ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Exclusive Papers Collection of Editorial Board Members in Section "Occupational Safety and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 67582

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce this Collection titled “Exclusive Papers Collection of Editorial Board Members in Section “Occupational Safety and Health””. This issue will be a collection of papers from our Section Editorial Board Members and researchers invited by the Editorial Board Members. The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between IJERPH and scholars in the field of occupational safety and health. All papers will be published with fully open access after peer review.

Prof. Dr. Nicola Magnavita
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human health and occupational risk assessment
  • management of occupational risks
  • prevention and control of work-related disease
  • occupational health surveillance
  • occupational health promotion
  • occupational toxicology
  • experimental studies on cellular and animal models
  • epidemiological studies in occupationally exposed subjects
  • emerging technologies
  • workplace environmental monitoring
  • occupational biological monitoring
  • mechanisms of occupational exposure epigenetics
  • occupational medicine diagnostics
  • occupational psychology
  • occupational ergonomics

Published Papers (22 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

10 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Occupational Carcinogenic Risk by Comparing Data from the Italian Register of Occupational Exposures to Carcinogens (SIREP) with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Evidence
by Lorena Paris, Alberto Scarselli, Alessandro Marinaccio and Stefania Massari
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(10), 5850; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20105850 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 1410
Abstract
In Italy, the National Register on Occupational Exposure to Carcinogens (SIREP) is established pursuant to article 243 of Legislative Decree 81/2008 and is aimed to collect information on the exposure of workers to carcinogens transmitted by employers. The aim of this study is [...] Read more.
In Italy, the National Register on Occupational Exposure to Carcinogens (SIREP) is established pursuant to article 243 of Legislative Decree 81/2008 and is aimed to collect information on the exposure of workers to carcinogens transmitted by employers. The aim of this study is to assess its level of implementation comparing prevailing carcinogens reported in SIREP with the monitoring of risks in the workplace evidenced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The data reported in the SIREP have been integrated with IARC and the database on carcinogenic risk in the workplace named MATline in order to build a matrix containing the carcinogens classified according to the IARC (Group 1 and 2A agents) and to a semi-quantitative indicator of risk level (High or Low) calculated upon the number of exposures reported in SIREP. The matrix contains the following data: carcinogens, economic sector (NACE Rev2 coding) and cancer sites. The comparison between SIREP and IARC evidence allowed us to highlight situations with a high risk of carcinogenicity and to address appropriate actions of prevention to contain the risks of exposure to carcinogenic substances. Full article
12 pages, 919 KiB  
Article
Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde Exposure in “Non-Traditional” Occupational Sectors: Bakeries and Pastry Producers
by Lucia Miligi, Sara Piro, Chiara Airoldi, Renato Di Rico, Raffaella Ricci, Rudy Ivan Paredes Alpaca, Fabrizio De Pasquale, Angela Veraldi, Alessandra Ranucci, Stefania Massari, Alessandro Marinaccio, Giorgia Stoppa, Anna Cenni, Cinzia Trane, Antonio Peruzzi and Maria Cristina Aprea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1983; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031983 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2204
Abstract
Introduction. Formaldehyde, a colorless and highly irritating substance, causes cancer of the nasopharynx and leukemia. Furthermore, it is one of the environmental mutagens to which humans are most abundantly exposed. Acetaldehyde was recently classified as carcinogen class 1B and mutagen class 2 in [...] Read more.
Introduction. Formaldehyde, a colorless and highly irritating substance, causes cancer of the nasopharynx and leukemia. Furthermore, it is one of the environmental mutagens to which humans are most abundantly exposed. Acetaldehyde was recently classified as carcinogen class 1B and mutagen class 2 in Annex VI EC regulation. Occupational exposure to the two aldehydes occurs in a wide variety of occupations and industries. The aim of this study is to deepen exposure to the two aldehydes in the non-traditional productive sectors of bakeries and pastry producers. Methods. The evaluation of exposure to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was conducted in Italy in 2019, in specific tasks and positions of 11 bakeries and pastry producers (115 measures, of which 57.4% were in fixed positions and the rest were personal air sampling). The measurements were performed using Radiello© radial diffusion samplers. A logarithmic transformation of the data was performed, and the correlation between the two substances was calculated. Moreover, linear models considering the log-formaldehyde as the outcome and adjusting for log-acetaldehyde values were used. Results. The study identified high levels of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde exposure in the monitored workplaces. Higher mean values were observed in the leavening phase (8.39 µg/m3 and 3.39 µg/m3 for log-transformed data acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, respectively). The adjusted univariate analyses show statistically significant factors for formaldehyde as the presence of yeast, the presence of type 1 flour, the use of barley, the use of fats, the type of production, the use of spelt, and the presence of type 0 flour. Conclusions. The measurements confirmed the release of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in bakeries and pastry industries, especially in some phases of the work process, such as leavening. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1665 KiB  
Article
Characterising Psycho-Physiological Responses and Relationships during a Military Field Training Exercise
by Sean Bulmer, Sean L. Corrigan, Jace R. Drain, Jamie L. Tait, Brad Aisbett, Spencer Roberts, Paul B. Gastin and Luana C. Main
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14767; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214767 - 10 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1805
Abstract
Over a 15-day period, that included an eight-day field trial, the aims of this study were to (1) quantify the physical workload, sleep and subjective well-being of soldiers in training; (2a) Explore relationships between workload and well-being, and (2b) sleep and well-being; (3) [...] Read more.
Over a 15-day period, that included an eight-day field trial, the aims of this study were to (1) quantify the physical workload, sleep and subjective well-being of soldiers in training; (2a) Explore relationships between workload and well-being, and (2b) sleep and well-being; (3) Explore relationships between workload, sleep, and well-being. Methods: Sixty-two Combat Engineer trainees (59 male, 3 female; age: 25.2 ± 7.2 years) wore an ActiGraph GT9X to monitor daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and sleep. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE), sleep quality, and fatigue were measured daily, subjective well-being was reported days 1, 5, 9, 13 and 15. Multi-level models were used for the analysis. Results: Well-being was affected by a combination of variables including workload, subjective sleep quality, sleep duration, and sleep efficiency. RPE and subjective sleep quality were consistently significant parameters within the models of best fit. Conclusions: Perceptions of well-being were lower during the field training when physical workload increased, and sleep decreased. Energy expenditure was comparatively low, while daily sleep duration was consistent with field training literature. Subjective assessments of workload and sleep quality were consistently effective in explaining variations in well-being and represent an efficient approach to monitor training status of personnel. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

39 pages, 3568 KiB  
Article
Measuring Safety Culture Using an Integrative Approach: The Development of a Comprehensive Conceptual Framework and an Applied Safety Culture Assessment Instrument
by Karolien van Nunen, Genserik Reniers and Koen Ponnet
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013602 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3584
Abstract
An exponential amount of academic research has been dedicated to the safety culture concept, but still, no consensus has been reached on its definition and content. In general, safety culture research lacks an interdisciplinary approach. Furthermore, although the concept of safety culture is [...] Read more.
An exponential amount of academic research has been dedicated to the safety culture concept, but still, no consensus has been reached on its definition and content. In general, safety culture research lacks an interdisciplinary approach. Furthermore, although the concept of safety culture is characterised by complexity and multifacetedness, the safety culture concept has been characterised by reductionism, where models and theories simplify the concept in order to better grasp it, leading to confined approaches. In this article, the multifacetedness of safety culture is acknowledged, and the topic is addressed from a safety science perspective, combining insights from multiple academic disciplines. An integrative and comprehensive conceptual framework to assess safety culture in organisations is developed, taking into account the limitations of existing models, as well as the needs of the work field. This conceptual framework is called the ‘Integrated Safety Culture Assessment’ (ISCA), where the ‘assessment’ refers to its practical usability. The practical rendition of ISCA can be used to map the safety culture of an organisation and to formulate recommendations in this regard, with the ultimate goal of bringing about a change towards a positive safety culture. The comprehensiveness of ISCA lies in the inclusion of technological factors, organisational or contextual factors and human factors interacting and interrelating with each other, and in considering both observable or objective safety-related aspects in an organisation, and non-observable or subjective safety-related aspects. When using ISCA, organisational safety culture is assessed in an integrative way by using a variety of research methods involving the entire organisation, and by taking into account the specific context of the organisation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1390 KiB  
Article
Accuracy of Computer-Aided Detection of Occupational Lung Disease: Silicosis and Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Ex-Miners from the South African Gold Mines
by Rodney Ehrlich, Stephen Barker, Jim te Water Naude, David Rees, Barry Kistnasamy, Julian Naidoo and Annalee Yassi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912402 - 29 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2153
Abstract
Background: Computer-aided detection (CAD) of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and silicosis among ex-miners from the South African gold mines has the potential to ease the backlog of lung examinations in clinical screening and medical adjudication for miners’ compensation. This study aimed to determine whether [...] Read more.
Background: Computer-aided detection (CAD) of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and silicosis among ex-miners from the South African gold mines has the potential to ease the backlog of lung examinations in clinical screening and medical adjudication for miners’ compensation. This study aimed to determine whether CAD systems developed to date primarily for TB were able to identify TB (without distinction between prior and active disease) and silicosis (or “other abnormality”) in this population. Methods: A total of 501 chest X-rays (CXRs) from a screening programme were submitted to two commercial CAD systems for detection of “any abnormality”, TB (any) and silicosis. The outcomes were tested against the readings of occupational medicine specialists with experience in reading miners’ CXRs. Accuracy of CAD against the readers was calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Sensitivity and specificity were derived using a threshold requiring at least 90% sensitivity. Results: One system was able to detect silicosis and/or TB with high AUCs (>0.85) against both readers, and specificity > 70% in most of the comparisons. The other system was able to detect “any abnormality” and TB with high AUCs, but with specificity < 70%. Conclusion: CAD systems have the potential to come close to expert readers in the identification of TB and silicosis in this population. The findings underscore the need for CAD systems to be developed and validated in specific use-case settings. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 321 KiB  
Article
Difference in Mortality Rates by Occupation in Japanese Male Workers Aged 25 to 64 Years from 1980 to 2015
by Bibha Dhungel, Tomoe Murakami, Koji Wada, Shunya Ikeda and Stuart Gilmour
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11328; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811328 - 9 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1526
Abstract
This study examines the trends in mortality among Japanese working men, across various occupational categories, from 1980 to 2015. A Poisson model of trend, occupational category, and step variable was analysed for eight occupational categories separately, by cause, to explore the trends in [...] Read more.
This study examines the trends in mortality among Japanese working men, across various occupational categories, from 1980 to 2015. A Poisson model of trend, occupational category, and step variable was analysed for eight occupational categories separately, by cause, to explore the trends in mortality. This study found a sharp increase in mortality in the late 1990s, especially among professionals and managers. The overall trends in cancer, ischemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), and suicide mortality decreased across almost all occupational categories from 1980 to 2015, although there was an increasing trend in cancer of 0.5% among managers. Clerical workers had the greatest relative decrease in mortality rates from cancer (−82.9%), IHD (−81.7%), and CVD (−89.1%). Japan continues to make gains in lowering mortality and extending life expectancy, but its workplace culture must improve to ensure that those working at the heart of the Japanese corporate world can also benefit from Japan’s progress in health. Mortality rates in working-aged Japanese men have been declining. However, similar declines are not evident among managers, for whom the mortality rate is remaining stable or slightly increasing. There is a need to address the needs of managers and improve workplace environments for these workers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 359 KiB  
Article
The Survey Measure of Psychological Safety and Its Association with Mental Health and Job Performance: A Validation Study and Cross-Sectional Analysis
by Natsu Sasaki, Akiomi Inoue, Hiroki Asaoka, Yuki Sekiya, Daisuke Nishi, Akizumi Tsutsumi and Kotaro Imamura
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 9879; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19169879 - 11 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3513
Abstract
Objectives: This study validated the Japanese version of O’Donovan et al.’s (2020) composite measure of the psychological safety scale and examined the associations of psychological safety with mental health and job-related outcomes. Methods: Online surveys were administered twice to Japanese employees in teams [...] Read more.
Objectives: This study validated the Japanese version of O’Donovan et al.’s (2020) composite measure of the psychological safety scale and examined the associations of psychological safety with mental health and job-related outcomes. Methods: Online surveys were administered twice to Japanese employees in teams of more than three members. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were tested using Cronbach’s α and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Structural validity was examined using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Convergent validity was tested using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between psychological safety and psychological distress, work engagement, job performance, and job satisfaction. Results: Two hundred healthcare workers and 200 non-healthcare workers were analyzed. Internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and convergent validity were acceptable. CFA demonstrated poor fit, and EFA yielded a two-factor structure, with team leader as one factor and peers and team forming the second factor. The total score showed significant and expected associations with all outcomes in the adjusted model for all workers. Conclusions: The Japanese version of the measure of the psychological safety scale presented good reliability and validity. Psychological safety is important for employees’ mental health and performance. Full article
13 pages, 1252 KiB  
Article
The Evolution of Effort-Reward Imbalance in Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic in France—An Observational Study in More than 8000 Workers
by Louis Delamarre, Salma Tannous, Ines Lakbar, Sébastien Couarraze, Bruno Pereira, Marc Leone, Fouad Marhar, Julien S. Baker, Reza Bagheri, Mickael Berton, Hana Rabbouch, Marek Zak, Tomasz Sikorski, Magdalena Wasik, Hijrah Nasir, Binh Quach, Jiao Jiao, Raimundo Aviles, COVISTRESS Network, Maëlys Clinchamps and Fréderic Dutheiladd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9113; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159113 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2946
Abstract
(1) Background: The effects of lockdown repetition on work-related stress, expressed through Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI), during the COVID-19 pandemic are poorly documented. We investigated the effect of repetitive lockdowns on the ERI in French workers, its difference across occupations, and the change in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The effects of lockdown repetition on work-related stress, expressed through Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI), during the COVID-19 pandemic are poorly documented. We investigated the effect of repetitive lockdowns on the ERI in French workers, its difference across occupations, and the change in its influencing factors across time. (2) Methods: Participants were included in a prospective cross-sectional observational study from 30 March 2020 to 28 May 2021. The primary outcome was the ERI score (visual analog scale). The ERI score of the population was examined via Generalized Estimating Equations. For each period, the factors influencing ERI were studied by multivariate linear regression. (3) Results: In 8121 participants, the ERI score decreased in the first 2 lockdowns (53.2 ± 0.3, p < 0.001; 50.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.001) and after lockdown 2 (54.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.004) compared with the pre-pandemic period (59 ± 0.4). ERI was higher in medical than in paramedical professionals in the pre-pandemic and the first 2 lockdowns. Higher workloads were associated with better ERI scores. (4) Conclusions: In a large French sample, Effort-Reward Imbalance worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic until the end of the 2nd lockdown. Paramedical professionals experienced a higher burden of stress compared with medical professionals. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1980 KiB  
Article
Workers’ Perception Heat Stress: Results from a Pilot Study Conducted in Italy during the COVID-19 Pandemic in 2020
by Michela Bonafede, Miriam Levi, Emma Pietrafesa, Alessandra Binazzi, Alessandro Marinaccio, Marco Morabito, Iole Pinto, Francesca de’ Donato, Valentina Grasso, Tiziano Costantini and Alessandro Messeri
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 8196; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138196 - 4 Jul 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3479
Abstract
Many workers are exposed to the effects of heat and often to extreme temperatures. Heat stress has been further aggravated during the COVID-19 pandemic by the use of personal protective equipment to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, workers’ risk perception of heat stress is [...] Read more.
Many workers are exposed to the effects of heat and often to extreme temperatures. Heat stress has been further aggravated during the COVID-19 pandemic by the use of personal protective equipment to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, workers’ risk perception of heat stress is often low, with negative effects on their health and productivity. The study aims to identify workers’ needs and gaps in knowledge, suggesting the adaptation of measures that best comply with the needs of both workers and employers. A cross-sectional online questionnaire survey was conducted in Italy in the hottest months of 2020 (June–October) through different multimedia channels. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics; analytical tests and analysis of variance were used to evaluate differences between groups of workers. In total, 345 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The whole sample of respondents declared that heat is an important contributor to productivity loss and 83% of workers did not receive heat warnings from their employer. In this context, the internet is considered as the main source of information about heat-related illness in the workplace. Results highlight the need to increase workers’ perception of heat stress in the workplace to safeguard their health and productivity. About two-thirds of the sample stated that working in the sun without access to shaded areas, working indoors without adequate ventilation, and nearby fire, steam, and hot surfaces, represent the main injuries’ risk factors. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

19 pages, 613 KiB  
Article
Validation of the MAastricht Instrument of Sustainable Employability (MAISE-NL) Adapted for Employees in Low-Skilled Jobs (MAISE-Easy)
by Pauline Mignon, Emmelie Hazelzet, Angelique De Rijk, Hans Bosma and Inge Houkes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7977; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137977 - 29 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1774
Abstract
Background: Sustainable employability (SE) is important for work organizations. Recently, the MAastricht Instrument for Sustainable Employability (MAISE-NL) was developed and validated. This study describes the development and validation of an adapted version of the MAISE-NL, the MAISE-Easy, which can be used for [...] Read more.
Background: Sustainable employability (SE) is important for work organizations. Recently, the MAastricht Instrument for Sustainable Employability (MAISE-NL) was developed and validated. This study describes the development and validation of an adapted version of the MAISE-NL, the MAISE-Easy, which can be used for employees in low-skilled jobs. Methods: The adaptation of the MAISE-NL was based on six focus groups with employees in low-skilled jobs in various sectors. The MAISE-Easy was distributed among employees in five organizations. The response rate (n = 1033) was 53%. Construct validity, reliability and criterion validity were analyzed by means of principal component analysis (PCA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach’s alpha and correlational analyses. Results: The MAISE-Easy included 17 scales divided over four main areas: (1) level of SE; (2) factors affecting SE; (3) overall responsibility for SE; (4) responsibility for factors affecting SE. Construct validity, reliability and criterion validity were adequate to good. Conclusions: The MAISE-Easy is a well-validated instrument for measuring SE among employees in low-skilled jobs in terms of the level of SE, factors affecting SE, responsibility for SE and responsibility for factors affecting SE. MAISE-Easy is recommended for both needs assessments and evaluation research in as yet underserved groups of low-skilled workers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 655 KiB  
Article
Pesticide Exposure in Relation to the Incidence of Abnormal Glucose Regulation: A Retrospective Cohort Study
by Sung-Kyung Kim, Hyun-Jung Oh, Sung-Soo Oh and Sang-Baek Koh
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7550; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127550 - 20 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2614
Abstract
Diabetes and prediabetes (called abnormal glucose regulation (AGR)) are adverse health effects associated with exposure to pesticides. However, there are few epidemiological studies on the relationship between pesticide use and the incidence of AGR. We examined the causal relationship between pesticide use and [...] Read more.
Diabetes and prediabetes (called abnormal glucose regulation (AGR)) are adverse health effects associated with exposure to pesticides. However, there are few epidemiological studies on the relationship between pesticide use and the incidence of AGR. We examined the causal relationship between pesticide use and AGR incidence in a rural population using data from a Korean Farmers’ Cohort study of 1076 participants. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to calculate the relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to estimate the relationship between pesticide exposure and AGR. The incidence of AGR in the pesticide-exposed group was 29.1%. Pesticide use increased the RR of AGR (RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.03–1.69). We observed a low-dose effect related to exposure of pesticides to AGR and a U-shaped dose–response relationship in men. Pesticide exposure is related to the incidence of AGR, and the causal relationship differs between men and women. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1357 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Thai Burley Tobacco Farmers
by Amarin Kongtawelert, Bryan Buchholz, Dusit Sujitrarath, Wisanti Laohaudomchok, Pornpimol Kongtip and Susan Woskie
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6779; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116779 - 1 Jun 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3015
Abstract
This cross-sectional analysis study aimed to identify the prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Thai Burley tobacco farmers. Subjects included 603 burley tobacco farmers from Sukhothai province. Farmers were interviewed twice, (during planting and harvesting seasons), with a questionnaire consisting [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional analysis study aimed to identify the prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Thai Burley tobacco farmers. Subjects included 603 burley tobacco farmers from Sukhothai province. Farmers were interviewed twice, (during planting and harvesting seasons), with a questionnaire consisting of demographic and health characteristics, musculoskeletal symptoms, and ergonomic exposure questions. The subjects average age was 49.5 years, more were female (58.5%), most had only a primary education (74.3%), 38% were overweight or obese. Farmers had a significantly higher prevalence of MSDs in the lower back (37.1%), knee (28.7%), shoulder (22.9%), wrist (19.9%), and hip (8.3%) during the harvesting season than in the planting season (p < 0.05). Models found that factors influencing MSDs prevalence during planting included long work hours in seedling, tasks such as topping tobacco plants, and using machine tools, after controlling for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). While in the harvesting season, models found tasks conducted as a group had lower MSDs prevalence than individual work when carrying fresh tobacco to the barn, piercing/threading and curing the leaves, baling the bundles, and transporting the finished goods. We recommended working in groups to reduce workload and MSDs, especially during harvesting, in burley tobacco farming. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 312 KiB  
Article
The Relationship of Medical Assistants’ Work Engagement with Their Concerns of Having Made an Important Medical Error: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Adrian Loerbroks, Patricia Vu-Eickmann, Annegret Dreher, Viola Mambrey, Jessica Scharf and Peter Angerer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6690; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116690 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1885
Abstract
Objectives: We aimed to examine associations of work engagement with self-reported concerns of having made medical errors among medical assistants. Methods: We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from 424 medical assistants in Germany (collected between March and May 2021). The nine-item Utrecht Work Engagement [...] Read more.
Objectives: We aimed to examine associations of work engagement with self-reported concerns of having made medical errors among medical assistants. Methods: We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from 424 medical assistants in Germany (collected between March and May 2021). The nine-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale assessed the subdimensions vigor, dedication, and absorption. Participants further reported whether they were concerned that they had made an important medical error in the last three months. Work engagement scores were used both as categorized variables (i.e., highest tertile vs. remaining tertiles) and continuous variables (i.e., z-scores) and their associations with concerns to have made an important medical error were examined using multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: High vigor (versus low vigor) and high dedication (versus low dedication) were associated with substantially reduced odds of expressing concerns to have made an important medical error (OR = 0.19, 95%CI = 0.04–0.85 and OR = 0.25, 95%CI = 0.07–0.88, respectively), but absorption was not (OR = 1.10, 95%CI = 0.43–2.86). Analyses with z-scores confirmed this pattern of associations for vigor and absorption, but less so for dedication (OR = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.47–1.11). Conclusions: Vigor and possibly also dedication are inversely related to concerns of having made an important medical error. Our findings may suggest that promotion of these subdimensions of work engagement may improve patient safety. Full article
10 pages, 637 KiB  
Article
Mortality for Lung Cancer among PVC Baggers Employed in the Vinyl Chloride Industry
by Paolo Girardi, Fabiano Barbiero, Michela Baccini, Pietro Comba, Roberta Pirastu, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Maria Nicoletta Ballarin, Annibale Biggeri and Ugo Fedeli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106246 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2820
Abstract
Vinyl-chloride monomer (VCM) is classified as a known carcinogen of the liver; for lung cancer, some results suggest a potential association with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) dust. We evaluated the relationship between lung cancer mortality and exposure as PVC baggers in a cohort of [...] Read more.
Vinyl-chloride monomer (VCM) is classified as a known carcinogen of the liver; for lung cancer, some results suggest a potential association with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) dust. We evaluated the relationship between lung cancer mortality and exposure as PVC baggers in a cohort of workers involved in VCM production and polymerization in Porto Marghera (Venice, Italy) considering both employment status and smoking habits. The workers were studied between 1973 and 2017. A subset of them (848 over 1658) was interviewed in the 2000s to collect information about smoking habits and alcohol consumption. Missing values were imputed by the Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equations (MICE) algorithm. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using regional reference rates by task (never, ever, and exclusively baggers) and by smoking habits. Mortality rate ratios (MRR), adjusted for age, calendar time, time since first exposure, and smoking habits, were obtained via Poisson regression using Rubin’s rule to combine results from imputed datasets calculating the fraction of information due to non-response. Lung cancer mortality was lower than the regional reference in the whole cohort (lung cancer SMR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.75–1.11). PVC baggers showed a 50% increase in lung cancer mortality compared to regional rates (SMR = 1.48; 95% CI 0.82–2.68). In the cohort analyses, a doubled risk of lung cancer mortality among PVC baggers was confirmed after adjustment for smoking and time-dependent covariates (MRR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.04–3.81). Exposure to PVC dust resulting from activity as bagger in a polymerization PVC plant was associated with an increase in lung cancer mortality risk after adjustment for smoking habits. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1512 KiB  
Article
Risk of Burnout among Emergency Department Staff as a Result of Violence and Aggression from Patients and Their Relatives
by Anja Schablon, Jan Felix Kersten, Albert Nienhaus, Hans Werner Kottkamp, Wilfried Schnieder, Greta Ullrich, Karin Schäfer, Lisa Ritzenhöfer, Claudia Peters and Tanja Wirth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 4945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19094945 - 19 Apr 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3647
Abstract
Emergency department staff are often affected by incidents of violence. The aim of the study was to generate data on the frequency of violence by patients and accompanying relatives and the correlation between experienced aggression, a possible risk of burnout and a high [...] Read more.
Emergency department staff are often affected by incidents of violence. The aim of the study was to generate data on the frequency of violence by patients and accompanying relatives and the correlation between experienced aggression, a possible risk of burnout and a high sense of stress. Additionally, the buffering effect of good preventive preparation of care staff by the facility on aggressive visitors and patients was examined. In this cross-sectional study, members of the German Society for Interdisciplinary Emergency and Acute Medicine were surveyed. The investigation of risk factors, particularly experiences of verbal and physical violence, as well as exhaustion and stress, was carried out using ordinal regression models. A total of 349 staff from German emergency departments took part in the survey, 87% of whom had experienced physical violence by patients and 64% by relatives. 97% had been confronted with verbal violence by patients and 94% by relatives. Violence by relatives had a negative effect on perceived stress. High resilience or effective preparation of employees for potential attacks was shown to have a protective effect with regard to the burnout risk and perceived stress. Therefore, management staff play a major role in preventing violence and its impact on employees. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 344 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown on the Nutritional Status and Lipid Profile of Employees in a Teaching Hospital in Rome: A Retrospective Cohort Study
by Lorenza Lia, Eleonora Ricci, Corrado Colaprico, Eleonora Di Legge, Augusto Faticoni, Lorenzo Maria Donini and Giuseppe La Torre
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4549; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084549 - 9 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1954
Abstract
Background: on the 9 March 2020, the Italian government declared a state of lockdown on the entire national territory aimed at reducing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, causing strong repercussions for people’s lifestyles. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of [...] Read more.
Background: on the 9 March 2020, the Italian government declared a state of lockdown on the entire national territory aimed at reducing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, causing strong repercussions for people’s lifestyles. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of the lockdown on the nutritional status and lipid profile of employees of an Italian teaching hospital. Methods: an observational retrospective cohort study was carried out at the Department of Occupational Medicine of the Umberto I General Hospital of Rome, including all employees who underwent two consecutive occupational medical examinations before and after the first lockdown (9 March 2020–18 May 2020). Employee medical records were used as a data source. Results: 1014 employees were involved in the study (50.6% nurses, 31% physicians, 14.8% technical staff, 3.6% administrative staff). Post lockdown BMI, total cholesterol and LDL values increased statistically significantly compared to pre lockdown ones. Nurses showed a significant association with increased BMI (p < 0.001), while workers with heart disease were inversely associated with total cholesterol (p < 0.001) and LDL (p < 0.001). Conclusion: this study showed that lockdown had a significant impact on employees’ lifestyles. Further studies are needed to understand changes in health-related behaviors, such as diet and physical activity, of specific categories of workers over time under lockdown conditions. Full article
14 pages, 2133 KiB  
Article
Rasch-Validated Italian Scale for Diagnosing Digital Eye Strain: The Computer Vision Syndrome Questionnaire IT©
by Natalia Cantó-Sancho, Elena Ronda, Julio Cabrero-García, Stefano Casati, Angela Carta, Stefano Porru and Mar Seguí-Crespo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084506 - 8 Apr 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3150
Abstract
The use of digital devices affects eye health; this can influence the performance of workers. To assess this impact, validated patient-reported outcome questionnaires are needed. The purpose of this study was to validate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Computer [...] Read more.
The use of digital devices affects eye health; this can influence the performance of workers. To assess this impact, validated patient-reported outcome questionnaires are needed. The purpose of this study was to validate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Computer Vision Syndrome Questionnaire (CVS-Q©) using Rasch analysis. Two hundred and forty-one Italian workers completed an ad hoc questionnaire on anamnesis and exposure to digital devices, and the Italian version of the CVS-Q©. Subsequently, a battery involving three clinical ocular surface and tear tests was performed. The reliability and validity of the scale was assessed using the Andrich Rating Scale Model, and the prevalence of computer vision syndrome (CVS) was calculated. A good fit of both items and persons to the predictions of the Rasch model was observed, with acceptable reliability, unidimensionality, and no or minimal severe differences as a function of gender or age; moreover, good test–retest repeatability, adequate values of sensitivity, reliability, and area under the curve, and adequate construct validity based on clinical tests were obtained. Workers with a questionnaire score ≥ 7 were found to present with CVS. The prevalence of CVS was 76.6%. The CVS-Q IT© is a valid and reliable scale to assess CVS in Italian workers who use digital devices. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 610 KiB  
Article
Stress Management Intervention for Leaders Increases Nighttime SDANN: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial
by Elisabeth Maria Balint, Peter Angerer, Harald Guendel, Birgitt Marten-Mittag and Marc N. Jarczok
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 3841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19073841 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2385
Abstract
Stress management interventions aim to reduce the disease risk that is heightened by work stress. Possible pathways of risk reduction include improvements in the autonomous nervous system, which is indexed by the measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). A randomized controlled trial on [...] Read more.
Stress management interventions aim to reduce the disease risk that is heightened by work stress. Possible pathways of risk reduction include improvements in the autonomous nervous system, which is indexed by the measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). A randomized controlled trial on improving stress management skills at work was conducted to investigate the effects of intervention on HRV. A total of 174 lower management employees were randomized into either the waiting list control group (CG) or the intervention group (IG) receiving a 2-day stress management training program and another half-day booster after four and six months. In the trial, 24 h HRV was measured at baseline and after 12 months. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), and standard deviation of the average of normal-to-normal intervals (SDANN) were calculated for 24 h and nighttime periods. Age-adjusted multilevel mixed effects linear regressions with unstructured covariance, time as a random coefficient, and time × group interaction with the according likelihood-ratio tests were calculated. The linear mixed-effect regression models showed neither group effects between IG and CG at baseline nor time effects between baseline and follow-up for SDANN (24 h), SDNN (24 h and nighttime), RMSSD (24 h and nighttime), and HR (24 h and nighttime). Nighttime SDANN significantly improved in the intervention group (z = 2.04, p = 0.041) compared to the control group. The objective stress axis measures (SDANN) showed successful stress reduction due to the training. Nighttime SDANN was strongly associated with minimum HR. Though the effects were small and only visible at night, it is highly remarkable that 3 days of intervention achieved a measurable effect considering that stress is only one of many factors that can influence HR and HRV. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 351 KiB  
Article
Patient Safety and Staff Well-Being: Organizational Culture as a Resource
by Luo Lu, Yi-Ming Ko, Hsing-Yu Chen, Jui-Wen Chueh, Po-Ying Chen and Cary L. Cooper
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3722; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063722 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 7350
Abstract
The present study examines the relationship between patient safety culture and health workers’ well-being. Applying the conservation of resources mechanism, we tested theory-based hypotheses in a large cross-disciplinary sample (N = 3232) from a Taiwanese metropolitan healthcare system. Using the structural equation modeling [...] Read more.
The present study examines the relationship between patient safety culture and health workers’ well-being. Applying the conservation of resources mechanism, we tested theory-based hypotheses in a large cross-disciplinary sample (N = 3232) from a Taiwanese metropolitan healthcare system. Using the structural equation modeling technique, we found that patient safety culture was negatively related to staff burnout (β = −0.74) and could explain 55% of the total variance. We also found that patient safety culture was positively related to staff work–life balance (β = 0.44) and could explain 19% of the total variance. Furthermore, the above relationships were invariant across groups of diverse staff demography (gender, age, managerial position, and incident reporting) and job characteristics (job role, tenure, and patient contact). Our findings suggest that investing in patient safety culture can be viewed as building an organizational resource, which is beneficial for both improving the care quality and protecting staff well-being. More importantly, the benefits are the same for everyone in the healthcare services. Full article
16 pages, 1052 KiB  
Article
Sickness Presenteeism as a Link between Long Working Hours and Employees’ Outcomes: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivators as Resources
by Luo Lu and Cary L. Cooper
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2179; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042179 - 15 Feb 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3492
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the flow from long working hours to sickness presenteeism behavior and its outcomes for employees, while integrating intrinsic and extrinsic work value orientations as moderators in the process. We employed a two-wave design with a [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to test the flow from long working hours to sickness presenteeism behavior and its outcomes for employees, while integrating intrinsic and extrinsic work value orientations as moderators in the process. We employed a two-wave design with a five-month interval. Data were obtained from 275 employees in Taiwan. The results of latent moderated structural equations (LMS) revealed that long working hours were positively associated with presenteeism, which in turn was negatively related to employees’ well-being and job performance. Furthermore, the negative indirect effect of working long hours on job performance via presenteeism was weaker for those with a higher intrinsic work value orientation. The negative indirect effect of working long hours on well-being via presenteeism was weaker for those with a higher extrinsic work value orientation. We demonstrated that the long-term impact of presenteeism behavior could be understood by viewing work value orientations as resource gains to compensate resource depletion in a demanding work context. This resource dynamism is pivotal to realizing the functional or dysfunctional outcomes of presenteeism behavior. Theoretical and managerial implications of the findings for employees’ well-being and organizational effectiveness are discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 544 KiB  
Article
Association of Occupational Distress and Low Sleep Quality with Syncope, Presyncope, and Falls in Workers
by Nicola Magnavita, Reparata Rosa Di Prinzio, Gabriele Arnesano, Anna Cerrina, Maddalena Gabriele, Sergio Garbarino, Martina Gasbarri, Angela Iuliano, Marcella Labella, Carmela Matera, Igor Mauro and Franca Barbic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12283; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312283 - 23 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4171
Abstract
Syncope and presyncope episodes that occur during work could affect one’s safety and impair occupational performance. Few data are available regarding the prevalence of these events among workers. The possible role of sleep quality, mental stress, and metabolic disorders in promoting syncope, presyncope, [...] Read more.
Syncope and presyncope episodes that occur during work could affect one’s safety and impair occupational performance. Few data are available regarding the prevalence of these events among workers. The possible role of sleep quality, mental stress, and metabolic disorders in promoting syncope, presyncope, and falls in workers is unknown. In the present study, 741 workers (male 35.4%; mean age 47 ± 11 years), employed at different companies, underwent clinical evaluation and blood tests, and completed questionnaires to assess sleep quality, occupational distress, and mental disorders. The occurrence of syncope, presyncope, and unexplained falls during working life was assessed via an ad hoc interview. The prevalence of syncope, presyncope, and falls of unknown origin was 13.9%, 27.0%, and 10.3%, respectively. The occurrence of syncope was associated with an increased risk of occupational distress (adjusted odds ratio aOR: 1.62, confidence intervals at 95%: 1.05–2.52), low sleep quality (aOR: 1.79 CI 95%: 1.16–2.77), and poor mental health (aOR: 2.43 CI 95%: 1.52–3.87). Presyncope was strongly associated with occupational distress (aOR: 1.77 CI 95%: 1.25–2.49), low sleep quality (aOR: 2.95 CI 95%: 2.08–4.18), and poor mental health (aOR: 2.61 CI 95%: 1.78–3.84), while no significant relationship was found between syncope or presyncope and metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that occupational health promotion interventions aimed at improving sleep quality, reducing stressors, and increasing worker resilience might reduce syncope and presyncope events in the working population. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

22 pages, 2671 KiB  
Systematic Review
Myopia and Near Work: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Frédéric Dutheil, Tharwa Oueslati, Louis Delamarre, Joris Castanon, Caroline Maurin, Frédéric Chiambaretta, Julien S. Baker, Ukadike C. Ugbolue, Marek Zak, Ines Lakbar, Bruno Pereira and Valentin Navel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 875; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010875 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5166
Abstract
Background: Myopia is a global public health problem affecting quality of life and work productivity. Data is scarce regarding the effects of near work on myopia. Providing a larger meta-analysis with life-long perspective, including adults and occupational exposure seemed needed. Methods: We searched [...] Read more.
Background: Myopia is a global public health problem affecting quality of life and work productivity. Data is scarce regarding the effects of near work on myopia. Providing a larger meta-analysis with life-long perspective, including adults and occupational exposure seemed needed. Methods: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase and Science Direct for studies reporting myopia prevalence in near work. Myopia was defined as a mean spherical equivalent ≤ −0.50 diopter. We performed a meta-analysis using random-effects model on myopia prevalence, myopia progression per year, and odds ratio (OR) of myopia in near work, completed by subgroup analyses and meta-regressions on patients’ characteristics, type of work in adults, geographic zones, time and characteristics of near work. Results: We included 78 studies, representing a total of 254,037 participants, aged from 6 to 39 years. The global prevalence of myopia in near work was 35% (95% CI: 30 to 41%), with a prevalence of 31% (95% CI: 26 to 37%) in children and 46% (95% CI: 30 to 62%) in adults. Myopia progression was −0.39 diopters per year (−0.53 to −0.24 D/year), ranging from −0.44 (−0.57 to −0.31) in children to −0.25 D/year (−0.56 to 0.06) in adults. The odds of myopia in workers exposed vs. non-exposed to near work were increased by 26% (18 to 34%), by 31% (21 to 42%) in children and 21% (6 to 35%) in adults. Prevalence of myopia was higher in adults compared to children (Coefficient 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.27). Conclusions: Near work conditions, including occupational exposure in adults, could be associated with myopia. Targeted prevention should be implemented in the workplace. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop