Next Article in Journal
An Investigation of Soundscape Factors Influencing Perceptions of Square Dancing in Urban Streets: A Case Study in a County Level City in China
Next Article in Special Issue
PM2.5 Concentrations and Subjective Well-Being: Longitudinal Evidence from Aggregated Panel Data from Chinese Provinces
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Food Contamination on Gastrointestinal Morbidity: Comparison of Different Machine-Learning Methods
Open AccessArticle

“We Are More than Our Parents’ Mental Illness”: Narratives from Adult Children

Faculty of Education, 19 Ancora Imparo Way, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050839
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing)
Although research on children of parents with mental illness is growing, few researchers have examined the long-term impact of parental mental illness on adult children. This study explored the potential impact of growing up with a parent with a mental illness on the parenting role assumed by adult children. The qualitative study included ten participants, who were individually interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) along with member checks were utilised to derive themes from participants’ narratives. Three main themes were identified, including: ‘this is me’, ‘a whole new world’, and ‘because of you’. ‘This is me’ consisted of narratives highlighting how adult children intentionally went about parenting in ways different from their parents, and ‘a whole new world’ captured the salient identity that parenthood served for adult children. The third theme, ‘because of you’ highlighted the challenges adult children faced in their parenting roles as a result of their childhood experience living with a parent with mental illness. Participants highlighted the main challenges to be an absence of a reference point and lack of informal social supports. Recommendations for mental health practitioners and future research are presented in order to develop better ways to support adult children and their families. View Full-Text
Keywords: intergenerational relationships; parental mental illness; adult children; parenting; relationships; interpretative phenomenological analysis intergenerational relationships; parental mental illness; adult children; parenting; relationships; interpretative phenomenological analysis
MDPI and ACS Style

Patrick, P.M.; Reupert, A.E.; McLean, L.A. “We Are More than Our Parents’ Mental Illness”: Narratives from Adult Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 839.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop