ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 13601

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jose Luis Felipe Hernández
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Sport Sciences, European University of Madrid, 28670 Madrid, Spain
Interests: physical activity; sport sciences; sport technology; sport surfaces
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scientific evidence has shown that physical activity and sport, practiced with certain frequency and at a moderate to vigorous intensity, are one of the best strategies currently available to promote public health and the well-being of the population. Therefore, the main aim of the current Special Issue is to explore diverse programs developed in the context of physical education and exercise prehabilitation in different populations. The Special Issue will share relevant conclusions of the promotion of physical activity in different contexts with physiological, psychological, cognitive, and affective consequences. Moreover, we intend to examine different intervention programs dedicated to the promotion of physical activity and exercise in different contexts and for different age groups.

This Special Issue will be situated in existing literature and emphasize new studies and the results of different instruments and designs. It is important to note the importance and novelty of the treatment of physical activity and its different consequences, such as cognitive achievement, body image, etc. Studies covering the physical education context and its environment should be of interest to researchers and readers interested in promoting physical activity and exercise prehabilitation and can also be covered in this Special Issue.

Dr.. José Luis Felipe Hernández
Dr. Javier Sánchez-Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical education
  • exercise prehabilitation
  • intervention program
  • fitness
  • physical activity
  • public health
  • well-being

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Effects of an Eight-Week Concurrent Training Program with Different Effort Character over Physical Fitness, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Lipid Profile among Hospital Workers: Preliminary Results
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9328; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179328 - 03 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 878
Abstract
Background: The “effort character” (EC) is a resistance training method without reaching muscle failure. It was defined by González-Badillo and Gorostiaga Ayestarán (2002) as the relationship between the repetitions performed and the repetitions achievable. Then, the EC is at its maximum (i.e., 100%) [...] Read more.
Background: The “effort character” (EC) is a resistance training method without reaching muscle failure. It was defined by González-Badillo and Gorostiaga Ayestarán (2002) as the relationship between the repetitions performed and the repetitions achievable. Then, the EC is at its maximum (i.e., 100%) when the subject realizes all the repetitions possible in a series with any load. Therefore, an EC of 50% indicates execution of 50% of the repetitions achievable in a series. This study aimed to determine the effects of two programs of eight weeks of concurrent training (CT) with different EC over muscle strength (MS), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), functional mobility (FM), health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and lipid profile (LP) among hospital workers. Methods: Fourteen hospital workers (age: 41.1 ± 10.8 years; body mass: 63.0 ± 10.8 kg; height: 165.2 ± 6.5 cm; body mass index (BMI): 23.0 ± 3.4 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to an EC 50% (n = 7) or EC 100% (n = 7) group. Results: The main finding was that both groups significantly improved in MS and FM levels but not HRQoL, with no statistical differences between EC 50% and EC 100% in adherence and any test despite performing half the volume of the strength workout. Conclusions: An eight-week CT program with different EC (i.e., EC 50% vs. EC 100%) seems to improve the MS and FM levels in hospital workers similarly. These findings could be very useful in health-training practices because of the possibility of planning training loads with half the volume of strength workouts without the loss of any training adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Article
Relative Age Effect in Physical Fitness of South Portugal Students between 10 and 18 Years Old
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6092; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116092 - 05 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1230
Abstract
Relative age is a phenomenon broadly studied in sport sciences. Youth sports participants born earlier in the selection year tend to present a maturational advantage over their peers. As it is also dependent on physical performance, older physical education students may also benefit [...] Read more.
Relative age is a phenomenon broadly studied in sport sciences. Youth sports participants born earlier in the selection year tend to present a maturational advantage over their peers. As it is also dependent on physical performance, older physical education students may also benefit from this effect in this school subject. The main goal of this manuscript was to determine whether the relative age effect is present within physical fitness outcomes of Portuguese children and adolescents. The physical–aerobic fitness, strength, flexibility and body composition of 885 students (490 females and 395 males) were collected and compared by quarters of birth, segmented by gender and age groups (10–12; 12–14; 14–16 and 16–18 years). The results reveal a moderate to small effect in physical fitness outcomes, with a trend for children and adolescents born in the early part of the year to present higher performance levels. These differences were more evident in ages closer to the physical maturational onset (12–14 y) and more apparent in male students. This physical fitness advantage may lead to a biased assessment and development of students born earlier in the year. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Performance Parameters in Competitive Alpine Skiing Disciplines of Slalom, Giant Slalom and Super-Giant Slalom
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2628; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052628 - 05 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1265
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the kinematic patterns and impacts in male and female skiers in the super-giant slalom, giant slalom and slalom disciplines of an international alpine skiing competition using a portable Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technology device. [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to describe the kinematic patterns and impacts in male and female skiers in the super-giant slalom, giant slalom and slalom disciplines of an international alpine skiing competition using a portable Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technology device. Fifteen skiers (males, n = 9, females, n = 6) volunteered to participate in this study. Data acquisition was carried out using a wireless inertial measurement device (WIMUTM PRO: hybrid location system GNSS at 18 Hz with a precision locator UltraWideband UWD (<10 cm) and 3D accelerometers 1000 Hz) where distances covered in different speed and acceleration thresholds and impacts above 5g were recorded in each of the disciplines. Male and female alpine skiers showed different physical parameters and impacts even though they competed in the same courses in the disciplines of slalom, giant slalom and super-giant slalom (total impacts: p < 0.001; impacts > 7 g: p = 0.013; impacts 6.1–7 g: p = 0.002; impacts 5.1–6 g: p = 0.006). In male skiers, the distances traveled at different speed thresholds have a direct relation to the ranking of skiers, but this ideal threshold decreased as the technicality of the discipline increased. In the case of female skiers, although no relation was seen with the speed thresholds, greater distances covered at medium accelerations improved skiing performance. The external load in alpine skiing varied based on sex and discipline. This information could be essential to develop sex-specific and discipline-specific training programs in alpine skiing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Heart Rate Variability and Physical Demands of In-Season Youth Elite Soccer Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1391; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041391 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1201
Abstract
Monitoring fatigue and performance is important for adjusting training loads in soccer. Therefore, knowing the status of the player when applying a training stimulus is key to optimizing the players’ development. This study aims to evaluate the interaction between internal and external load, [...] Read more.
Monitoring fatigue and performance is important for adjusting training loads in soccer. Therefore, knowing the status of the player when applying a training stimulus is key to optimizing the players’ development. This study aims to evaluate the interaction between internal and external load, during training and matches, in an elite youth soccer team. Methods: seventeen youth players of the highest Spanish category were monitored with GPS devices during training and matches, as well as recording their nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV). We employed a linear mixed model to assess the physical demands between training and matches, and to compare the HRV variables. Results: a higher total distance (+2993.35–5746.56 m; ES = 1.4), distance at high intensity (+641.24–1907 m; ES = 1.5), sprint distance (+350.46–795.05 m; ES = 2.1), number of sprints (+18.38–41.58; ES = 1.9), and number of repeated sprints (+5.91–15.30; ES = 1.7) (all p < 0.001), but not in the number of accelerations, were reported during the matches when compared to the training sessions during the 11 weeks. The analysis of the HRV variables showed no significant differences between the accumulated values during a training week, providing similar results pre-match or post-match (p > 0.05). The LF/HFRATIO showed a negative influence on the total distance ran, distance at high intensity, distance in sprint, number of sprints, and repeated sprint. RRMEAN was positively related to the sprint number. Conclusion: the results of the present study suggest that nocturnal HRV variables are not different between pre-match and post-match. Furthermore, it suggests that LF/HFRATIO and RRMEAN during pre-match can determine the external load that the player will be able to complete during the match. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effects of Manual Therapy on Fatigue, Pain, and Psychological Aspects in Women with Fibromyalgia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4611; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124611 - 26 Jun 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4085
Abstract
Fibromyalgia is a condition characterised by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive disorders, and mood disturbance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy technique performed with moderate digital pressure in women with fibromyalgia [...] Read more.
Fibromyalgia is a condition characterised by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive disorders, and mood disturbance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy technique performed with moderate digital pressure in women with fibromyalgia (n = 24). In this randomised, controlled trial, the participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group or placebo group. The experimental group was assisted with manual therapy sessions based on connective tissue massage, whereas the placebo group was “treated” with ultrasound sessions performed without conductive gel and with the machine turned off as the placebo. Fatigue severity scale (FSS), visual analogical scale (VAS), Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and profile of mood states (POMS-29) were completed before and after the intervention. In the experimental group (manual therapy), significant results were obtained on a VAS scale, referring to the neck pain in patients with fibromyalgia (p < 0.001). Correlations showed a relationship between fatigue and sleep variables (R = 0.411; p = 0.046) and pain variables with the POMS anger-hostility subscale (R = 0.436; p = 0.033). Although the size of the sample could be a limitation, the study concluded that the application of manual therapy in fibromyalgia patients performed with moderate pressure for 15 min on the posterior cervical musculature decreased the perception of pain, muscle fatigue, and the state of tension-anxiety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Physiological Predictors of Competition Performance in CrossFit Athletes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103699 - 24 May 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2759
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the physiological variables that predict competition performance during a CrossFit competition. Fifteen male amateur CrossFit athletes (age, 35 ± 9 years; CrossFit experience, 40 ± 27 months) performed a series of laboratory-based tests (incremental load [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the physiological variables that predict competition performance during a CrossFit competition. Fifteen male amateur CrossFit athletes (age, 35 ± 9 years; CrossFit experience, 40 ± 27 months) performed a series of laboratory-based tests (incremental load test for deep full squat and bench press; squat, countermovement and drop jump tests; and incremental running and Wingate tests) that were studied as potential predictors of CrossFit performance. Thereafter, they performed the five Workouts of the Day (WODs) corresponding to the CrossFit Games Open 2019, and we assessed the relationship between the laboratory-based markers and CrossFit performance with regression analyses. Overall CrossFit performance (i.e., final ranking considering the sum of all WODs, as assessed by number of repetitions, time spent in exercises or weight lifted) was significantly related to jump ability, mean and peak power output during the Wingate test, relative maximum strength for the deep full squat and the bench press, and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and speed during the incremental test (all p < 0.05, r = 0.58–0.75). However, the relationship between CrossFit Performance and most laboratory markers varied depending on the analyzed WOD. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that measures of lower-body muscle power (particularly jump ability) and VO2max explained together most of the variance (R2 = 81%, p < 0.001) in overall CrossFit performance. CrossFit performance is therefore associated with different power-, strength-, and aerobic-related markers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Effect of Natural Turf, Artificial Turf, and Sand Surfaces on Sprint Performance. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9478; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249478 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1470
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of natural turf, artificial turf, and sand on sprint performance in different sports and to determine how the sport surface affects sprint performance. A systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, Web of Sciences, [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of natural turf, artificial turf, and sand on sprint performance in different sports and to determine how the sport surface affects sprint performance. A systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, Web of Sciences, and SPORTDiscus databases. Out of 5644 studies, 11 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The studies were very heterogeneous, as they examined different structural characteristics or quality parameters. The studies on natural turf and sand showed significant improvements on sprint speed during training. On the other hand, the analysis of fatigue did not reveal significant differences in the deterioration of sprint speed on both natural and artificial turf. Significance was set at p < 0.05. In conclusion, although lower performance in sprint was reported on sand, further studies are needed to explain the differences in sprint on natural and artificial turf. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education and Exercise Prehabilitation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop