Special Issue "From cognitive psychology to clinical and health research and back: Applying tasks and concepts from cognitive psychology to health-related questions"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Franziska Plessow
Website
Guest Editor
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States
Interests: biological psychology; cognitive control; cognitive psychology; experimental psychology; psychoneuroendocrinology
PD Dr. Thomas Kleinsorge
Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz Research Center for Working Enviroment and Human Factors, Germany
Interests: cognitive control; (Un)Intentional behavior; task switching; cognitive flexibility; stress; psychoneuroendocrinology; representations of tasks and actions
Dr. Poppy Watson
Website
Guest Editor
School of Psychology, University of New South Wales (UNSW) Australia, Sydney, Australia
Interests: attentional control; goal-directed actions; habits; reward-seeking behavior; eating behavior; addiction; compulsivity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The applications of tasks and concepts from cognitive psychology to health-related questions are widespread in clinical and health research. Experimental paradigms designed to capture specific cognitive capabilities are frequently used in health science, such as cognitive tasks to examine the balance between cognitive control (exerted to achieve a specific internal goal) and conflicting action tendencies and desires to unveil the mechanisms driving maladaptive behavior and decision-making as observed in substance use, anxiety, or eating disorders. Similarly, theories from cognitive psychology have informed a number of behavioral interventions in health psychology, such as training programs for countering cognitive biases or the use of implementation intentions to reduce snacking. Conversely, insights from the health and clinical domains around patterns of cognitive dysfunction and the intersection between cognition and motivation contribute to refining cognitive theories and stimulate the development of experimental paradigms to tackle novel research questions in basic and clinical research. Thus, this fruitful exchange of knowledge and tools implemented by interdisciplinary research teams presents a cornerstone of advancement in both cognitive psychology and clinical/health research. However, while the cross-disciplinary exchange of methods and models is taking place, time lags in communicating recent advancements in one field across disciplinary boundaries and a lack of established channels for this enriching communication between the research communities still limit the full potential of this important exchange of insights. This Special Issue aims to bring together experts from cognitive psychology and clinical and health research to highlight new areas of research with high transfer potential, provide state-of-the-art examples of successful cross-disciplinary enrichment, and outline novel avenues for further promoting a constructive and timely exchange of knowledge between cognitive psychology and health and clinical research.

We would be delighted to have you join us in this cross-disciplinary endeavor!

Best wishes,

Franziska Plessow
Thomas Kleinsorge
Poppy Watson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognitive psychology
  • clinical psychology
  • cognitive control
  • executive dysfunction
  • impulsivity
  • intentional behavior
  • response inhibition
  • self-regulation
  • compulsivity
  • maladaptive behavior
  • behavioral interventions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessCommentary
A Conceptual Model of Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance: The Importance of Cognitive, Empirical and Computational Approaches
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020635 - 13 Jan 2021
Abstract
Living with obesity is related to numerous negative health outcomes, including various cancers, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Although much is known about the factors associated with obesity, and a range of weight loss interventions have been established, changing health-related behaviours to [...] Read more.
Living with obesity is related to numerous negative health outcomes, including various cancers, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Although much is known about the factors associated with obesity, and a range of weight loss interventions have been established, changing health-related behaviours to positively affect obesity outcomes has proven difficult. In this paper, we first draw together major factors that have emerged within the literature on weight loss to describe a new conceptual framework of long-term weight loss maintenance. Key to this framework is the suggestion that increased positive social support influences a reduction in psychosocial stress, and that this has the effect of promoting better executive functioning which in turn facilitates the development of healthy habits and the breaking of unhealthy habits, leading to improved ongoing maintenance of weight loss. We then outline how the use of computational approaches are an essential next step, to more rigorously test conceptual frameworks, such as the one we propose, and the benefits that a mixture of conceptual, empirical and computational approaches offer to the field of health psychology. Full article
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