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Open AccessArticle

Differences in Eysenck’s Personality Dimensions between a Group of Breast Cancer Survivors and the General Population

1
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain
2
Maimonides Biomedical Research Institute of Cordoba, IMIBIC, 14004 Cordoba, Spain
3
Reina Sofía University Hospital, 14004 Cordoba, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071240
Received: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Cancer may influence personality in patients and survivors. However, the possible relations between the treatments that the patients have undergone and the personality in survivors are not clear. This study aimed to establish the differences in personality between a group of breast cancer survivors and a control group, and to test the predictive utility of the treatments on the personality traits in survivors. Thirty breast cancer survivors and thirty participants from the general population completed the Eysenck personality questionnaire-revised (EPQ-R) and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Survivors had lower scores on extraversion and higher scores on neuroticism than the control group, but these differences were not significant. However, differences in psychoticism were significant, with higher scores in the survivor group. Breast-conserving therapy predicted extraversion while breast reconstruction predicted psychoticism. These results suggest that the physical consequences of surgery may lead to social and psychological impairments in this group of patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: oncology; breast cancer; survivorship; personality; psychoticism oncology; breast cancer; survivorship; personality; psychoticism
MDPI and ACS Style

García-Torres, F.; Castillo-Mayén, R. Differences in Eysenck’s Personality Dimensions between a Group of Breast Cancer Survivors and the General Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1240.

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