Special Issue "Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ewen C. D. Todd
Website
Guest Editor
Adjunct Professor, Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: foodborne disease, food poisoning, hazard analysis critical control points, root cause analysis, foodborne pathogens and toxins, seafood toxins, cross-contamination, problems in food service and food processing, expert witness for court cases involving food contamination
Prof. Dr. Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Cordoba (Spain), 14014 Cordoba, Spain
Interests: food hygiene; quantitative microbial risk assessment; predictive microbiology; food safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue entitled “Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment” is being organized for the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Despite decades of government and industry interventions, foodborne disease remains unexpectedly high in both developed and developing nations. For instance, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in six persons in the United States suffers from gastroenteritis each year, with up to 3,000 fatalities arising from consumption of contaminated food. According to the WHO Initiative to Estimate the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases, 31 global hazards caused 600 million foodborne illnesses and 420,000 deaths in 2010; diarrhoeal disease agents were the leading cause of these in most regions. Since we know that most foodborne diseases are preventable, these are astonishing figures for the 21st century. We are familiar with some of the underlying conditions: unsafe water used for the cleaning and processing of food, poor food-production processes, inadequate storage, and food-handling practices including infected food workers and cross-contamination of food. These can be coupled with inadequate or poorly enforced regulatory standards and industry compliance. However, knowledge of these is not enough. Making advances in prevention and control practices requires a suite of interlinked actions from improvements in the investigation of complaints and illnesses to finding the root cause of outbreaks; applying rapid and accurate identification of the hazards present; determining the conditions in which pathogens grow and multiply in order to eliminate or reduce these numbers; developing targeted intervention strategies; understanding human behavior with respect to food processing and preparation; producing effective educational and training programs; evaluating the risks of existing and modified food production and preparation practices; predicting how effective potential interventions would be, and introducing effective and enforceable codes of practice for the different harvesting, processing, and preparing industry components.

This Special Issue is open to the subject area of Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment. For detailed information on the journal, I refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Prof. Ewen C. D. Todd
Prof. Dr. Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

Foodborne disease surveillance and monitoring

  • Representative surveillance sites like FoodNet
  • Expert elicitation
  • Food attribution
  • Social media to collect illness data
  • Foodborne disease outbreak investigations
  • Determining root cause analysis
  • Improved surveillance
  • Estimating cases and burden of foodborne diseases
  • Rapid communication of food contamination/food poisoning issues

Prevention and control strategies

  • The role of food codes including Codex Alimentarius
  • National and local standards, guidelines and regulations
  • Industry association studies and recommendations
  • Prerequisite programs/sanitation
  • Hazard analysis critical control points
  • Food Safety Objectives, Performance Objectives, etc.
  • Novel pathogen inactivation methods
  • Trend analysis/ statistical process control
  • Traceback/blockchain along the food chain

Microbiological testing and identification

  • Whole genome sequencing
  • Culture independent diagnostic testing

The human element

  • Food safety education and worker training
  • Food safety culture and trust
  • Understanding behavior of food preparers
  • Exploring artificial intelligence

Risk analysis

  • Quantitative microbiological risk assessment
  • Qualitative risk assessment
  • Risk profiles
  • Predictive modeling
  • Dose response assessment
  • Exposure assessment
  • Risk management
  • Risk communication
  • Future of the risk assessment process

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5129; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145129 - 16 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 448
Abstract
“Food-borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment” is a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on understanding how food-borne disease is still a global threat to health today and to be able to target strategies to reduce its [...] Read more.
“Food-borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment” is a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on understanding how food-borne disease is still a global threat to health today and to be able to target strategies to reduce its prevalence [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Avian Influenza—Factors Affecting Consumers’ Purchase Intentions toward Poultry Products
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214139 - 28 Oct 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1027
Abstract
Recently, continuing outbreaks of avian influenza in China have not only caused great loss to the agricultural sector but also brought fear and distrust to consumers, seriously undermining consumer confidence in chicken products. We investigated consumers’ purchase intentions during avian influenza outbreaks by [...] Read more.
Recently, continuing outbreaks of avian influenza in China have not only caused great loss to the agricultural sector but also brought fear and distrust to consumers, seriously undermining consumer confidence in chicken products. We investigated consumers’ purchase intentions during avian influenza outbreaks by examining a regionally representative sample of 330 consumers in Guangzhou. With respect to 7 kinds of attributes, the ordered logit analysis indicated that possible health threat and uncertainty of the origin of poultry products may cause concern among consumers and cause them to avoid purchasing chicken products. Media reports have a great influence on consumers’ intentions to purchase chicken products during avian influenza outbreaks. Overall, this study suggests establishing an effective mechanism of public knowledge (of chicken products’ safety and quality) enhancement, in order to curb misleading media reports during avian influenza outbreaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)
Open AccessArticle
Cognitive Biases of Consumers’ Risk Perception of Foodborne Diseases in China: Examining Anchoring Effect
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2268; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132268 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1192
Abstract
Consumer cognitive biases arise from judgment and decision-making due to their limitations in information processing. As one of the important cognitive biases, the anchoring effect plays a significant role in interfering with consumers’ risk perception. With a stratified random approach, we collected survey [...] Read more.
Consumer cognitive biases arise from judgment and decision-making due to their limitations in information processing. As one of the important cognitive biases, the anchoring effect plays a significant role in interfering with consumers’ risk perception. With a stratified random approach, we collected survey data from 375 consumers in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China. Based on these data, this study attempted to analyze the anchoring effect in consumers’ risk perception of foodborne diseases (FBDs) and the differences in their perception before and after intervention in a contrast experiment using the anchoring index and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results confirm the existence of the proposed anchoring effect. Moreover, the experimenter-provided anchor value, a history of FBD, and familiarity with FBD were found to be important factors influencing this anchoring effect. Therefore, improving consumers’ risk perception of FBD is critical to the long-term prevention of FBD risks by the government and consumers. The government should strengthen active monitoring, publicity, and education about FBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)
Open AccessArticle
Good Practices in Home Kitchens: Construction and Validation of an Instrument for Household Food-Borne Disease Assessment and Prevention
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061005 - 20 Mar 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1312
Abstract
This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument to evaluate Brazilian home kitchens’ good practices. We elaborated on the preliminary version of the check-list based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216), Collegiate Board Resolution 275 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument to evaluate Brazilian home kitchens’ good practices. We elaborated on the preliminary version of the check-list based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216), Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275), the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000) and Codex Alimentarius. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of food contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimum of five out of seven of agreement among the experts (W-values ≥ 0.7). Moreover, items should have a mean ≥3 for the evaluation of importance (content validation) and clarity (semantic evaluation) to be maintained in the instrument. After the expert phase, we conducted another semantic evaluation of the check-list with a focus group composed of 13 undergraduate students, one moderator, and one observer of the process, to evaluate each item regarding its clarity, considering their level of understanding of the item. The final version of the check-list was composed of 77 items, divided into four blocks. The check-list developed was validated with respect to content with a W-value of 0.86 and approved in the semantic evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Systematic Review of Beef Meat Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Models
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030688 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1381
Abstract
Each year in Europe, meat is associated with 2.3 million foodborne illnesses, with a high contribution from beef meat. Many of these illnesses are attributed to pathogenic bacterial contamination and inadequate operations leading to growth and/or insufficient inactivation occurring along the whole farm-to-fork [...] Read more.
Each year in Europe, meat is associated with 2.3 million foodborne illnesses, with a high contribution from beef meat. Many of these illnesses are attributed to pathogenic bacterial contamination and inadequate operations leading to growth and/or insufficient inactivation occurring along the whole farm-to-fork chain. To ensure consumer health, decision-making processes in food safety rely on Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) with many applications in recent decades. The present study aims to conduct a critical analysis of beef QMRAs and to identify future challenges. A systematic approach, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, was used to collate beef QMRA models, identify steps of the farm-to-fork chain considered, and analyze inputs and outputs included as well as modelling methods. A total of 2343 articles were collected and 67 were selected. These studies focused mainly on western countries and considered Escherichia coli (EHEC) and Salmonella spp. pathogens. Future challenges were identified and included the need of whole-chain assessments, centralization of data collection processes, and improvement of model interoperability through harmonization. The present analysis can serve as a source of data and information to inform QMRA framework for beef meat and will help the scientific community and food safety authorities to identify specific monitoring and research needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)
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Open AccessReview
Prevention and Control of Foodborne Diseases in Middle-East North African Countries: Review of National Control Systems
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010070 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1452
Abstract
Foodborne diseases continue to be a global public health problem with an estimated 600 million people falling ill annually. In return, international standards are becoming stricter which poses challenges to food trade. In light of the increasing burden of foodborne diseases, many countries [...] Read more.
Foodborne diseases continue to be a global public health problem with an estimated 600 million people falling ill annually. In return, international standards are becoming stricter which poses challenges to food trade. In light of the increasing burden of foodborne diseases, many countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region have upgraded their food laws and undertaken changes to the organizational structure of their regulatory institutions to maintain or expand international export activities, tighten control on local and imported products, and protect consumers’ health. However, until this date, the published information on the regional health burdens of foodborne diseases is very limited and it is not clear whether the recent changes will serve towards science-based and effective preventive functions and the adoption of the risk management approach. In this review, we summarize the recent food safety issues and the national food control systems of selected countries in the region although we were challenged with the scarcity of information. To this end, we examined the national food safety systems in the context of the five essential elements of the FAO/WHO Guidelines for Strengthening National Food Control Systems. These five elements—food law and regulations; food control management; inspection services; laboratory services; food monitoring; and epidemiological data, information, education, communication, and training—constitute the building blocks of a national food control system, but could also serve as tools to assess the effectiveness of the systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment)
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