Medical Services in Guangzhou in the Context of COVID-19
by Jin Li, Jie Li and Jian Huang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14656; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214656 - 08 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1587
Abstract
Optimizing the allocation of basic medical services and ensuring their equity are necessary to improve the ability to respond to public health emergencies and promote health equity in the context of COVID-19. This study aims to analyze the equity of Guangzhou’s basic medical [...] Read more.
Optimizing the allocation of basic medical services and ensuring their equity are necessary to improve the ability to respond to public health emergencies and promote health equity in the context of COVID-19. This study aims to analyze the equity of Guangzhou’s basic medical service and identify areas where health resources are relatively scarce. The spatial distribution and patterns of basic medical services were analyzed using kernel density analysis and standard deviation ellipse. The equity was analyzed using the Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve in terms of population and geographical area, respectively. Considering the medical demand and supply sides, the Gaussian two-step floating catchment area method was used to analyze the accessibility to different levels of medical institutions. The kernel density analysis and standard deviation ellipse showed that the spatial distribution of medical and health resources in Guangzhou is unevenly distributed, and high-level hospitals and medical resources are mainly concentrated in the centrum. From the perspective of population, Guangzhou’s medical equity is generally reasonable. The accessibility of medical institutions differs with different levels, and the tertiary medical institutions have the best accessibility, while the unclassified, primary, and secondary medical institutions generally have lower accessibility. The accessibility of districts in Guangzhou varies greatly. Areas in the center are most accessible to basic medical services, while accessibility in outskirt areas has gradually decreased. Conclusion: The quantity of per capita medical and health resources in Guangzhou, as evidenced by basic medical services, is sufficient, but the spatial distribution is unequal. The developed city center enjoys more adequate healthcare resources than the distant suburbs. Primary healthcare should be built, especially in distant suburbs, to strengthen basic medical service equity in Guangzhou. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Primary Healthcare)
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11 pages, 1157 KiB  
Article
Face-to-Face and Tele-Consults: A Study of the Effects on Diagnostic Activity and Patient Demand in Primary Healthcare
by Lourdes E. Barón-Miras, Antoni Sisó-Almirall, Belchin Kostov, Encarna Sánchez, Silvia Roura, Jaume Benavent-Àreu and Luis González-de Paz
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114119 - 29 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2499
Abstract
Primary healthcare services have changed from face-to-face to tele-consults during the two COVID-19 years. We examined trends before and during the COVID-19 pandemic years based on groups of professionals, patient ages, and the associations with the diagnostic registry. We analyzed proportions for both [...] Read more.
Primary healthcare services have changed from face-to-face to tele-consults during the two COVID-19 years. We examined trends before and during the COVID-19 pandemic years based on groups of professionals, patient ages, and the associations with the diagnostic registry. We analyzed proportions for both periods, and ratios of the type of consults in 2017–2019 and 2020–2021 were calculated. The COVID-19 period was examined using monthly linear time trends. The results showed that consults in 2020–2021 increased by 24%. General practitioners saw significant falls in face-to-face consults compared with 2017–2019 (ratio 0.44; 95% CI: 0.44 to 0.45), but the increase was not proportional across age groups; patients aged 15–44 years had 45.8% more tele-consults, and those aged >74 years had 18.2% more. Trends in linear regression models of face-to-face consults with general practitioners and monthly diagnostic activity were positive, while the tele-consult trend was inverse to the trend of the diagnostic registry and face-to-face consults. Tele-consults did not resolve the increased demand for primary healthcare services caused by COVID-19. General practitioners, nurses and primary healthcare professionals require better-adapted tele-consult tools for an effective diagnostic registry to maintain equity of access and answer older patients’ needs and priorities in primary healthcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Primary Healthcare)
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13 pages, 500 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Health Counselor Characteristics and Counseling Impact on Individuals at High-Risk for Lifestyle-Related Disease: Sub-Analysis of the J-HARP Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial
by Midori Noguchi, Minako Kinuta, Toshimi Sairenchi, Miyae Yamakawa, Keiko Koide, Shoko Katsura, Kazue Matsuo, Shizuko Omote, Hironori Imano, Hitoshi Nishizawa, Iichiro Shimomura, Hiroyasu Iso and On behalf of the J-HARP Research Group
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6375; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116375 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1840
Abstract
Early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent lifestyle-related diseases among high-risk individuals. This study aimed to examine the impact of counselor characteristics on clinic visits among individuals at high risk for lifestyle-related diseases. A total of 8975 patients aged 40 to 74 [...] Read more.
Early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent lifestyle-related diseases among high-risk individuals. This study aimed to examine the impact of counselor characteristics on clinic visits among individuals at high risk for lifestyle-related diseases. A total of 8975 patients aged 40 to 74 years with lifestyle-related comorbidities, who underwent an annual health checkup and received health counseling, were included in this study. Data intervention timing, mode of counseling, number of counseling sessions, and explanation methods were collected. We assessed the impact of counselor characteristics, including profession (public health nurse, clinical nurse, and nutritionist), age, and years of counseling experience, on counseling outcomes. The probability ratios (95% confidence intervals) of clinic visits were 1.22 (1.11–1.35) for public health nurses and 1.04 (0.90–1.20) for nurses compared with nutritionists. After adjustment for participant and counselor characteristics and initial timing, mode, and number of counseling sessions, the corresponding probability ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.16 (1.05–1.29) and 1.12 (0.95–1.31), respectively. Counselor age and years of experience did not influence clinic visits of the target population. Public health nurses were more effective in increasing clinic visits among the target population owing to their profession-specific knowledge, skills, and experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Primary Healthcare)
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Review

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22 pages, 3228 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Case Management in Advanced Heart Failure Patients Attended in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Caterina Checa, Carlos Canelo-Aybar, Stefanie Suclupe, David Ginesta-López, Anna Berenguera, Xavier Castells, Carlos Brotons and Margarita Posso
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 13823; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192113823 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2198
Abstract
Aims: Nurse-led case management (CM) may improve quality of life (QoL) for advanced heart failure (HF) patients. No systematic review (SR), however, has summarized its effectiveness/cost-effectiveness. We aimed to evaluate the effect of such programs in primary care settings in advanced HF patients. [...] Read more.
Aims: Nurse-led case management (CM) may improve quality of life (QoL) for advanced heart failure (HF) patients. No systematic review (SR), however, has summarized its effectiveness/cost-effectiveness. We aimed to evaluate the effect of such programs in primary care settings in advanced HF patients. We examined and summarized evidence on QoL, mortality, hospitalization, self-care, and cost-effectiveness. Methods and results: The MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Clinical Trials, WHO, Registry of International Clinical Trials, and Central Cochrane were searched up to March 2022. The Consensus Health Economic Criteria instrument to assess risk-of-bias in economic evaluations, Cochrane risk-of-bias 2 for clinical trials, and an adaptation of Robins-I for quasi-experimental and cohort studies were employed. Results from nurse-led CM programs did not reduce mortality (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.15; participants = 1345; studies = 6; I2 = 47%). They decreased HF hospitalizations (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.91; participants = 1989; studies = 8; I2 = 0%) and all-cause ones (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.89; participants = 1012; studies = 5; I2 = 36%). QoL improved in medium-term follow-up (SMD 0.18, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.32; participants = 1228; studies = 8; I2 = 28%), and self-care was not statistically significant improved (SMD 0.66, 95% CI −0.84 to 2.17; participants = 450; studies = 3; I2 = 97%). A wide variety of costs ranging from USD 4975 to EUR 27,538 was observed. The intervention was cost-effective at ≤EUR 60,000/QALY. Conclusions: Nurse-led CM reduces all-cause hospital admissions and HF hospitalizations but not all-cause mortality. QoL improved at medium-term follow-up. Such programs could be cost-effective in high-income countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Primary Healthcare)
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