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Special Issue "Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017) | Viewed by 43400

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Brooks C. Wingo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave. S, Birmingham, AL 35294-3361, USA
Prof. Dr. James H. Rimmer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave. S, Birmingham, AL 35294-3361, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Improving health and lifestyle behaviors of children and adults with disabilities is an important objective for public health, health care, and policy makers. Health promotion interventions range from interventions with individuals, families and caretakers, to addressing community access to healthy behaviors, and societal and policy-level interventions for ensuring accessibility of a healthy lifestyle for all citizens.

This Special Issue is open to any topic or subject area related to health promotion interventions for people with disabilities. We hope to gather submissions related to all ages and disability types, across a wide continuum of intervention modalities and target behaviors. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Brooks C. Wingo, PhD
James H. Rimmer, PhD
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical disability
  • Intellectual disability
  • Cognitive disability
  • Health behavior
  • Built environment
  • Telehealth
  • eHealth
  • Diet
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep
  • Smoking
  • Social participation
  • Leisure
  • Inclusion

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Emerging Trends in Health Promotion for People with Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040742 - 13 Apr 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
The need among people with disabilities to improve their own health and prevent/manage secondary conditions requires a better balance between reactive and anticipatory care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)

Research

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Article
Mobile Healthcare and People with Disabilities: Current State and Future Needs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030515 - 14 Mar 2018
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 5036
Abstract
Significant health disparities exist between the general population and people with disabilities, particularly with respect to chronic health conditions. Mobile healthcare—the delivery of healthcare via mobile communication devices—is witnessing tremendous growth and has been touted as an important new approach for management of [...] Read more.
Significant health disparities exist between the general population and people with disabilities, particularly with respect to chronic health conditions. Mobile healthcare—the delivery of healthcare via mobile communication devices—is witnessing tremendous growth and has been touted as an important new approach for management of chronic health conditions. At present, little is known about the current state of mobile healthcare for people with disabilities. Early evidence suggests they are not well represented in the growth of mobile healthcare, and particularly the proliferation of mobile health software applications (mHealth apps) for smartphones. Their omission in mHealth could lead to further health disparities. This article describes our research investigating the current state of mHealth apps targeting people with disabilities. Based on a multi-modal approach (literature review, Internet search, survey of disabled smartphone users), we confirm that people with disabilities are under-represented in the growth of mHealth. We identify several areas of future research and development needed to support the inclusion of people with disabilities in the mHealth revolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
Article
Reflections on Health Promotion and Disability in Low and Middle-Income Countries: Case Study of Parent-Support Programmes for Children with Congenital Zika Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030514 - 14 Mar 2018
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3719
Abstract
Universal health coverage (UHC) has been adopted by many countries as a national target for 2030. People with disabilities need to be included within efforts towards UHC, as they are a large group making up 15% of the world’s population and are more [...] Read more.
Universal health coverage (UHC) has been adopted by many countries as a national target for 2030. People with disabilities need to be included within efforts towards UHC, as they are a large group making up 15% of the world’s population and are more vulnerable to poor health. UHC focuses both on covering the whole population as well as providing all the services needed and must include an emphasis on health promotion, as well as disease treatment and cure. Health promotion often focusses on tackling individual behaviours, such as encouraging exercise or good nutrition. However, these activities are insufficient to improve health without additional efforts to address poverty and inequality, which are the underlying drivers of poor health. In this article, we identify common challenges, opportunities and examples for health promotion for people with disabilities, looking at both individual behaviour change as well as addressing the drivers of poor health. We present a case study of a carer support programme for parents of children with Congenital Zika Syndrome in Brazil as an example of a holistic programme for health promotion. This programme operates both through improving skills of caregivers to address the health needs of their child and tackling poverty and exclusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Communication
Changing the Paradigm in Public Health and Disability through a Knowledge Translation Center
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020328 - 13 Feb 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2395
Abstract
People with disabilities are a health disparity population that face many barriers to health promotion opportunities in their communities. Inclusion in public health initiatives is a critical approach to address the health disparities that people with disabilities experience. The National Center on Health, [...] Read more.
People with disabilities are a health disparity population that face many barriers to health promotion opportunities in their communities. Inclusion in public health initiatives is a critical approach to address the health disparities that people with disabilities experience. The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) is tackling health disparities in the areas of physical activity, healthy nutrition, and healthy weight management. Using the NCHPAD Knowledge Adaptation, Translation, and Scale-up Framework, NCHPAD is systematically facilitating, monitoring, and evaluating inclusive programmatic, policy, systems, and environmental (PPSE) changes in communities and organizations at a local and national level. Through examples we will highlight the importance of adapting knowledge, facilitating uptake, developing strategic partnerships and building community capacity that ultimately creates sustainable, inclusive change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Article
Use of a New International Classification of Health Interventions for Capturing Information on Health Interventions Relevant to People with Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010145 - 17 Jan 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2572
Abstract
Development of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Health Interventions (ICHI) is currently underway. Once finalised, ICHI will provide a standard basis for collecting, aggregating, analysing, and comparing data on health interventions across all sectors of the health system. In this paper, [...] Read more.
Development of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Health Interventions (ICHI) is currently underway. Once finalised, ICHI will provide a standard basis for collecting, aggregating, analysing, and comparing data on health interventions across all sectors of the health system. In this paper, we introduce the classification, describing its underlying tri-axial structure, organisation and content. We then discuss the potential value of ICHI for capturing information on met and unmet need for health interventions relevant to people with a disability, with a particular focus on interventions to support functioning and health promotion interventions. Early experiences of use of the Swedish National Classification of Social Care Interventions and Activities, which is based closely on ICHI, illustrate the value of a standard classification to support practice and collect statistical data. Testing of the ICHI beta version in a wide range of countries and contexts is now needed so that improvements can be made before it is finalised. Input from those with an interest in the health of people with disabilities and health promotion more broadly is welcomed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Article
Promoting Long-Term Health among People with Spinal Cord Injury: What’s New?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1520; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121520 - 06 Dec 2017
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3088
Abstract
A key ingredient to successful health promotion is a primary care provider who can offer an informed first response to lifestyle issues, emerging problems and chronic challenges. This article aims to assist family physicians to play their role in promoting the health of [...] Read more.
A key ingredient to successful health promotion is a primary care provider who can offer an informed first response to lifestyle issues, emerging problems and chronic challenges. This article aims to assist family physicians to play their role in promoting the health of people with SCI, by summarizing the latest evidence in the management of spinal cord injury in primary care. This study used a scoping review methodology to survey peer-reviewed journal articles and clinical guidelines published between January 2012 to June 2016. This search strategy identified 153 articles across 20 topics. A prevention framework is used to identify five primary, nine secondary, four tertiary, and two quaternary prevention issues about which family physicians require current information. Major changes in the management of SCI in primary care were noted for 8 of the 20 topics, specifically in the areas of pharmacological management of neuropathic pain and urinary tract infection; screening for bowel and bladder cancer; improvements in wound care; and clarification of dietary fibre recommendations. All of these changes are represented in the 3rd edition of Actionable Nuggets—an innovative tool to assist family physicians to be aware of the best practices in primary care for spinal cord injury. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
Article
Low Levels of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1503; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121503 - 04 Dec 2017
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 3771
Abstract
Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles and have low levels of physical activity (LLPA). The present study investigated the prevalence of reported LLPA and time spent watching TV in adults with ID and identified the associated factors [...] Read more.
Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles and have low levels of physical activity (LLPA). The present study investigated the prevalence of reported LLPA and time spent watching TV in adults with ID and identified the associated factors for these behaviors. The proxy informants of 1618 adults with ID completed the surveys regarding their health behaviors. Multiple logistic regressions were employed for LLPA and multiple linear regressions for time spent watching TV. About 60% of adults with ID had LLPA and average time spent watching TV was 3.4 h a day. Some characteristics and health and function variables were identified as associated factors. While engaging in community activities and involvement in Special Olympics were inversely associated with LLPA, they were not associated with time spent watching TV. Attending day/educational programs or being employed were associated with spending less time watching TV. Findings highlight differential factors associated with LLPA versus TV-watching behavior in adults with ID. Hence, a key strategy aimed at increasing physical activity includes promoting participation in social and community activities, while targeted activities for reducing sedentary behavior might focus on providing day programs or employment opportunities for adults with ID. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
Article
Sedentary and Physical Activity Patterns in Adults with Intellectual Disability
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091027 - 07 Sep 2017
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3488
Abstract
Little is known about the patterns of sedentary time (ST) and physical activity (PA) levels throughout the week among adults and older adults with Intellectual Disability (ID). We analyzed ST and PA patterns of adults and older adults with ID. Forty-two adults and [...] Read more.
Little is known about the patterns of sedentary time (ST) and physical activity (PA) levels throughout the week among adults and older adults with Intellectual Disability (ID). We analyzed ST and PA patterns of adults and older adults with ID. Forty-two adults and 42 older adults with mild to severe ID participated in this study. Height and weight were obtained to calculate Body Mass Index (BMI). Body fat and fat-free mass percentages were also obtained. Patterns of PA levels and ST were assessed with GT3X Actigraph accelerometers. Adults performed higher amounts of total PA and moderate to vigorous PA than older adults during the week, on weekdays and in center time (all p > 0.05). No differences between males and females were found for either PA levels or ST. Only 10.7% of the participants met the global recommendations on PA for health. The participants of the current study showed low PA levels and a high prevalence of ST. Interestingly, when comparing age and/or sex groups, no differences were observed for ST. Our findings provide novel and valuable information to be considered in future interventions aiming to increase PA levels and reduce ST. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Article
Enhancing Youth Participation Using the PREP Intervention: Parents’ Perspectives
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091005 - 02 Sep 2017
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3325
Abstract
Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation (PREP), an innovative intervention aimed at modifying the environment and coaching youth/parents, was found to be effective in improving youth participation in chosen community activities. In order to complement existing quantitative evidence, this study examined parents’ [...] Read more.
Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation (PREP), an innovative intervention aimed at modifying the environment and coaching youth/parents, was found to be effective in improving youth participation in chosen community activities. In order to complement existing quantitative evidence, this study examined parents’ perspectives on the PREP approach. Twelve parents of youth with physical disabilities (12 to 18 years old) who received the PREP approach participated in individual semi-structured interviews following the 12-week intervention delivered by an occupational therapist. Thematic analysis revealed three inter-linked themes, the first of which was informative, describing the “nature of intervention”, and led to two reflective themes: “multi-faceted effects of care” and “process of care”. Parents highlighted the effect of the PREP intervention in a broad sense, extending beyond the accomplishment of the selected activities. This involved improvements on the physical, emotional, and social levels as well as in autonomy. Parents also discussed how their own needs were acknowledged through the intervention and recognized the unique role of the occupational therapist in supporting this process. The findings provide additional information about the usefulness of the PREP approach and describe the various benefits generated by a single intervention. Such knowledge can expand the therapeutic options for positive, health-promoting participation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Review

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Review
Mental Health Interventions for Parent Carers of Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Practice Guidelines from a Critical Interpretive Synthesis (CIS) Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020341 - 14 Feb 2018
Cited by 51 | Viewed by 6380
Abstract
Parent carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often report increased levels of stress, depression, and anxiety. Unmet parent carer mental health needs pose a significant risk to the psychological, physical, and social well-being of the parents of the child affected by [...] Read more.
Parent carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often report increased levels of stress, depression, and anxiety. Unmet parent carer mental health needs pose a significant risk to the psychological, physical, and social well-being of the parents of the child affected by ASD and jeopardize the adaptive functioning of the family as well as the potential of the child affected by ASD. This systematic review identifies key qualities of interventions supporting the mental health of parent carers and proposes practitioner-parent carer support guidelines. A search of four databases (Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Social Science Data) was conducted to identify studies that met the following criteria: (1) an intervention was delivered to parent carers of a child with ASD under the age of 18 years; (2) the research design allowed for a comparison on outcomes across groups; and (3) outcome measures of the parent carers’ mental health were used. A total of 23 studies met the inclusion criteria. A critical interpretive synthesis approach was used to produce an integrated conceptualization of the evidence. Findings suggest practitioner guidelines to support the mental health and wellbeing of parent carers should include addressing the parent’s self-perspective taking and skill for real time problem-solving. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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Other

Commentary
Preparing Physical and Occupational Therapists to Be Health Promotion Practitioners: A Call for Action
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020392 - 24 Feb 2018
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 7258
Abstract
Experts around the world support the integration of health promotion and wellness (HPW) services into traditional health care services. If successfully executed, the addition of HPW services would reduce rates of death and disability and significantly reduce health care costs. While all health [...] Read more.
Experts around the world support the integration of health promotion and wellness (HPW) services into traditional health care services. If successfully executed, the addition of HPW services would reduce rates of death and disability and significantly reduce health care costs. While all health care providers should be engaged in providing HPW services, many believe that physical therapists (PTs) and occupational therapists (OTs) are uniquely positioned to provide these services. However, research suggests that clinicians in both fields may fall short in doing so. Likewise, research indicates that entry-level educational programs inadequately prepare PT and OT students to be HPW practitioners. The overall purpose of this paper is to provide recommendations to educators for preparing PT and OT students and clinicians to better meet the HPW needs of the clients and patients they serve. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion Interventions for People with Disabilities)
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