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Special Issue "Occupational Cancer: From Early Detection to Prevention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lode Godderis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre for Environment and Health, University of Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2. IDEWE, Knowledge, Information and Research Center, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium
Interests: Prof. Dr. Lode Godderis is full professor at the Centre for Environment and Health of the University of Leuven. He investigates the impact of environment on health by unravelling the underlying epigenetic mechanism and, also, the reverse, how health can affect work (dis)ability. He leads the division of the Laboratory of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. This lab analyses air samples and biological samples of workers. He is also director of Knowledge, Information and Research at IDEWE (External Service for Prevention and Protection at Work), where he leads a team specialized in studies on psycho-social risks and work-related diseases. He is the current chair of Modernet; an international network for the development of techniques for discovering trends in work-related diseases and tracing new and emerging risks. A full list of his projects and publications are available at http://www.kuleuven.be/wieiswie/en/person/00005874.
Prof. Dr. Jukka Takala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Commission of Occupational Health, ICOH, Rome, Italy
Interests: occupational health and safety globally; occupational cancer globally

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Work contributes significantly to the burden of cancer. Because of the latent nature, it remains difficult to determine the occupational causes and clinically diagnose work-related cancers. Consequently, it often takes decades between the introduction of a substance in the market, the reporting of the first suspected cases, research findings, and finally legal restriction or banning. In this Special Issue, we welcome original and review papers on the relationship between occupational exposures and cancer. We aim to close the gap between early detection and prevention through publications on

- the identification of occupational hazards,

- the diagnosis and reporting of (clusters of) clinical cases,

- the assessment of occupational exposure to carcinogens

- epidemiological studies, including the determination of the burden of work-related cancer

- impact studies on the prevention of work-related cancers

Occupational cancer is preventable and your contribution will help to reduce the number of cases, the understanding of risks and measures to control them. This Special Issue has the ambition to inspire and stimulate institutions and stakeholders to respond faster to early warning signals.

Prof. Dr. Lode Godderis
Prof. Dr. Jukka Takala
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hazard identification
  • cluster
  • diagnosis
  • exposure assessment
  • risk analysis
  • burden of disease
  • mechanism
  • genotoxicity
  • epigenetics
  • epidemiology
  • preventions
  • measures

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

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Review
Exhaled Breath Analysis in Diagnosis of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1110; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031110 - 10 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1997
Abstract
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is mainly related to previous asbestos exposure. There is still dearth of information on non-invasive biomarkers to detect MPM at early stages. Human studies on exhaled breath biomarkers of cancer and asbestos-related diseases show encouraging results. The aim of [...] Read more.
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is mainly related to previous asbestos exposure. There is still dearth of information on non-invasive biomarkers to detect MPM at early stages. Human studies on exhaled breath biomarkers of cancer and asbestos-related diseases show encouraging results. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview on the current knowledge about exhaled breath analysis in MPM diagnosis. A systematic review was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and Web of Science databases to identify relevant studies. Quality assessment was done by the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Six studies were identified, all of which showed fair quality and explored volatile organic compounds (VOC) based breath profile using Gas Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS), Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to Multi-capillary Columns (IMS–MCC) or pattern-recognition technologies. Sample sizes varied between 39 and 330. Some compounds (i.e, cyclohexane, P3, P5, P50, P71, diethyl ether, limonene, nonanal, VOC IK 1287) that can be indicative of MPM development in asbestos exposed population were identified with high diagnostic accuracy rates. E-nose studies reported breathprints being able to distinguish MPM from asbestos exposed individuals with high sensitivity and a negative predictive value. Small sample sizes and methodological diversities among studies limit the translation of results into clinical practice. More prospective studies with standardized methodologies should be conducted on larger populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Cancer: From Early Detection to Prevention)
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Review
Risk of Cancer for Workers Exposed to Antimony Compounds: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4474; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224474 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 1218
Abstract
Background: Antimony (Sb) trioxide and antimony trisulfide are “2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans” and “3: Unclassifiable” according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded that antimony trioxide “is reasonably anticipated to be a human [...] Read more.
Background: Antimony (Sb) trioxide and antimony trisulfide are “2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans” and “3: Unclassifiable” according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded that antimony trioxide “is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on studies in rats and mice”. We investigated the cancer hazard of antimony compounds for workers, a population with high exposure to antimony substances. Methods: Using the “Guidelines for performing systematic reviews in the development of toxicity factors” (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) 2017) as a guidance, we established a human and an animal toxicology data stream in Medline and ToxLine. Data from this review were applied in a human health risk assessment. Results: A final pool of 10 occupational and 13 animal toxicology articles resulted after application of TCEQ guidelines. Conclusions: Antimony carcinogenicity evidence involving workers is inadequate, based on confounding, small sample sizes, incomparability across studies, and inadequate reference populations. An increased lung cancer risk cannot be excluded. Evidence for lung neoplasms caused by antimony trioxide inhalation in experimental animals is sufficient. Overall, carcinogenicity in workers is probable (International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) 2A). It remains unclear from what occupational exposure duration and dose this effect arises and whether exposure threshold values should be reconsidered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Cancer: From Early Detection to Prevention)

Other

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Conference Report
Improving Education and Training to Reduce the Burden of Occupational Cancer. The Riga-European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM) Statement on Work-Related Cancer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2279; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072279 - 28 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1176
Abstract
Reducing the burden of occupational cancers (OCs) is currently one of the most challenging Occupational Health (OH) issues. The European Union (EU) has made efforts to improve the existing legal framework and developed specific legislation aimed at reducing the burden of OC. However, [...] Read more.
Reducing the burden of occupational cancers (OCs) is currently one of the most challenging Occupational Health (OH) issues. The European Union (EU) has made efforts to improve the existing legal framework and developed specific legislation aimed at reducing the burden of OC. However, available data suggest that OC are underreported. In August 2019, the European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM) adopted a statement that highlighted the importance of improving the education and training of Medical Doctors (MDs) to facilitate improvements in recognizing and reporting OC. To achieve this, EASOM proposes to promote OH education and training of MDs at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, foster harmonization of OH education and teaching standards and programs across EU countries, and enhance cooperation between universities and international scientific associations. Finally, we suggest that occupational data should be recorded in cancer and medical registers. By engaging MDs more fully in the debate about OCs, they will become more aware of the Occupational Physician’s role in reducing the burden of OCs and, furthermore, embed consideration of occupation as a potential cause of cancer into their own practice. These interventions will help promote the implementation of policies and interventions aimed to reduce OC in the workplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Cancer: From Early Detection to Prevention)
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