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Article

Patient Safety and Staff Well-Being: Organizational Culture as a Resource

1
Department of Business Administration, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taipei City Hospital and Musoon Women’s and Children’s Clinic, Taipei 106, Taiwan
3
Medical Quality Management Center, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 106, Taiwan
4
Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester M15 6PB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nicola Magnavita
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3722; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063722
Received: 23 February 2022 / Revised: 18 March 2022 / Accepted: 19 March 2022 / Published: 21 March 2022
The present study examines the relationship between patient safety culture and health workers’ well-being. Applying the conservation of resources mechanism, we tested theory-based hypotheses in a large cross-disciplinary sample (N = 3232) from a Taiwanese metropolitan healthcare system. Using the structural equation modeling technique, we found that patient safety culture was negatively related to staff burnout (β = −0.74) and could explain 55% of the total variance. We also found that patient safety culture was positively related to staff work–life balance (β = 0.44) and could explain 19% of the total variance. Furthermore, the above relationships were invariant across groups of diverse staff demography (gender, age, managerial position, and incident reporting) and job characteristics (job role, tenure, and patient contact). Our findings suggest that investing in patient safety culture can be viewed as building an organizational resource, which is beneficial for both improving the care quality and protecting staff well-being. More importantly, the benefits are the same for everyone in the healthcare services. View Full-Text
Keywords: patient safety culture; staff burnout; work–life balance; conservation of resources patient safety culture; staff burnout; work–life balance; conservation of resources
MDPI and ACS Style

Lu, L.; Ko, Y.-M.; Chen, H.-Y.; Chueh, J.-W.; Chen, P.-Y.; Cooper, C.L. Patient Safety and Staff Well-Being: Organizational Culture as a Resource. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 3722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063722

AMA Style

Lu L, Ko Y-M, Chen H-Y, Chueh J-W, Chen P-Y, Cooper CL. Patient Safety and Staff Well-Being: Organizational Culture as a Resource. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(6):3722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lu, Luo, Yi-Ming Ko, Hsing-Yu Chen, Jui-Wen Chueh, Po-Ying Chen, and Cary L. Cooper. 2022. "Patient Safety and Staff Well-Being: Organizational Culture as a Resource" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 6: 3722. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063722

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