Next Article in Journal
More Physical Activity after Concussion Is Associated with Faster Return to Play among Adolescents
Next Article in Special Issue
The Potential Role of Hamstring Extensibility on Sagittal Pelvic Tilt, Sagittal Spinal Curves and Recurrent Low Back Pain in Team Sports Players: A Gender Perspective Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Unemployment Syndrome during COVID-19: A Comparison of Three Population Groups
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Investigation of Knee Injury Profiles among Iranian Elite Karatekas: Observations from a Cross-Sectional Study
Article

Sports Specialization and Sports-Related Injuries in Japanese School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Descriptive Study

1
Faculty of Education, Mie University, Tsu 514-8507, Japan
2
Course for Health and Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Mie University, Tsu 514-8507, Japan
3
Department of Sports Science, Juntendo University, Chiba 270-1695, Japan
4
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577, Japan
5
Research Team for Promoting Independence and Mental Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: School of Health and Sport Sciences, Chukyo University, Aichi 470-0393, Japan.
Academic Editors: Filipe Manuel Clemente, Daniel Castillo and Javier Raya-González
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7369; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147369
Received: 10 June 2021 / Revised: 5 July 2021 / Accepted: 6 July 2021 / Published: 9 July 2021
Although early sports specialization is associated with sports-related injuries, relevant quantitative studies on young non-elite athletes, the majority of sports participants, are scarce. We described sports specialization time points and the characteristics of sports-related injuries. Undergraduate students at a university in Japan (n = 830) recalled their history of sports participation from elementary to high school and sports-related injuries in a self-administered questionnaire. Of 570 valid respondents, 486 (85%) engaged in sports at least once. Significantly more respondents played multiple sports in upper elementary school (30%) than in other school categories (1–23%). In junior high and high schools, 90% and 99% played only one sport, respectively. Of the 486 respondents who played sports, 263 (54%) had experienced acute or overuse injuries. The proportion of injured participants significantly differed by school category: lower elementary school (4%), upper elementary school (21%), junior high (35%), and high school (41%). The proportions of acute or overuse injuries in males were higher than those in females. In conclusion, this study clarified a slight variation in sports items, particularly in junior high and high schools, which demonstrates 13 years as the age of beginning specialization in a single sport. More than half of the non-elite athletes experienced sports-related injuries. Injuries were frequently observed in males and those in junior high and high schools. View Full-Text
Keywords: extra-curriculum; early specialization; athletic injuries extra-curriculum; early specialization; athletic injuries
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Shigematsu, R.; Katoh, S.; Suzuki, K.; Nakata, Y.; Sasai, H. Sports Specialization and Sports-Related Injuries in Japanese School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Descriptive Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7369. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147369

AMA Style

Shigematsu R, Katoh S, Suzuki K, Nakata Y, Sasai H. Sports Specialization and Sports-Related Injuries in Japanese School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Descriptive Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7369. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147369

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shigematsu, Ryosuke, Shuta Katoh, Koya Suzuki, Yoshio Nakata, and Hiroyuki Sasai. 2021. "Sports Specialization and Sports-Related Injuries in Japanese School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Descriptive Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7369. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147369

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop