Special Issue "Advances in Personalized Exercise Prescription for Chronic Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Lance Dalleck
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Recreation, Exercise & Sport Science Department, Western Colorado University, Gunnison, CO 81231, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well-established that regular exercise training confers numerous health and wellness benefits. Accordingly, exercise remains a central feature of prevention, rehabilitation, and other public-health-related programs. However, not all individuals respond positively to exercise. Indeed, there is considerable individual variability in training adaptations, including the phenomenon of ‘responders’ and ‘non-responders’. This variability in training responsiveness is not well-understood and may be attributable to various factors, including the absence of set definitions in the literature for responders/non-responders and a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise prescription.

This Special Issue seeks original papers on advances in personalized exercise prescription for chronic disease prevention and rehabilitation. We also welcome high-quality systematic reviews related to these matters. I would be pleased if this Special Issue serves as a trigger for the provision of insightful data for the design of personalized exercise prescriptions that will optimize the training responsiveness of prevention and rehabilitation programs.

Prof. Lance Dalleck
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Primary prevention
  • Translational research
  • Exercise non-responders
  • Personalized medicine
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Training responsiveness
  • Response heterogeneity
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Threshold-based training
  • Exercise training
  • Ventilatory threshold
  • Verification procedure

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Inter-Individual Variability in Metabolic Syndrome Severity Score and VO2max Changes Following Personalized, Community-Based Exercise Programming
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4855; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234855 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
This study sought to examine the effectiveness of a personalized, community-based exercise program at reducing MetS severity and consequently Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. One-hundred and fifty physically inactive participants (aged 18–83 years) were randomized to a non-exercise [...] Read more.
This study sought to examine the effectiveness of a personalized, community-based exercise program at reducing MetS severity and consequently Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. One-hundred and fifty physically inactive participants (aged 18–83 years) were randomized to a non-exercise control group (n = 75; instructed to continue their usual lifestyle habits) or treatment group (n = 75). Participants randomized to the treatment group completed a 12 week personalized exercise training program based on the American Council on Exercise (ACE) Integrated Fitness Training (IFT) model guidelines. Z-scores were derived from levels of metabolic syndrome risk factors to determine the severity of MetS (MetS z-score). After 12 weeks, the treatment group showed a significant favorable change in MetS z-score, whereas the control group demonstrated increased severity of the syndrome (between-group difference, p < 0.05). The proportion of MetS z-score responders (Δ > −0.48) was greater following the exercise intervention (71%, 50/70) compared to control (10%, 7/72) (between group difference, p < 0.001). The inter-individual variability in VO2max change also showed a similar trend. These findings provide critical translational evidence demonstrating that personalized exercise programming based upon the ACE IFT model guidelines can be successfully implemented within the community setting to reduce T2DM and CVD risk. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High-Intensity Interval Circuit Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training on Functional Ability and Body Mass Index in Middle-Aged and Older Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4205; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214205 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
The literature suggests that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) to improve functional ability. However, there is no evidence on including HIIT in a circuit programme (HIICT). Our objective was to determine what type of training (HIICT [...] Read more.
The literature suggests that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) to improve functional ability. However, there is no evidence on including HIIT in a circuit programme (HIICT). Our objective was to determine what type of training (HIICT or MICT) induces greater adaptations in the functional ability and body mass index of middle-aged and older women. The study used a quasi-experimental randomized controlled trial with 54 participants (age = 67.8 ± 6.2 years). Participants were randomly allocated to HIICT (n = 18), MICT (n = 18) or a non-exercise control group (CG; n = 18). The participants in the HIICT or MICT groups trained twice a week (1 h/session) for 18 weeks. Forty-one subjects were analysed (HIICT; n = 17, MICT; n = 12, CG; n = 12). Five subjects presented adverse events during the study. Strength, gait, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance and body mass index were measured. A significant training x group interaction was found in the arm curl test, where HIICT was statistically better than MICT and CG. Likewise, HIICT was statistically better than the CG in the BMI interaction. In lower limb strength, gait/dynamic balance and cardiorespiratory fitness, both HIICT and MICT were statistically better than the CG. In conclusion, HIICT generated better adaptations in upper limb strength than MICT. Likewise, HIICT generated better adaptations in body mass index than CG. Finally, both HIICT and MICT had a similar influence on strength, cardiorespiratory fitness and gait/dynamic balance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Power Production Asymmetry during Cycling in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183445 - 17 Sep 2019
Abstract
Lower limb asymmetries have been observed in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and have been associated with mobility impairment. An incremental cycling test was performed on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power output (PPO) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Then, [...] Read more.
Lower limb asymmetries have been observed in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and have been associated with mobility impairment. An incremental cycling test was performed on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power output (PPO) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Then, participants cycled at 50%, 60%, and 70% of their PPO to assess the contribution of each lower limb to power production. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to detect group × intensity differences in power production asymmetry. Eight PwMS and six healthy individuals (Non-MS) completed the study. No statistically significant (p > 0.05) group × intensity interactions or main effects were present when examining between-limb differences in power production. The current data do not indicate a statistically significant difference in power production asymmetry between groups and exercise intensities. Previous research has established a 10% difference between contralateral limbs as a threshold for asymmetry. The average asymmetry in power production in PwMS exceeded the 10% threshold at all measured outputs, suggesting the presence of asymmetry in power production. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Blood Lactate Concentration Is Not Related to the Increase in Cardiorespiratory Fitness Induced by High Intensity Interval Training
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2845; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162845 - 09 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background: There is individual responsiveness to exercise training as not all individuals experience increases in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), which does not benefit health status considering the association between VO2max and mortality. Approximately 50% of the training response is [...] Read more.
Background: There is individual responsiveness to exercise training as not all individuals experience increases in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), which does not benefit health status considering the association between VO2max and mortality. Approximately 50% of the training response is genetic, with the other 50% accounted for by variations in dietary intake, sleep, recovery, and the metabolic stress of training. This study examined if the blood lactate (BLa) response to high intensity interval training (HIIT) as well as habitual dietary intake and sleep duration are associated with the resultant change in VO2max (ΔVO2max). Methods: Fourteen individuals (age and VO2max = 27 ± 8 years and 38 ± 4 mL/kg/min, respectively) performed nine sessions of HIIT at 130% ventilatory threshold. BLa was measured during the first and last session of training. In addition, sleep duration and energy intake were assessed. Results: Data showed that VO2max increased with HIIT (p = 0.007). No associations occurred between ΔVO2max and BLa (r = 0.44, p = 0.10), energy intake (r = 0.38, p = 0.18), or sleep duration (r = 0.14, p = 0.62). However, there was a significant association between training heart rate (HR) and ΔVO2max (r = 0.62, p = 0.02). Conclusions: When HIIT is prescribed according to a metabolic threshold, energy intake, sleep status, and BLa do not predict ΔVO2max, yet the HR response to training is associated with the ΔVO2max. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop