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Article

Association of Occupational Distress and Low Sleep Quality with Syncope, Presyncope, and Falls in Workers

1
Postgraduate School of Occupational Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
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Department of Woman, Child & Public Health Sciences, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Rome, Italy
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Local Sanitary Unit Roma4, 00053 Civitavecchia, Italy
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Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal-Infantile Sciences (DINOGMI), 16132 Genoa, Italy
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Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, 20072 Pieve Emanuele, Italy
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Internal Medicine, IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, 20089 Rozzano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12283; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312283
Received: 22 October 2021 / Revised: 18 November 2021 / Accepted: 20 November 2021 / Published: 23 November 2021
Syncope and presyncope episodes that occur during work could affect one’s safety and impair occupational performance. Few data are available regarding the prevalence of these events among workers. The possible role of sleep quality, mental stress, and metabolic disorders in promoting syncope, presyncope, and falls in workers is unknown. In the present study, 741 workers (male 35.4%; mean age 47 ± 11 years), employed at different companies, underwent clinical evaluation and blood tests, and completed questionnaires to assess sleep quality, occupational distress, and mental disorders. The occurrence of syncope, presyncope, and unexplained falls during working life was assessed via an ad hoc interview. The prevalence of syncope, presyncope, and falls of unknown origin was 13.9%, 27.0%, and 10.3%, respectively. The occurrence of syncope was associated with an increased risk of occupational distress (adjusted odds ratio aOR: 1.62, confidence intervals at 95%: 1.05–2.52), low sleep quality (aOR: 1.79 CI 95%: 1.16–2.77), and poor mental health (aOR: 2.43 CI 95%: 1.52–3.87). Presyncope was strongly associated with occupational distress (aOR: 1.77 CI 95%: 1.25–2.49), low sleep quality (aOR: 2.95 CI 95%: 2.08–4.18), and poor mental health (aOR: 2.61 CI 95%: 1.78–3.84), while no significant relationship was found between syncope or presyncope and metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that occupational health promotion interventions aimed at improving sleep quality, reducing stressors, and increasing worker resilience might reduce syncope and presyncope events in the working population. View Full-Text
Keywords: loss of consciousness; mental health; working life; effort reward imbalance; sleep dis-orders; health promotion; workplace loss of consciousness; mental health; working life; effort reward imbalance; sleep dis-orders; health promotion; workplace
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MDPI and ACS Style

Magnavita, N.; Di Prinzio, R.R.; Arnesano, G.; Cerrina, A.; Gabriele, M.; Garbarino, S.; Gasbarri, M.; Iuliano, A.; Labella, M.; Matera, C.; Mauro, I.; Barbic, F. Association of Occupational Distress and Low Sleep Quality with Syncope, Presyncope, and Falls in Workers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 12283. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312283

AMA Style

Magnavita N, Di Prinzio RR, Arnesano G, Cerrina A, Gabriele M, Garbarino S, Gasbarri M, Iuliano A, Labella M, Matera C, Mauro I, Barbic F. Association of Occupational Distress and Low Sleep Quality with Syncope, Presyncope, and Falls in Workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(23):12283. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312283

Chicago/Turabian Style

Magnavita, Nicola, Reparata R. Di Prinzio, Gabriele Arnesano, Anna Cerrina, Maddalena Gabriele, Sergio Garbarino, Martina Gasbarri, Angela Iuliano, Marcella Labella, Carmela Matera, Igor Mauro, and Franca Barbic. 2021. "Association of Occupational Distress and Low Sleep Quality with Syncope, Presyncope, and Falls in Workers" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 23: 12283. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312283

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