Special Issue "Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Gillian Bendelow
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Applied Social Science, Centre of Resilience for Social Justice, University of Brighton,Falmer, Brighton BN11PH, UK
Interests: mental illness and emotional health; chronic illness and pain; medically unexplained symptoms and ‘contested conditions’; health promotion and integrated models of health care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue to bring together interdisciplinary perspectives on emotional health and wellbeing across the wide range of health, life, and social sciences in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph

Since 1948, the WHO definition of health has advocated a holistic understanding of health and wellbeing and the concept of emotional health not only challenges the unhelpful divisions between mind and body, but encompasses mind, body, and society. Across disciplines, there is consensus that all higher mammals display sadness and distress under conditions of trauma, loss, and learned helplessness, and that for humans in particular, these phenomena are heavily shaped by language and social context. The suppression or repression of traumatic experiences leads to emotional distress, which in turn exacerbates our resilience to stress and our lack of wellbeing may lead to medically defined illness. In turn, holistic and integrated concepts of wellbeing may enable radical change in what is meant by health, illness, and disease, with our sights set much higher than simply the avoidance of illness.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to understanding the complexity of emotional health and wellbeing. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Gillian Bendelow
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emotional health and wellbeing concepts
  • Stress and distress
  • Medically unexplained symptoms
  • Trauma and trauma management
  • Resilience
  • Stress management and emotion work/education
  • Emotional wellbeing and physical health
  • Mind/body therapies and ‘talking cures’
  • Health capital and wellbeing
  • Holistic/integrated public health models and policies
  • Measuring and evidencing wellbeing

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Designing ‘Healthy’ Prisons for Women: Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care and Practice (TICP) into Prison Planning and Design
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3818; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203818 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
There has been growing acknowledgment among scholars, prison staff and policy-makers that gender-informed thinking should feed into penal policy but must be implemented holistically if gains are to be made in reducing trauma, saving lives, ensuring emotional wellbeing and promoting desistance from crime. [...] Read more.
There has been growing acknowledgment among scholars, prison staff and policy-makers that gender-informed thinking should feed into penal policy but must be implemented holistically if gains are to be made in reducing trauma, saving lives, ensuring emotional wellbeing and promoting desistance from crime. This means that not only healthcare services and psychology programmes must be sensitive to individuals’ trauma histories but that the architecture and design of prisons should also be sympathetic, facilitating and encouraging trauma-informed and trauma-sensitive practices within. This article problematises the Trauma-Informed Care and Practice (TICP) initiatives recently rolled out across the female prison estate, arguing that attempts to introduce trauma-sensitive services in establishments that are replete with hostile architecture, overt security paraphernalia, and dilapidated fixtures and fittings is futile. Using examples from healthcare and custodial settings, the article puts forward suggestions for prison commissioners, planners and architects which we believe will have novel implications for prison planning and penal practice in the UK and beyond. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
Didgeridoo Health Promotion Method Improves Mood, Mental Stress, and Stability of Autonomic Nervous System
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3443; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183443 - 17 Sep 2019
Abstract
A potential method of health promotion using the traditional wooden brass instrument the didgeridoo was examined, especially in terms of mood, stress, and autonomic nerve stabilization. Twenty Japanese healthy subjects undertook 10 lessons of the Didgeridoo Health Promotion Method (DHPM) and a moods [...] Read more.
A potential method of health promotion using the traditional wooden brass instrument the didgeridoo was examined, especially in terms of mood, stress, and autonomic nerve stabilization. Twenty Japanese healthy subjects undertook 10 lessons of the Didgeridoo Health Promotion Method (DHPM) and a moods questionnaire, blood pressure, salivary amylase (sAmy) as a stress marker, pulse rate and autonomic balance expressed by Ln[low frequency (LF)/High frequency (HF) were examined twice before the entire lessons and once before and after each lesson. The subjects had improved total mood disturbance (TMD: overall mood disorder degree) as measured by the Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States 2nd Edition (POMS2) as a result of taking the lessons. The pulse of the subjects decreased after the lessons, which correlated with a reduction in sAmy. Additionally, it was found that sAmy decreased after the lessons with increasing age of the subject, subjects with higher TMD before the lessons, or subjects with higher sAmy values before the lessons. With autonomic balance measured by Ln[LF/HF], subjects who had parasympathetic dominance as a result of the lesson were significantly more frequent. Additionally, it has been shown that Ln[LF/HF] decreased over 10 weeks, and it is also clear that the effect is sustained. Health promotion is an important concern for societies as a whole. In this study, it became clear that the DHPM affected mood, stress, and autonomic stability. Future studies should focus on monitoring the effects of continuing the lessons for a longer period of time. Additionally, physical effects such as strength of respiratory muscles should be examined. DHPM may be employed in the work place to promote the mental health of workers as well as in regional neighborhood associations/communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
Post-Traumatic Growth Following Exposure to Memorial Reports of the 5.12 Wenchuan Earthquake: The Moderating Roles of Self-Esteem and Long-Term PTSD Symptoms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3239; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183239 - 04 Sep 2019
Abstract
Media exposure during a traumatic event has been found to be associated with negative psychological consequences. However, the post-disaster role of the mass media and the possible positive psychological consequences of media exposure has received less attention. In the present study, we hypothesized [...] Read more.
Media exposure during a traumatic event has been found to be associated with negative psychological consequences. However, the post-disaster role of the mass media and the possible positive psychological consequences of media exposure has received less attention. In the present study, we hypothesized that exposure to memorial media reports would lead to improved post-traumatic growth (PTG). Further, we evaluated the moderating role of self-esteem and long-term post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in the relationship between media exposure and PTG. Using a cross-sectional design, we surveyed individuals (N = 1000, mean age = 45.62, 43.5% male) who were recruited from disaster-affected communities ten years after the 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake which was the largest country-level trauma in the past three decades. Results revealed that individuals with lower self-esteem or lower PTSD symptoms would have higher psychological growth with greater exposure to memorial news reports. For individuals who reported having both high levels of self-esteem and PTSD symptoms, the relationship between media exposure and PTG was negative. These findings help present trauma in a new light, particularly regarding the rapid and instantaneous new coverage of the digital age. This study also has multi-disciplinary, cross-cultural, and clinical implications for the fields of psychology, public health, and communications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
The Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies on Problematic Smartphone Use: Comparison between Problematic and Non-Problematic Adolescent Users
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173142 - 28 Aug 2019
Abstract
Prior work has suggested that individuals with deficits in emotion regulation skills are prone to compulsive behaviour and to following maladaptive coping strategies, such as smartphone overuse, to manage negative moods. Adolescence is a vulnerable developmental stage for deficits in emotion regulation, and [...] Read more.
Prior work has suggested that individuals with deficits in emotion regulation skills are prone to compulsive behaviour and to following maladaptive coping strategies, such as smartphone overuse, to manage negative moods. Adolescence is a vulnerable developmental stage for deficits in emotion regulation, and these are linked to excessive smartphone use. The present study is the first to examine the links between the use of specific cognitive emotion regulation (CER) strategies and problematic smartphone use in a sample of adolescents. A total of 845 Spanish adolescents (455 females) completed the Spanish versions of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and the Smartphone Addiction Scale, along with a socio-demographic survey. The adolescents were divided into two groups: Non-problematic smartphone users (n = 491, 58.1%) and problematic smartphone users (n = 354, 41.9%). Significant group differences were found, with the problematic users reporting significantly higher scores for all maladaptive CER strategies, including higher self-blame, rumination, blaming of others and catastrophising. The results from logistic regression analyses show that rumination, catastrophising and blaming of others were the most important variables for distinguishing between the two groups, along with gender and parental control outside the home. In summary, these findings suggest the importance of specific maladaptive CER strategies in problematic smartphone use and provide insight for relevant targets for intervention designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
Not Getting What You Want? The Impact of Income Comparisons on Subjective Well-Being—Findings of a Population-Based Longitudinal Study in Germany
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152655 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
Previous studies have mainly focused on interindividual income comparisons (e.g., comparisons with colleagues or neighbors), whereas intraindividual income comparisons (i.e., difference between factual income and expectations) have rarely been investigated in well-being research. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the [...] Read more.
Previous studies have mainly focused on interindividual income comparisons (e.g., comparisons with colleagues or neighbors), whereas intraindividual income comparisons (i.e., difference between factual income and expectations) have rarely been investigated in well-being research. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of intraindividual income comparisons on subjective well-being (negative/positive emotions and life satisfaction) longitudinally. Data from 2005 to 2013 (biannually) were used from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), a nationally representative, longitudinal study. Affective well-being (negative and positive emotions) were quantified by using the affective well-being scale-SOEP. Life satisfaction was quantified using the widely used one-item form. Intraindividual income comparisons were analyzed by using the distance between the own individual income and fair income (“how high would your net income have to be in order to be just”). We tested whether negative (i.e., factual income was lower than their self-rated just income) and positive income comparisons (otherwise) affect the outcome measures differently. Fixed effects regressions showed that positive emotions increased with positive income comparisons in the total sample (β = 0.16, p < 0.05). In contrast, negative income comparisons neither affect negative emotions nor satisfaction with life. Strategies to shift income expectations might be beneficial for increasing positive emotions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
Decreased Quality of Life in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Emotional Distress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2652; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152652 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
Background: individuals with type 2 diabetes show emotional distress as they learn how to cope with the disease. The emotional distress increases the possibility of complications in these patients. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the impact of the [...] Read more.
Background: individuals with type 2 diabetes show emotional distress as they learn how to cope with the disease. The emotional distress increases the possibility of complications in these patients. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the impact of the emotional distress in the quality of life of individuals with diabetes, and to investigate the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with the emotional distress of living with diabetes in a Mexican population. Methods: a total of 422 Mexican individuals with type 2 diabetes were recruited from the outpatient Diabetes Clinic of the Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad Dr. Gustavo A. Rovirosa of Villahermosa, Tabasco. Demographic and clinical characteristics along with quality of life (SF-36) were assessed in these individuals. The emotional distress of living with diabetes was measured using the 5-item Problem Areas in Diabetes. Patients were divided according to the presence of high or low distress. Results: we identified that 31.8% (n = 134) of patients presented high diabetes-related emotional distress. We observed that hepatic diseases as comorbidities (p = 0.008) and diagnosis of major depression (p = 0.04) are factors associated with the emotional distress of living with diabetes. These patients showed a reduced quality of life in all dimensions (p < 0.001); the most affected dimensions were physical role (d = 0.37) and general health (d = 0.89) showing lower scores in comparison with patients with low emotional distress. Conclusions: our results suggest that Mexican individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus show high emotional distress living with the disease and have a decreased quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to decrease factors associated with the high emotional distress of living with diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
Digital Leadership Skills and Associations with Psychological Well-Being
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2628; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142628 - 23 Jul 2019
Abstract
Due to increasing digitalisation, today’s working world is changing rapidly and provides managers with new challenges. Digital leadership is an important factor in managing these challenges and has become a key concept in the discussion about what kinds of skills managers need for [...] Read more.
Due to increasing digitalisation, today’s working world is changing rapidly and provides managers with new challenges. Digital leadership is an important factor in managing these challenges and has become a key concept in the discussion about what kinds of skills managers need for digital transformation. The main research question our study explored was if digital leadership is associated with psychological well-being in upper-level managers. Based on a qualitative pilot study and relevant literature, we developed a new scale for digital leadership in managers. We conducted an online survey with a sample of 368 upper-level managers from a large German ICT-company. Using a stepwise logistic regression analysis, potential effects of digital leadership on psychological well-being (WHO-5) were analysed. Logistic regression analyses showed that better skills in digital leadership were significantly associated with higher well-being. Results also showed that gender, age and managerial experience had no effect in our model. Our study provides a valuable insight into the association between digital leadership and well-being in managers. However, further research is necessary to validate the newly developed scale for digital leadership and to confirm a causal effect in the relationship between digital leadership and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
Absolute Income, Income Inequality and the Subjective Well-Being of Migrant Workers in China: Toward an Understanding of the Relationship and Its Psychological Mechanisms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2597; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142597 - 21 Jul 2019
Abstract
No study has been conducted linking Chinese migrants’ subjective well-being (SWB) with urban inequality. This paper presents the effects of income and inequality on their SWB using a total of 128,000 answers to a survey question about “happiness”. We find evidence for a [...] Read more.
No study has been conducted linking Chinese migrants’ subjective well-being (SWB) with urban inequality. This paper presents the effects of income and inequality on their SWB using a total of 128,000 answers to a survey question about “happiness”. We find evidence for a satiation point above which higher income is no longer associated with greater well-being. Income inequality is detrimental to well-being. Migrants report lower SWB levels where income inequality is higher, even after controlling for personal income, a large set of individual characteristics, and province dummies. We also find striking differences across socio-economic and geographic groups. The positive effect of income is more pronounced for rural and western migrants, and is shown to be significantly correlated with the poor’s SWB but not for the well-being of more affluent respondents. Interestingly, high-income earners are more hurt by income inequality than low-income respondents. Moreover, compared with migrants in other regions, those in less developed Western China are found to be more averse to income inequality. Our results are quite robust to different specifications. We provide novel explanations for these findings by delving into psychological channels, including egalitarian preferences, social comparison concerns, expectations, perceived fairness concerns and perceived social mobility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
Associations between Polypharmacy, Self-Rated Health, and Depression in African American Older Adults; Mediators and Moderators
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1574; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091574 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background. Despite the prevalence of multimorbidity among African American (AA) older adults, little information exists on correlates of polypharmacy (using 5+ medications) in AA older adults. There is more information available regarding the link between polypharmacy and physical aspects of health than [...] Read more.
Background. Despite the prevalence of multimorbidity among African American (AA) older adults, little information exists on correlates of polypharmacy (using 5+ medications) in AA older adults. There is more information available regarding the link between polypharmacy and physical aspects of health than subjective ones. Aims. In a local sample of AA older adults in Los Angeles, this study investigated the association of polypharmacy with self-rated health (SRH) and depression. We also explored gender differences in these links. Methods. This community-based study was conducted in south Los Angeles. A total number of 708 AA older adults (age ≥ 55 years) were entered into this study. From this number, 253 were AA men and 455 were AA women. Polypharmacy was the independent variable. Self-rated health (SRH) and depression were the dependent variables. Age, educational attainment, financial difficulty (difficulty paying bills, etc.), and marital status were covariates. Gender was the moderator. Multimorbidity, measured as the number of chronic diseases (CDs), was the mediator. Logistic regressions were applied for data analysis. Results. Polypharmacy was associated with worse SRH and depression. Multimorbidity fully mediated the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms. Multimorbidity only partially mediated the association between polypharmacy and poor SRH. Gender moderated the association between polypharmacy and SRH, as polypharmacy was associated with poor SRH in women but not men. Gender did not alter the association between polypharmacy and depression. Conclusions. AA older women with polypharmacy experience worse SRH and depression, an association which is partially due to the underlying multimorbidity. There is a need for preventing inappropriate polypharmacy in AA older adults, particularly when addressing poor SRH and depression in AA older women with multimorbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Social Support on the Stress-Health Relationship: Gender Comparison among Military Personnel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1317; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081317 - 12 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate how the role of workplace social support and gender affect the relationship between work stress and the physical and mental health of military personnel in Taiwan. The analysis results reveal that military personnel expressed significantly [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate how the role of workplace social support and gender affect the relationship between work stress and the physical and mental health of military personnel in Taiwan. The analysis results reveal that military personnel expressed significantly high perceptions of work-related stress. Social support from supervisors and colleagues is a crucial factor in buffering the effect of work-related stress on perceived health, and increasing the physical and mental health among military personnel. This study shows that male personnel who perceived higher stress and gained more social support from supervisors and colleagues than female personnel were less likely to have physical and mental issues than female personnel. Managerial implications and suggestions could serve as references in managing work-related stress, enhancing social support occurring in the military workplace, and reducing job dissatisfaction, which in turn improves the health and well-being of military personnel in Taiwan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
Differences in Eysenck’s Personality Dimensions between a Group of Breast Cancer Survivors and the General Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071240 - 08 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cancer may influence personality in patients and survivors. However, the possible relations between the treatments that the patients have undergone and the personality in survivors are not clear. This study aimed to establish the differences in personality between a group of breast cancer [...] Read more.
Cancer may influence personality in patients and survivors. However, the possible relations between the treatments that the patients have undergone and the personality in survivors are not clear. This study aimed to establish the differences in personality between a group of breast cancer survivors and a control group, and to test the predictive utility of the treatments on the personality traits in survivors. Thirty breast cancer survivors and thirty participants from the general population completed the Eysenck personality questionnaire-revised (EPQ-R) and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Survivors had lower scores on extraversion and higher scores on neuroticism than the control group, but these differences were not significant. However, differences in psychoticism were significant, with higher scores in the survivor group. Breast-conserving therapy predicted extraversion while breast reconstruction predicted psychoticism. These results suggest that the physical consequences of surgery may lead to social and psychological impairments in this group of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Open AccessArticle
PM2.5 Concentrations and Subjective Well-Being: Longitudinal Evidence from Aggregated Panel Data from Chinese Provinces
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1129; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071129 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Although haze pollution with PM2.5 as the chief pollutant has become a critical threat worldwide, little research has examined the effects of PM2.5 concentrations on subjective well-being. Based on a longitudinal aggregated panel dataset from Chinese provinces, this study investigates the [...] Read more.
Although haze pollution with PM2.5 as the chief pollutant has become a critical threat worldwide, little research has examined the effects of PM2.5 concentrations on subjective well-being. Based on a longitudinal aggregated panel dataset from Chinese provinces, this study investigates the effects of PM2.5 concentrations on levels of happiness and the inequality of happiness. The results showed that high ground-level PM2.5 concentrations decreased the average level of happiness and high PM2.5 concentrations had stronger negative effects on the happiness of persons with high income than those with low income. In addition, PM2.5 concentrations were also significantly negatively related to inequality of happiness in Chinese provinces. Further empirical tests showed that the negative effects of PM2.5 concentrations on the inequality of happiness could be explained by the stronger influence of PM2.5 concentrations on the subjective well-being of individuals with a higher initial level of happiness than those with a lower initial level of happiness. This confirms that PM2.5 pollution can do harm to subjective well-being and reduce variations in the subjective well-being of individuals. The policy implications of controlling haze pollution and improving well-being are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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Open AccessArticle
“We Are More than Our Parents’ Mental Illness”: Narratives from Adult Children
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050839 - 07 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Although research on children of parents with mental illness is growing, few researchers have examined the long-term impact of parental mental illness on adult children. This study explored the potential impact of growing up with a parent with a mental illness on the [...] Read more.
Although research on children of parents with mental illness is growing, few researchers have examined the long-term impact of parental mental illness on adult children. This study explored the potential impact of growing up with a parent with a mental illness on the parenting role assumed by adult children. The qualitative study included ten participants, who were individually interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) along with member checks were utilised to derive themes from participants’ narratives. Three main themes were identified, including: ‘this is me’, ‘a whole new world’, and ‘because of you’. ‘This is me’ consisted of narratives highlighting how adult children intentionally went about parenting in ways different from their parents, and ‘a whole new world’ captured the salient identity that parenthood served for adult children. The third theme, ‘because of you’ highlighted the challenges adult children faced in their parenting roles as a result of their childhood experience living with a parent with mental illness. Participants highlighted the main challenges to be an absence of a reference point and lack of informal social supports. Recommendations for mental health practitioners and future research are presented in order to develop better ways to support adult children and their families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
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