Special Issue "Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Susana Llorens Gumbau
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
WANT Research Team, Department of evolutive, educative, social and methodology, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana 12001-06, Spain
Interests: positive organizational psychology; healthy and resilient organizations; burnout; engagement; technostress; work addiction; trust; compassion; psychosocial interventions
Dr. Marisa Salanova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
WANT Research Team, Department of evolutive, educative, social and methodology, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana 12001-06, Spain
Interests: positive organizational psychology; healthy and resilient organizations; leadership; compassion; psychosocial interventions
Dr. Hedy Acosta
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Talca, Avda. Lircay s/n, Talca, Maule, Chile
Interests: work and organizational psychology; positive organizational psychology; risk factors at work; organizations interventions; mythology; burnout; work engagement; organizational trust; leadership
Dr. Israel Sánchez-Cardona
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Psychological Science, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia, GA 30144, USA
Interests: positive organizational psychology; occupational health psychology; work and academic engagement; job boredom; psychological capital; mental health and wellbeing; team learning and resilience; quantitative research methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, positive psychology has been extended to the organizational context. Organizations are more conscious about the relevance of adopting more positive strategies in order to promote organizational excellence, financial success, and employee wellbeing. In this context, positive organizational psychology (POP) is gaining more ground. POP is defined as the scientific study of optimal functioning of the health of people and groups in organizations, the effective management of psychosocial wellbeing at work, and the development of healthy organizations (Salanova, Martínez and Llorens, 2005; Salanova, Llorens, and Martínez, 2016). POP’s objective is to describe, explain, and predict optimal functioning in these contexts, as well as amplify and enhance psychosocial wellbeing as well as the quality of work and organizational life. Positive organizations are made up of physically and psychologically healthy people who develop in positive work environments and organizational culture (Salanova and Llorens, 2016). The core of the POP is to discover the characteristics that promote a complete organizational life; to this end, there is a need to answer two pivotal questions: what characterizes positive employees and what positive organizations look like. Furthermore, from an organizational perspective, these characteristics have to be addressed at different levels, not only at the individual level, but also at the inter-individual, group, organizational, and social levels. Some key constructs defined in POP include wellbeing, happiness, positive emotions, work engagement, flow, efficacy beliefs, commitment, or positive organizations. Despite the increasing interest in POP, some questions are still open.

This Special Issue focuses on the challenges of POP, including:

  • Meta-analysis, systematic and integrative reviews of POP;
  • Empirical results on psychological antecedents and consequences of POP;
  • Psychological working mechanisms in POP development over time;
  • Design and/or evaluation of the impact of positive psychological interventions.

Dr. Susana Llorens Gumbau
Dr. Marisa Salanova
Dr. Hedy Acosta
Dr. Israel Sánchez-Cardona
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Positive psychology
  • Positive organizational psychology
  • Healthy organizations
  • Resilient organizations
  • Positive psychological intervention

Published Papers (13 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Effectiveness of a Humor-Based Training for Reducing Employees’ Distress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11177; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111177 - 24 Oct 2021
Viewed by 738
Abstract
An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that humor can impact interpersonal relationships in organizations and employee well-being. However, there is little evidence coming from intervention studies in organizational settings. In response, we developed a training following the principles of positive psychology that [...] Read more.
An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that humor can impact interpersonal relationships in organizations and employee well-being. However, there is little evidence coming from intervention studies in organizational settings. In response, we developed a training following the principles of positive psychology that aims at improving employees’ adaptive use of humor as a successful mechanism to deal with stress. In this study, we assess the effectiveness of such training and its impact on employee well-being. Results from this one-group intervention study in an emergency ambulance service (N = 58) revealed that the participants reported higher levels of cheerfulness (Z = −3.93; p < 0.001) and lower levels of seriousness (Z = −3.32; p < 0.001) after being exposed to the training. Indeed, the participants reported lower scores on psychological distress after the training (Z = −3.35; p < 0.001). The effect size of the training was medium (r = 0.31 to 0.36), suggesting that interventions to improve adaptive humor at work can be a useful resource to deal with workplace stress and foster employee well-being. These results may have interesting implications for designing and implementing positive interventions as well as for developing healthy organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Leading the Challenge: Leader Support Modifies the Effect of Role Ambiguity on Engagement and Extra-Role Behaviors in Public Employees
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8408; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168408 - 09 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1070
Abstract
The assumption of new challenges and services to provide, and the evolution of new technologies in public administration, give employees an important perception of ambiguity when carrying out their work. Role ambiguity has been conceptualized as one of the main impeding demands at [...] Read more.
The assumption of new challenges and services to provide, and the evolution of new technologies in public administration, give employees an important perception of ambiguity when carrying out their work. Role ambiguity has been conceptualized as one of the main impeding demands at work with negative consequences. The objective of the present study is to analyze the moderating effect of the support by the department head in the negative influence of the role ambiguity on the engagement and the extra-role performance behaviors of the employees. The hypothesis is proposed that the support of the department head will mean the transformation of role ambiguity into a challenging job demand with positive results. A total of 315 public employees with administrative staff have participated in this study. Results confirmed that the support of the leader moderates the effects of role ambiguity. The inclusion of this variable as a moderator transforms the influence of role ambiguity on the employees’ engagement into a positive one and reduces their negative effect on extra-role performance behaviors. These results reinforce the role of leader support as a protective element against job demands in public administrations. Theoretical and practical implications and future lines of research are discussed at the end of the work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Subjective Well-Being and Its Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Correlates in High Performance Executives: A Study in Chilean Managers Empirically Revisiting the Bifactor Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158082 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 716
Abstract
This study analyzes the relationship between work satisfaction, family satisfaction, and general well-being in high performance managers in Santiago, Chile. The importance of the satisfaction of intrinsic and extrinsic needs and motivations was examined to advance in the development of a positive organizational [...] Read more.
This study analyzes the relationship between work satisfaction, family satisfaction, and general well-being in high performance managers in Santiago, Chile. The importance of the satisfaction of intrinsic and extrinsic needs and motivations was examined to advance in the development of a positive organizational psychology, which investigates the factors that reinforce well-being. Seventy-five executives from large and medium-sized companies were surveyed and 8 in-depth interviews were carried out. The main predictors of well-being are, from family satisfaction, the family’s ability to cope with stress and, from work satisfaction, extrinsic aspects such as material conditions of the job and stability, and intrinsic aspects such as recognition and the ability to organize one’s own work. The more general regression model shows that extrinsic job and family satisfaction predict general well-being, not intrinsic satisfaction. The results are discussed in the framework of classical models of motivation, such as Herzberg’s, their relationship to Deci and Ryan’s self-determination theory, and the current study of well-being in organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Article
The Longitudinal Link between Organizational Citizenship Behaviors and Three Different Models of Happiness
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6387; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126387 - 12 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1276
Abstract
A growing body of research conducted in general life settings has found positive associations between happiness and prosocial behavior. Unfortunately, equivalent studies in the workplace are lacking. Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), the prosocial behaviors at work, have not been properly studied in relation [...] Read more.
A growing body of research conducted in general life settings has found positive associations between happiness and prosocial behavior. Unfortunately, equivalent studies in the workplace are lacking. Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), the prosocial behaviors at work, have not been properly studied in relation to happiness, despite the positive consequences of both constructs for workers and companies. In response, our research aims to better understand this relationship from several angles. First, using a three-wave longitudinal design, we explored how OCBs and happiness are related to each other over time. Second, happiness was measured from a broad perspective, and three conceptualizations were adopted: the hedonic (e.g., positive affect and life satisfaction), the eudaimonic (e.g., relatedness and autonomy), and the flourishing (e.g., meaning and engagement) approaches. Thus, not only the prospective link between OCBs and happiness was tested, but it was also explored using the three models of happiness previously mentioned. Third, we conducted this longitudinal design in a less typical sample than previous research (i.e., Chile). We found results that supported our main hypotheses: (1) OCBs are prospective positive predictors of hedonic happiness, eudaimonic happiness, and flourishing; (2) the three models of happiness also prospectively predict OCBs. Our findings suggest that OCBs foster a broad range of happiness facets, which in turn fosters back the emergence of more OCBs, leading to a virtuous circle of prosociality and well-being in the workplace. This positive spiral benefits not only workers’ quality of life, but also organizations’ profitability and sustainability. Theoretical and applied implications for the field of Positive Organizational Psychology are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Job Crafting and Work Engagement: The Mediating Role of Work Meaning
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5383; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105383 - 18 May 2021
Viewed by 1100
Abstract
One of the most widely researched personal resources is job crafting, for which several studies have confirmed the existence of a positive relationship with engagement. Some authors suggest that it would be necessary to go deeper into the mechanisms that can help us [...] Read more.
One of the most widely researched personal resources is job crafting, for which several studies have confirmed the existence of a positive relationship with engagement. Some authors suggest that it would be necessary to go deeper into the mechanisms that can help us explain this relationship. Therefore, the aim of this study is to ascertain the possible influence of the meaning of work on the relationship between job crafting and engagement. The sample is composed of 814 workers (50.4% women) with an average age of 41.68 years (SD = 9.78). The results were obtained by simple mediation analysis using PROCESS. The meaning of work mediates the relationship between job crafting and engagement, this influence being especially significant in the case of cognitive crafting. This study confirms the positive relationship between job crafting and engagement. However, in the case of some types of job crafting, increased levels of engagement only occur if the individuals also manage to increase the levels of meaning attributed to the work role. Therefore, in order to improve the well-being levels of working people, it would also be necessary to help them understand how these changes help them to attribute more meaning to their work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
We Trust You! A Multilevel-Multireferent Model Based on Organizational Trust to Explain Performance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084241 - 16 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
This study tests organizational trust as the psychosocial mechanism that explains how healthy organizational practices and team resources predict multilevel performance in organizations and teams, respectively. In our methodology, we collect data in a sample of 890 employees from 177 teams and their [...] Read more.
This study tests organizational trust as the psychosocial mechanism that explains how healthy organizational practices and team resources predict multilevel performance in organizations and teams, respectively. In our methodology, we collect data in a sample of 890 employees from 177 teams and their immediate supervisors from 31 Spanish companies. Our results from the multilevel analysis show two independent processes predicting organizational performance (return on assets, ROA) and performance ratings by immediate supervisors, operating at the organizational and team levels, respectively. We have found evidence for a theoretical and functional quasi-isomorphism. First, based on social exchange theory, we found evidence for our prediction that when organizations implement healthy practices and teams provide resources, employees trust their top managers (vertical trust) and coworkers (horizontal trust) and try to reciprocate these benefits by improving their performance. Second, (relationships among) constructs are similar at different levels of analysis, which may inform HRM officers and managers about which type of practices and resources can help to enhance trust and improve performance in organizations. The present study contributes to the scarce research on the role of trust at collective (i.e., organizational and team) levels as a psychological mechanism that explains how organizational practices and team resources are linked to organizational performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Gratitude at Work Prospectively Predicts Lower Workplace Materialism: A Three-Wave Longitudinal Study in Chile
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3787; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073787 - 05 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1073
Abstract
Materialism at work refers to a higher importance attached to extrinsic (e.g., money, fame, image) versus intrinsic (self-development, affiliation, community participation) employees’ ‘aspirations’. Research from self-determination theory has consistently found that materialism at work is strongly detrimental for both employees and organizations. For [...] Read more.
Materialism at work refers to a higher importance attached to extrinsic (e.g., money, fame, image) versus intrinsic (self-development, affiliation, community participation) employees’ ‘aspirations’. Research from self-determination theory has consistently found that materialism at work is strongly detrimental for both employees and organizations. For example, materialism is negatively associated with lower job satisfaction and engagement and positively associated with higher turnover intentions and job insecurity. Unfortunately, there are no viable strategies for reducing materialism in the workplace yet. In this sense, based on emergent research in psychology, we theorized that dispositional gratitude—a key construct within the Positive Organizational Psychology field—could be a protecting factor against materialism. Further, we conducted a three-wave longitudinal design among a large sample of Chilean workers (n = 1841) to test, for the first time, the longitudinal link between gratitude and materialism. We used two novel methodologies: A cross-lagged panel model (CLPM) to test between-person changes and a trait-state-occasion model (TSO) to test within-person changes. We found that both the CLPM as well as the TSO models showed that gratitude at work prospectively predicted further lower workplace materialism. Specifically, the CLPM shows that individuals with higher than average gratitude at Ti, are more likely to show lower than average materialism at Ti+1. The TSO shows that individuals with a higher than their usual level of gratitude at Ti are more likely to show a lower than their usual level of materialism at Ti+1. Important implications for materialism research as well as for the Positive Organizational Psychology field are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Role of Adequate Resources, Community and Supportive Leadership in Creating Engaged Academics
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2776; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052776 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1257
Abstract
The vast majority of research in academia focuses on the adverse working conditions and poor wellbeing. The present paper presents a positive view on the factors that may promote work engagement in academia. Based on conservation of resources theory, we suggest that academic [...] Read more.
The vast majority of research in academia focuses on the adverse working conditions and poor wellbeing. The present paper presents a positive view on the factors that may promote work engagement in academia. Based on conservation of resources theory, we suggest that academic resources may be related to a social community at work, which in turn creates work engagement among academics. Having positive leadership in the form of fair leadership may be an important contextual factor ensuring that resources are shared fairly and openly. In a study of 1499 academics in Norwegian universities, we found that sufficient administrative resources to support teaching duties were positively related with work engagement, and that a sense of community mediated the relationship between academic resources for teaching and work engagement. These results propose that building academics’ social resources by providing them with the necessary resources to perform their jobs will buffer the impact of a leadership that is perceived to be unfair and help them to perform their work in a positive way. Our results carry important implications for how positive psychology may be used to support engaged workers in academia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Influence on Forgiveness, Character Strengths and Satisfaction with Life of a Short Mindfulness Intervention via a Spanish Smartphone Application
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 802; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020802 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1633
Abstract
Mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) are a recognized effective psychological practice characterized by attention control, awareness, acceptance, non-reactivity, and non-judgmental thinking obtained through the practice of meditation. They have been shown to be useful in reducing stress and enhancing well-being in different contexts. In this [...] Read more.
Mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) are a recognized effective psychological practice characterized by attention control, awareness, acceptance, non-reactivity, and non-judgmental thinking obtained through the practice of meditation. They have been shown to be useful in reducing stress and enhancing well-being in different contexts. In this research, the effectiveness of an MBI was evaluated on variables that can promote successful job performance such as mindfulness trait, positive and negative affect, forgiveness, personality strengths and satisfaction with life. The intervention was carried out through a smartphone application called “Aire Fresco” (Fresh Air) during 14 days in the middle of the quarantine produced by the Covid-19 pandemic. The study sample was composed of 164 Spanish people who were distributed in two groups: control group and experimental group, which were evaluated before and after the intervention. The MANCOVA performed showed an overall positive effect of the intervention on the variables evaluated. The different ANCOVAs carried out showed that the intervention was beneficial in increasing mindfulness trait, reducing negative affect or increasing life satisfaction, among others. Our study is, as far as we know, the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of a brief intervention in mindfulness conducted using a smartphone application in Spanish. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Article
Positive Psychology in Context of Peacekeeping Militaries: A Mediation Model of Work-Family Enrichment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 429; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020429 - 07 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1077
Abstract
Based on the work-family enrichment theory, this study analyzes the contribution of work-family and family-work enrichment to explain the military’s well-being during a peacekeeping mission. The data used were collected in a sample of 306 Brazilian soldiers, who were married and/or had children, [...] Read more.
Based on the work-family enrichment theory, this study analyzes the contribution of work-family and family-work enrichment to explain the military’s well-being during a peacekeeping mission. The data used were collected in a sample of 306 Brazilian soldiers, who were married and/or had children, during the phase named “employment of troops” (i.e., when peacekeepers had been in the Haitian territory and, as a result, away from their families, for between three to five months). Data analysis was performed using the Structural Equations Model. It was observed that the military’s perception of their spouses’ support for their participation during the mission had a positive relationship with both family-to-work enrichment and work-to-family enrichment, and the work-to-family enrichment mediated the relationship between the perception of the spouses’ support and the military’s health perception and general satisfaction with life. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed and limitations and suggestions for future research were presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Generalizability of HERO across 15 Nations: Positive Psychological Capital (PsyCap) beyond the US and Other WEIRD Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9432; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249432 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1154
Abstract
Recent meta-analyses of positive organizational psychology interventions (POPIs) suggest that interventions that target and improve hope, efficacy, resilience, and optimism (HERO) can be highly effective at improving well-being and positive functioning at work. However, many studies to date have been conducted with samples [...] Read more.
Recent meta-analyses of positive organizational psychology interventions (POPIs) suggest that interventions that target and improve hope, efficacy, resilience, and optimism (HERO) can be highly effective at improving well-being and positive functioning at work. However, many studies to date have been conducted with samples from the US and other Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) societies, which raise the concern about the generalizability of theory-driven POPIs. The aim of this study was to examine if the underlying mechanism of one of the most successful POPIs to date, positive psychological capital (PsyCap) based on the HERO model, predicts positive functioning at work across diverse geographical regions and cultures. Using Qualtrics Panel data collected from 3860 employees across 15 nations (Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, South Africa, and the United States), we found that PsyCap is strongly associated with workplace proactivity, proficiency, adaptivity, and overall work performance across all 15 nations. The results suggest that efforts to develop PsyCap may be effective across national cultures and could be a robust approach for enhancing positive functioning in the global workplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7035; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1279
Abstract
The current literature’s focus on unidirectional effects of psychological and organizational climates at work on work outcomes fails to capture the full relationship between these factors. This article examines whether a psychological climate for caring contributes to specific work outcomes and investigates whether [...] Read more.
The current literature’s focus on unidirectional effects of psychological and organizational climates at work on work outcomes fails to capture the full relationship between these factors. This article examines whether a psychological climate for caring contributes to specific work outcomes and investigates whether work outcomes support the climate for caring, creating a feedback loop. Results confirm a bi-directional, temporal association between perceived climate for caring and two of the four explored work outcomes: self-reported productivity and self-reported work quality. The effect of a perceived caring climate on these work outcomes was stronger than the effect in the opposite direction. The perception that the work climate was caring was also found to affect work engagement, but the reverse relationship was not identified. We did not find any evidence for a link between job satisfaction and a climate for caring at work in either direction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Positive Organizational Psychology: A Bibliometric Review and Science Mapping Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5222; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105222 - 14 May 2021
Viewed by 1405
Abstract
Positive organizational psychology (POP) is a research area that focuses on the positive aspects of optimal functioning at work. Although consolidated and with a large volume of publications, no bibliometric analysis has been performed that allows knowing its high-level structure, developments, and distribution [...] Read more.
Positive organizational psychology (POP) is a research area that focuses on the positive aspects of optimal functioning at work. Although consolidated and with a large volume of publications, no bibliometric analysis has been performed that allows knowing its high-level structure, developments, and distribution of knowledge since its origins. The objective is to analyze the 7181 articles published in POP on the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC). A retrospective bibliometric analysis and science mapping were performed. The title, authors, institutions, countries, scientific categories, journals, keywords, year, and citations were extracted from WoSCC. Impact factor, quartile, and country were collected from Journal Citation Reports (JCR) 2019. Authors were classified according to the proposal of Crane, and Bradford’s law was calculated. The results show that it is an area with more than 100 years of experience, divided into three stages of different productivity and visibility, highlighting a decrease in its visibility in recent years. With a multidisciplinary and international interest, psychology and business and economics stand out, especially in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. Four popular study topics emerged: well-being at work, positive leadership, work engagement, and psychological capital. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop