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Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 14958

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal/Child Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: neurophysiology of sleep; stress-sleep relationship; psychopathology; mental health; suicide
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Via Giuseppe Verdi, 8, 10124 Torino TO, Italy
Interests: work related stress; violence in workplace; prevention in workplace; intervention in workplace; work and organizational well-being
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Life Sciences and Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
2. Department of Women, Children and Public Health Sciences, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: personalized occupational health; management of hazardous workers; psychosocial factors; methods of prevention; workplace health promotion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There may be several psychosocial risk factors in the workplace. Most are related to the interactions between work typology, organizational environment and management, skills and abilities of workers and the support provided to carry out the work.

As highlighted by the World Health Organization, mental health hazards include inadequate health and safety policies, inadequate communication and management practices, low levels of worker support, limited employee participation in decision-making, tight schedules, unclear tasks. There are also risk factors related to the content of the work, such as a high workload or excessive rhythms.
Such conditions affect the health and the perception of well-being of the worker, can be cause burnout and the use of maladaptive coping strategies that in the long term determine a worsening of the health on the individual (for example psychoactive drugs). The coping strategies, if adaptive (the aim of such strategies is to obtain social and family support, by sharing the experience with others), could be a protective factor; otherwise, if they are maladaptive (e.g., using self-destructive lifestyle, such as cigarette or alcohol misuse), they could contribute to increase the stress or make it chronic, and could determine burnout. Some conditions of addiction may result in suicidal ideation. Moreover, these lifestyle changes, affecting health status, can determine the onset of lifestyle chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, tumors). The social and organisational environment may also be affected, for example bullying and harassment are symptoms of work-related stress. From the organizational point of view, the consequences represent a cost in terms of increased absenteeism and reduced productivity.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect contributions that describe research on the issue of perception of well-being, work-related stress, and suicide risk in workers. Also welcome are contributions that describe interventions to implement the promotion and protection of health, safety and well-being of all employees.

Dr. Sergio Garbarino
Dr. Daniela Maran
Dr. Nicola Magnavita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coping strategies
  • prevention
  • intervention
  • health promotion
  • occupational health
  • organizational
  • psychology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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10 pages, 664 KiB  
Article
Happiness Detected by the Emotion Cognition System Is Associated with Burnout in an Information Technology Products and Services Trading Company
by Yasumasa Otsuka, Yukiko Sagisaka, Junko Nakamura, Keiko Hara, Masaki Okada, Yuko Takeuchi, Mizuki Tsuchiya and Yutaka Monden
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2212; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032212 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1429
Abstract
(1) Background: Although many previous studies have found an association between burnout and emotions, none have examined the association between emotions detected by an emotion cognition system and burnout. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the emotions detected [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Although many previous studies have found an association between burnout and emotions, none have examined the association between emotions detected by an emotion cognition system and burnout. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the emotions detected by the emotion cognition system and burnout among workers. We hypothesized that burnout survivors are less likely to express their emotions as facial expressions. (2) Methods: One hundred and forty-one workers at an Information Technology (IT) products and services trading company were asked to take facial images for three months when they started and left work and responded to a burnout questionnaire once a month. Microsoft Azure was used to detect their emotions. (3) Results: Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that happiness in Period 1 was significantly and negatively associated with burnout at Time 2. This association was also observed after the various covariates were included. However, burnout at Time 3 was not significantly related to any emotions in Period 1. (4) Conclusions: Happiness, as detected by the emotion cognition system, was associated with burnout immediately afterward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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16 pages, 487 KiB  
Article
A New Gain Spiral at Work: Relationships between Virtuous Organizational Practices, Psychological Capital, and Well-Being of Workers
by Julia Aubouin-Bonnaventure, Evelyne Fouquereau, Hélène Coillot, Fadi-Joseph Lahiani and Séverine Chevalier
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1823; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031823 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2223
Abstract
Identifying antecedents of well-being at work is an active field of research, focusing notably on organizational practices that promote employees’ optimal health. To date, whereas studies have demonstrated that some organizational practices, considered in isolation, are positively associated with indicators of well-being, none [...] Read more.
Identifying antecedents of well-being at work is an active field of research, focusing notably on organizational practices that promote employees’ optimal health. To date, whereas studies have demonstrated that some organizational practices, considered in isolation, are positively associated with indicators of well-being, none tested the joint effect of a bundle of practices on these. Moreover, few studies have examined the psychological mechanisms underlying these relationships. The present study aimed to identify the relationships between virtuous organizational practices, a new psychological integrative construct, and three indicators of workers’ hedonic, eudaimonic, and social well-being, namely job satisfaction, thriving at work, and work–life balance, and to test the mediational role of psychological capital in these relationships. The sample comprised 400 French employees working in non-profit, private, and public organizations. Structural equation modeling confirmed the direct effects of virtuous organizational practices on the three indicators of well-being, and a bootstrapping procedure demonstrated that psychological capital partially mediates these relationships. The results of this study have many practical applications because virtuous organizational practices can easily be implemented and optimized in work organizations to develop the individual resources of workers and, in detail, to promote their psychological well-being. Finally, the contributions of this study, avenues for future research, and limitations are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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11 pages, 861 KiB  
Article
Moderated Role of Social Support in the Relationship between Job Strain, Burnout, and Organizational Commitment among Operating Room Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Na Li, Lichuan Zhang, Xuejing Li and Qian Lu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710813 - 30 Aug 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2248
Abstract
Unique environment, coupled with overload, low job control, and high risk might put operating room (OR) nurses in a state of high job strain, which might have negative influences on burnout and organizational commitment. Based on the Job Demand-Control-Support model and previous studies, [...] Read more.
Unique environment, coupled with overload, low job control, and high risk might put operating room (OR) nurses in a state of high job strain, which might have negative influences on burnout and organizational commitment. Based on the Job Demand-Control-Support model and previous studies, we hypothesized that the relationship between job strain (determined by job demand and control) and organizational commitment could be mediated by burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization), the effect of job strain on burnout and organizational commitment could be moderated by social support. To verify the hypothesis, a quantitative cross-sectional survey was conducted, 509 OR nurses from 30 tertiary hospitals in Beijing were recruited. Multiple-group path analysis was used to test the moderated role of social support. Propensity score matching was applied to match job strain in different groups. Our research found that in the low social support group, job strain was not related to organizational commitment, while in the high social support group, depersonalization was not related to organizational commitment. Furthermore, nurses in the low social support group were more likely to have depersonalization under job strain compared to the high social support group. Social support should be provided to alleviate the negative impact of job strain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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18 pages, 597 KiB  
Article
Study on the Effect of Employees’ Perceived Organizational Support, Psychological Ownership, and Turnover Intention: A Case of China’s Employee
by Jianwan Jing and Jinzhe Yan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6016; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106016 - 15 May 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3636
Abstract
In the context of severe turnover, taking measures to enhance core employee management, prevent the turnover of talents, and improve employees’ sense of belonging and responsibility to the firm can become a non-negligible problem in human resource management. Considering Chinese enterprises as the [...] Read more.
In the context of severe turnover, taking measures to enhance core employee management, prevent the turnover of talents, and improve employees’ sense of belonging and responsibility to the firm can become a non-negligible problem in human resource management. Considering Chinese enterprises as the research background, this study starts with the related theories of organizational support, psychological ownership, and turnover intention to explore the impact of organizational support on psychological ownership and its dimensions (self-efficacy, taking responsibility, a sense of belonging, and self-identification), the effect of each dimension of psychological ownership on turnover intention, and the relationship between organizational support and turnover intention, as well as verifies the mediating role of psychological ownership. The main findings show that (1) perceived organizational support positively affects psychological ownership; (2) psychological ownership negatively affects turnover intention; (3) perceived organizational support negatively influences turnover intention; and (4) psychological ownership mediates the relationship between perceived organizational support and turnover intention. The study results contribute to the relevant literature and guide human resource practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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10 pages, 564 KiB  
Article
Suicide Trends in the Italian State Police during the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic: A Comparison with the Pre-Pandemic Period
by Silvana Maselli, Antonio del Casale, Elena Paoli, Maurizio Pompili and Sergio Garbarino
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5904; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105904 - 12 May 2022
Viewed by 1721
Abstract
The pandemic is posing an occupational stressor for law enforcement personnel. Therefore, a high priority is the need to quantify this phenomenon and put supportive programs in place. During the pandemic period, the Italian State Police implemented different support programs for the personnel. [...] Read more.
The pandemic is posing an occupational stressor for law enforcement personnel. Therefore, a high priority is the need to quantify this phenomenon and put supportive programs in place. During the pandemic period, the Italian State Police implemented different support programs for the personnel. These included a national toll-free number to provide information on COVID-19 to police staff, availability of a health care service by doctors and nurses at the national level, vaccination services, working remotely, and a psychological intervention protocol called “Together we can” (“Insieme Possiamo”). Our study firstly aims to perform a descriptive analysis of the suicide in the Italian police from 2016 to 2021, and secondly aims to compare the pandemic and pre-pandemic periods. During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (February 2020 to October 2021), the suicide rate in the State Police did not significantly increase compared to the pre-pandemic period, showing a stable trend with a not significant decrease in the suicide rate. The implementation of staff support services by the Central Directorate of Health of the Italian State Police and individual resilience aspects of the Police personnel in response to the pandemic may have positively affected the phenomenon. These aspects pave the way to further studies on the issue to improve preventive strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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7 pages, 1294 KiB  
Opinion
Caring for Those Who Take Care of Others: Developing Systemic and Sustainable Mental Health Support for the Diverse Healthcare Workforce in the United Kingdom
by Irtiza Qureshi, Jonathan Chaloner, Mayuri Gogoi, Amani Al-Oraibi, Fatimah Wobi, Holly Reilly, Asta Medisauskaite, Christopher A. Martin, Patricia Irizar, Padmasayee Papineni, Susie Lagrata, Joy Agbonmwandolor, Manish Pareek and Laura Nellums
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3242; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043242 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2166
Abstract
Pressures such as high workload, stretched resources, and financial stress are resulting in healthcare workers experiencing high rates of mental health conditions, high suicide rates, high rates of staff absences from work, and high vacancy rates for certain healthcare professions. All of these [...] Read more.
Pressures such as high workload, stretched resources, and financial stress are resulting in healthcare workers experiencing high rates of mental health conditions, high suicide rates, high rates of staff absences from work, and high vacancy rates for certain healthcare professions. All of these factors point to the fact that a systematic and sustainable approach to mental health support at different levels and in different ways is more important than ever. In response, we present a holistic analysis of the mental health and wellbeing needs of healthcare workers across the United Kingdom healthcare ecosystem. We recommend that healthcare organisations should consider the specific circumstances of these staff and develop strategies to counter the negative impact of these factors and help safeguard the mental health of their staff. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work and Organisational Well-Being: Stress, Burnout and Suicidal Risk)
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