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Physical Activity and Wellbeing across the Lifespan

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2024 | Viewed by 18296

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health, Victoria University Wellington, Kelburn, Wellington 6012, New Zealand
Interests: physical activity; wellbeing; mental health; happiness; sport-for-development; post-conflict; low-income
Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, Institute of Sport, Physical Education, and Health Sciences, Moray House School of Education and Sport, University of Edinburgh, Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 8AQ, UK
Interests: physical activity; wellbeing; active transport; walking; cycling; physical activity measurement; physical activity messaging
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the wake of a global pandemic, there is an increasing interest in maintaining and improving the wellbeing at the individual, community, and population level. Wellbeing has been broadly defined across different disciplines and includes concepts such as mental and physical health, social connections, subjective wellbeing, cultural identity, knowledge and skills, and environmental connection. Physical activity has the potential to make a significant contribution to a broad range of these wellbeing outcomes, but the nature and strength of the evidence varies across sectors. This includes investigation into the wellbeing implications of different dosages and types of physical activity participation as well as the quality of those experiences in different population groups.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) provides a platform for the publication of research into the relationship between physical activity and wellbeing. Submissions from all relevant disciplines are encouraged; the intention is to bring together papers that highlight the vast array of approaches currently being applied in this space. Specifically, we are seeking to publish scholarly contributions that highlight the different methods and measures currently being used to explore the relationship between physical activity and wellbeing. Manuscripts that explore any component of physical activity participation and any domain of wellbeing are welcome.

Dr. Justin Richards
Dr. Paul Kelly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • sport
  • active transport
  • walking
  • cycling
  • wellbeing
  • mental health
  • happiness
  • cognition
  • flourishing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 331 KiB  
Article
“Balance Is Better”: The Wellbeing Benefits of Participating in a Breadth of Sports across a Variety of Settings during Adolescence
by Oliver W. A. Wilson, Chris Whatman, Simon Walters, Sierra Keung, Dion Enari, Alex Chiet, Sarah-Kate Millar, Lesley Ferkins, Erica Hinckson, Jeremy Hapeta, Michael Sam and Justin Richards
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8597; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148597 - 14 Jul 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2689
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine how wellbeing is associated with the setting in which sport participation takes place and the breadth of sport participation. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, deprivation, (dis)ability status), recreational physical activity, and wellbeing were assessed in [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine how wellbeing is associated with the setting in which sport participation takes place and the breadth of sport participation. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, deprivation, (dis)ability status), recreational physical activity, and wellbeing were assessed in cohorts of adolescents (11–17 years) between 2017 and 2019 in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Better wellbeing was associated with participation in any sport vs. none (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.30–1.90). Better wellbeing was also associated with participating in any coached sport training (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.33–1.66), competitive sport (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.18–1.49), social sport (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.18–1.49), and uncoached sport training (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.03–1.31) compared to non-participation in the given setting. Wellbeing was not associated with participation in physical education or solo sport. Participating in sport in three to five different settings (3 settings: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.01–1.44; 4 settings: OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.09–1.62; 5 settings: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.07–1.75) or sports (3 sports: OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04–1.51; 4 sports: OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.06–1.61; 5 sports: OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.05–1.69) was associated with better wellbeing compared to participation in a single setting or sport, respectively. A balanced approach to participating across a variety of sport settings and sports that are facilitated by quality coaches may offer the largest additional wellbeing value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Wellbeing across the Lifespan)
9 pages, 342 KiB  
Article
The Value of Sport: Wellbeing Benefits of Sport Participation during Adolescence
by Oliver W. A. Wilson, Chris Whatman, Simon Walters, Sierra Keung, Dion Enari, Andy Rogers, Sarah-Kate Millar, Lesley Ferkins, Erica Hinckson, Jeremy Hapeta, Michael Sam and Justin Richards
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8579; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148579 - 14 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 7062
Abstract
Insight into the unique benefits of sport participation above and beyond those associated with participation in other physical activities among adolescents is limited in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between wellbeing and organised sport [...] Read more.
Insight into the unique benefits of sport participation above and beyond those associated with participation in other physical activities among adolescents is limited in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between wellbeing and organised sport participation among adolescents whilst accounting for demographic characteristics and other recreational physical activity. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, deprivation, (dis)ability status), organized sport, recreational physical activity, and wellbeing were assessed in cohorts of NZ adolescents (11–17 years) between 2017 and 2019. After adjusting for demographics, better wellbeing was associated with participation in any recreational physical activity (OR = 2.49, 95%CI = 1.97–3.13), meeting physical activity recommendations (OR = 1.63, 95%CI = 1.47–1.81), and each additional hour of recreational physical activity (OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 1.02–1.04). After adjusting for demographics and overall recreational physical activity participation, better wellbeing was also associated with participation in any organized sport (OR = 1.66, 95%CI = 1.49–1.86), and each additional hour of organized sport (OR = 1.09, 95%CI = 1.07–1.11). Although participation in recreational physical activity appears to be beneficial for wellbeing, organized sport appears to offer unique additional wellbeing benefits. Positive experiences of organized sport participation may offer additional wellbeing value above and beyond other recreational physical activity types in young people who are active. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Wellbeing across the Lifespan)

Review

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10 pages, 699 KiB  
Review
A Rapid Review Exploring the Role of Yoga in Healing Psychological Trauma
by Arabella English, Elizabeth McKibben, Divya Sivaramakrishnan, Niamh Hart, Justin Richards and Paul Kelly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316180 - 3 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3815
Abstract
The evidence regarding the benefits of yoga for treating psychological trauma is well-established; however, there is a paucity of qualitative reviews exploring this topic. The purpose of this rapid review is to gain a deeper understanding of the impact that yoga can have [...] Read more.
The evidence regarding the benefits of yoga for treating psychological trauma is well-established; however, there is a paucity of qualitative reviews exploring this topic. The purpose of this rapid review is to gain a deeper understanding of the impact that yoga can have on people with a history of psychological trauma and to reveal barriers and facilitators to the uptake of yoga in this cohort, from a qualitative perspective. The Ovid(EMBASE), Ovid(MEDLINE), PsycINFO, PubMed, and SPORTDiscus databases were searched using key terms. The systematic search generated 148 records, and 11 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria. The following main impacts of yoga on participants were identified: feeling an increased sense of self-compassion; feeling more centred; developing their coping skills; having a better mind–body relationship; and improving their relationships with others. The main barriers were also identified: concerns initiating yoga; time and motivational issues; and the costs and location of classes. The main facilitator was the feeling of safety generated in the trauma-informed yoga classes. This review suggests that yoga offers great potential in the field of trauma recovery. Despite this, more high-quality research with rigorous methodologies is called for to allow this field to advance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Wellbeing across the Lifespan)
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20 pages, 1428 KiB  
Review
Intervention of Physical Activity for University Students with Anxiety and Depression during the COVID-19 Pandemic Prevention and Control Period: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Qingyuan Luo, Peng Zhang, Yijia Liu, Xiujie Ma and George Jennings
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15338; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215338 - 20 Nov 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3938
Abstract
(1) Background: Although physical activity has been widely recognized as an effective way to improve anxiety and depression, we lack a systematic summary of research on improving anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aims to systematically analyze how physical activity [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Although physical activity has been widely recognized as an effective way to improve anxiety and depression, we lack a systematic summary of research on improving anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aims to systematically analyze how physical activity impacts on this situation in college students during COVID-19. (2) Methods: Both Chinese and English databases (PubMed the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang) were analyzed. All the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about physical activity intervention for this were included. We received eight eligible RCT experiments before the retrieval time (4 October 2022) in the meta-analysis. (3) Results: Physical activity benefits for college students with significant anxiety were (SMD = −0.50; 95% CI = −0.83 to −0.17; I2 = 84%; p < 0.001; Z = 2.98;) and depression (SMD = −0.62; 95% CI = −0.99 to −0.25; I2 = 80.7%; p < 0.001; Z = 3.27). Subgroup analyses showed physical activity of different intensities significantly impacted on improving college students’ depression and anxiety, but physical activity of 6 < 9 Mets intensity had a greater effect on anxiety than on depression. Interventions of eight weeks or less performed better than those of over eight weeks while interventions less than four times per week had a significant effect on improving the situation. The overall effect of a single intervention of 30 min was more effective than one of over 60 min. (4) Conclusion: Physical activities can effectively improve the situation of anxiety and depression for college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, a higher quality RCT experiment is needed to prove it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Wellbeing across the Lifespan)
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