ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Territorial and Social Health Inequalities"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Cindy M. Padilla
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Univ Rennes, EHESP, REPERES (Recherche en pharmaco-épidémiologie et recours aux soins) – EA 7449, F-35000 Rennes, France
Interests: spatial epidemiology; geographic variation; birth outcome; infant mortality, screening; breast cancer; social inequalities; deprivation; healthcare access; environmental nuisances; clustering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue featuring original research and systematic reviews on territorial and social health inequalities in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

A major contemporary challenge is the provision of a satisfactory, healthy, and equitable standard of living for current and future generations. Social inequality in health has increasingly been recognized as an important public health issue. Certain socioeconomic groups bear a disproportionate burden of environmental externalities and are vulnerable to the health effects resulting from this exposition.

The well-known social gradient in health has endured over time across societies and despite changes in the major causes of death. Socioeconomic health inequality is evident across space, between countries and within countries. Reducing health inequalities involves the characterization and identification of how factors accumulate and interact in an area, including the determination of how the enduring association between socioeconomic position and health can be understood.

While the body of research on individuals and contextual determinants is growing and well known, knowledge gaps related to successful comprehensive strategies must be filled to reduce social health inequalities. For this Special Issue, we invite submissions that examine the cumulative determinants of socioeconomic health inequality and provide innovative tools to investigate the mechanisms underlying the association between socio-economic position and health.

Dr. Cindy M. Padilla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • socioeconomic
  • deprivation
  • inequalities
  • health system
  • access to care
  • geographic variation
  • chronic disease
  • adult and childhood disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Assessment of Selected Aspects of the Quality of Life of Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042107 - 22 Feb 2021
Viewed by 848
Abstract
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is, next to obesity and asthma, the most common chronic disease in children in Poland. T1D is not only a medical challenge, but it also affects all areas of a sick child’s life and family functionality. New forms [...] Read more.
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is, next to obesity and asthma, the most common chronic disease in children in Poland. T1D is not only a medical challenge, but it also affects all areas of a sick child’s life and family functionality. New forms of therapy facilitate the daily management of the disease, but their availability is limited and partly dependent on socioeconomic status. This study aimed to assess the incidence and interrelationships between the child’s health condition and the applied therapy model, and selected aspects of the child’s family functionality and access to health and care services. The survey involved 206 child and youth caregivers with T1D who are members of Facebook support groups. The analysis of the obtained results revealed the existence of links between family income level and the type of insulin therapy applied. Children from families with a better financial situation (subjective and objective) were more likely to have additional medical consultations and make more frequent control visits. In families with a higher level of income, the T1D-induced restriction of child activity was less frequent. Living outside of urban centers was associated with a reduced availability of care or educational facilities adapted to take care of a child with T1D. No statistically significant correlations were observed between demographic and economic factors and the child’s health status expressed by the occurrence of complications. The incidence of the latter, however, affected the child’s family situation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Territorial and Social Health Inequalities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Family Income Gradients in Adolescent Obesity, Overweight and Adiposity Persist in Extremely Deprived and Extremely Affluent Neighbourhoods but Not in Middle-Class Neighbourhoods: Evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020418 - 08 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2005
Abstract
We investigated whether family income gradients in obesity, overweight, and adiposity persist at geographic-level deprivation quintiles using a nationally representative cohort of UK adolescents. Data from 11,714 eligible adolescents from the sixth sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study (14 years old) were analysed [...] Read more.
We investigated whether family income gradients in obesity, overweight, and adiposity persist at geographic-level deprivation quintiles using a nationally representative cohort of UK adolescents. Data from 11,714 eligible adolescents from the sixth sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study (14 years old) were analysed in this study. The International Obesity Task Force age- and sex-specific thresholds were used to define obesity and overweight. Self-reported family income was standardized using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s equivalised income scale. Geographic-level deprivation was defined by the index of multiple deprivation 2004. Results showed that the prevalence of obesity and overweight was 8.0% and 27.2%, respectively. Mean percentage body fat was 16.9% (standard error, SE = 0.2%) in male and 27.3% (SE = 0.1%) in female adolescents. Risk of obesity, overweight, and adiposity increased with decreasing family income quintiles (p for trend <0.001). After stratifying by geographic-level deprivation quintiles, a U-shaped association emerged, whereby family income gradients in the risk of adolescent obesity and adiposity persisted in extremely affluent and extremely deprived neighbourhoods but attenuated to non-significance in middle-class neighbourhoods. These results focus on the findings from England. Recognition of the persistence of inequalities in the risk of obesity in the most deprived and affluent neighbourhoods may be necessary in planning public health resources and interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Territorial and Social Health Inequalities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop