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Special Issue "Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Huixiao Hong

National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration , 3900 NCTR Road, Building 5, Room 5C-109A, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA
E-Mail
Interests: pharmacogenomics; personalized medicine; toxicogenomics; bioinformatics; predictive toxicology
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jingwen Chen

Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Environmental Science and Technology (http://est.dlut.edu.cn/), Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Dalian 116024, P. R. China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: predictive toxicology; ecotoxicology; environmental sciences; computational toxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are exogenous compounds that act like hormones in the endocrine system and disrupt the physiologic function of endogenous hormones. EDs could either mimic the endogenous hormones causing over-responding or block the effects of a hormone from certain receptors, and, therefore, resulting in adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological and immune system effects. Increasing evidence suggests that some EDs are able to interrupt some hormonally regulated metabolic processes, leading to obesity and related complications, which pose a great human health concern worldwide.

This Special Issue aims to provide a forum to collect most recent progresses in all aspects of EDs and their impacts on the development of obesity and related co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Articles of the scientific findings on health effects, biomarkers and mechanisms of action of EDs leading to obesity/overweight and derived diseases, as well as on the epidemiology of the latter are solicited.

Dr. Huixiao Hong
Prof. Dr. Jingwen Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • endocrine disruptors
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • metabolic processes
  • disease
  • hormones

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Trypsin Binding with Copper Ions Scavenges Superoxide: Molecular Dynamics-Based Mechanism Investigation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010139
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 27 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8098 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Trypsin is a serine protease, which has been proved to be a novel superoxide scavenger. The burst of superoxide induced by polychlorinated biphenyls can be impeded by trypsin in both wild type and sod knockout mutants of Escherichia coli. The experimental results [...] Read more.
Trypsin is a serine protease, which has been proved to be a novel superoxide scavenger. The burst of superoxide induced by polychlorinated biphenyls can be impeded by trypsin in both wild type and sod knockout mutants of Escherichia coli. The experimental results demonstrated that the activities of superoxide scavenging of trypsin were significantly accelerated by Cu ions. Also, with the addition of Cu ions, a new β-sheet (β7) transited from a random coil in the Cu(II)-trypsin (TP) system, which was favorable for the formation of more contacts with other sheets of trypsin. Residue–residue network analysis and the porcupine plots proved that the Cu ion in trypsin strengthened some native interactions among residues, which ultimately resulted in much greater stability of the Cu(II)-TP system. Moreover, compact and stable trypsin structures with Cu ions might be responsible for significantly provoking the activity of superoxide scavenging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Endocrine Disruptors and Pregnancy: Knowledge, Attitudes and Prevention Behaviors of French Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091021
Received: 27 July 2017 / Revised: 26 August 2017 / Accepted: 31 August 2017 / Published: 6 September 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1071 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are environmental exposure factors that are rarely reported in clinical practice, particularly during pregnancy. This study aimed to describe women’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviors towards EDC exposure. A study was conducted in the French Department of Vienne between 2014 [...] Read more.
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are environmental exposure factors that are rarely reported in clinical practice, particularly during pregnancy. This study aimed to describe women’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviors towards EDC exposure. A study was conducted in the French Department of Vienne between 2014 and 2016 and comprised semi-structured interviews with pregnant women, a focus group of professionals in perinatology and environmental health, and the administration of a psychosocial questionnaire comprising scores in 300 pregnant or in postpartum period women. The mean score of knowledge was 42.9 ± 9.8 out of 100 (from 13.5 to 75.7). Exposure attitude was determined by risk perception. Mean level of cues to action to reduce their EDC exposure was estimated at 56.9 ± 22.5 out of 100 (from 0 to 100). Anxiety was significantly increased after the questionnaire. Anxiety about EDC was associated with a high score of knowledge (OR = 2.30, 95% CI (1.12–4.71)) and with no pregnancy anxiety (OR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.34–0.95)). Our findings suggest that healthcare providers should consider pregnant women’s knowledge and perceptions, possibilities of action, and be careful not to increase their anxiety when advising them about EDC and environmental exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Mediated through Binding Androgen Receptor Are Associated with Diabetes Mellitus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010025
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 20 December 2017 / Published: 23 December 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1856 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can mimic natural hormone to interact with receptors in the endocrine system and thus disrupt the functions of the endocrine system, raising concerns on the public health. In addition to disruption of the endocrine system, some EDCs have been [...] Read more.
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can mimic natural hormone to interact with receptors in the endocrine system and thus disrupt the functions of the endocrine system, raising concerns on the public health. In addition to disruption of the endocrine system, some EDCs have been found associated with many diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, asthma, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. EDCs that binding androgen receptor have been reported associated with diabetes mellitus in in vitro, animal, and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the structural basis and interactions between androgen receptor and EDCs as well as the associations of various types of diabetes mellitus with the EDCs mediated through androgen receptor binding. We also discuss the perspective research for further understanding the impact and mechanisms of EDCs on the risk of diabetes mellitus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases)
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Open AccessReview
Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1282; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101282
Received: 12 August 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 19 October 2017 / Published: 24 October 2017
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (1020 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The review aims to comprehensively present the impact of exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs) in relation to the clinical manifestation of obesity and related diseases, including diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, carcinogenesis and infertility. EDs are strong participants in the obesity epidemic [...] Read more.
The review aims to comprehensively present the impact of exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs) in relation to the clinical manifestation of obesity and related diseases, including diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, carcinogenesis and infertility. EDs are strong participants in the obesity epidemic scenery by interfering with cellular morphological and biochemical processes; by inducing inflammatory responses; and by presenting transcriptional and oncogenic activity. Obesity and lipotoxicity enhancement occur through reprogramming and/or remodeling of germline epigenome by exposure to EDs. Specific population groups are vulnerable to ED exposure due to current dietary and environmental conditions. Obesity, morbidity and carcinogenicity induced by ED exposure are an evolving reality. Therefore, a new collective strategic approach is deemed essential, for the reappraisal of current global conditions pertaining to energy management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases)
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Open AccessReview
Bisphenol A and Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Occupational Medicine
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 959; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14090959
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 21 August 2017 / Accepted: 21 August 2017 / Published: 25 August 2017
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (530 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The prevalence of metabolic diseases has markedly increased worldwide during the last few decades. Lifestyle factors (physical activity, energy-dense diets), together with a genetic predisposition, are well known factors in the pathophysiology of health problems. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound used [...] Read more.
The prevalence of metabolic diseases has markedly increased worldwide during the last few decades. Lifestyle factors (physical activity, energy-dense diets), together with a genetic predisposition, are well known factors in the pathophysiology of health problems. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound used for polycarbonate plastics, food containers, epoxy resins coating metallic cans for food and beverage conservation. The ability of BPA to act as an endocrine disruptor—xenoestrogen in particular—is largely documented in literature, with numerous publications of in vivo and in vitro studies as well as epidemiological data on humans. Recently, different researchers studied the involvement of BPA in the development of insulin resistance; evidences in this way showed a potential role in etiology of metabolic disease, both for children and for adults. We review the epidemiological literature in the relation between BPA exposure and the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, with a focus on occupational exposure. Considering published data and the role of occupational physicians in promoting Workers’ Health, specific situations of exposure to BPA in workplace are described, and proposals for action to be taken are suggested. The comparison of the studies showed that exposure levels were higher in workers than in the general population, even if, sometimes, the measurement units used did not permit rapid comprehension. Nevertheless, occupational medicine focus on reproductive effects and not metabolic ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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