Special Issue "Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Susana Llorens Gumbau
Website
Guest Editor
WANT Research Team, Department of evolutive, educative, social and methodology, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana 12001-06, Spain
Interests: positive organizational psychology; healthy and resilient organizations; burnout; engagement; technostress; work addiction; trust; compassion; psychosocial interventions
Dr. Marisa Salanova
Website
Guest Editor
WANT Research Team, Department of evolutive, educative, social and methodology, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana 12001-06, Spain
Interests: positive organizational psychology; healthy and resilient organizations; leadership; compassion; psychosocial interventions
Dr. Hedy Acosta
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Talca, Avda. Lircay s/n, Talca, Maule, Chile
Interests: work and organizational psychology; positive organizational psychology; risk factors at work; organizations interventions; mythology; burnout; work engagement; organizational trust; leadership
Dr. Israel Sánchez-Cardona
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Psychological Science, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia, GA 30144, USA
Interests: positive organizational psychology; occupational health psychology; work and academic engagement; job boredom; psychological capital; mental health and wellbeing; team learning and resilience; quantitative research methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, positive psychology has been extended to the organizational context. Organizations are more conscious about the relevance of adopting more positive strategies in order to promote organizational excellence, financial success, and employee wellbeing. In this context, positive organizational psychology (POP) is gaining more ground. POP is defined as the scientific study of optimal functioning of the health of people and groups in organizations, the effective management of psychosocial wellbeing at work, and the development of healthy organizations (Salanova, Martínez and Llorens, 2005; Salanova, Llorens, and Martínez, 2016). POP’s objective is to describe, explain, and predict optimal functioning in these contexts, as well as amplify and enhance psychosocial wellbeing as well as the quality of work and organizational life. Positive organizations are made up of physically and psychologically healthy people who develop in positive work environments and organizational culture (Salanova and Llorens, 2016). The core of the POP is to discover the characteristics that promote a complete organizational life; to this end, there is a need to answer two pivotal questions: what characterizes positive employees and what positive organizations look like. Furthermore, from an organizational perspective, these characteristics have to be addressed at different levels, not only at the individual level, but also at the inter-individual, group, organizational, and social levels. Some key constructs defined in POP include wellbeing, happiness, positive emotions, work engagement, flow, efficacy beliefs, commitment, or positive organizations. Despite the increasing interest in POP, some questions are still open.

This Special Issue focuses on the challenges of POP, including:

  • Meta-analysis, systematic and integrative reviews of POP;
  • Empirical results on psychological antecedents and consequences of POP;
  • Psychological working mechanisms in POP development over time;
  • Design and/or evaluation of the impact of positive psychological interventions.

Dr. Susana Llorens Gumbau
Dr. Marisa Salanova
Dr. Hedy Acosta
Dr. Israel Sánchez-Cardona
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Positive psychology
  • Positive organizational psychology
  • Healthy organizations
  • Resilient organizations
  • Positive psychological intervention

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7035; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
The current literature’s focus on unidirectional effects of psychological and organizational climates at work on work outcomes fails to capture the full relationship between these factors. This article examines whether a psychological climate for caring contributes to specific work outcomes and investigates whether [...] Read more.
The current literature’s focus on unidirectional effects of psychological and organizational climates at work on work outcomes fails to capture the full relationship between these factors. This article examines whether a psychological climate for caring contributes to specific work outcomes and investigates whether work outcomes support the climate for caring, creating a feedback loop. Results confirm a bi-directional, temporal association between perceived climate for caring and two of the four explored work outcomes: self-reported productivity and self-reported work quality. The effect of a perceived caring climate on these work outcomes was stronger than the effect in the opposite direction. The perception that the work climate was caring was also found to affect work engagement, but the reverse relationship was not identified. We did not find any evidence for a link between job satisfaction and a climate for caring at work in either direction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
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