Special Issue "Advances in Understanding Gestational Weight Gain"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Andrea L. Deierlein
Website
Guest Editor
College of Global Public Health, New York University, 715/719 Broadway, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10003, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gestational weight gain (GWG) is a complex prenatal exposure that is a critical research focus because it is one of few modifiable behaviors during pregnancy. Low and high GWG, independent of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) status, are associated with adverse short- and long-term maternal and offspring health outcomes, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, small-for-gestational age, macrosomia, as well as maternal and offspring obesity. The influence of GWG on health outcomes likely varies by timing and rates of gain during the course of pregnancy. For example, greater GWG in early-to-mid pregnancy is associated with greater offspring fat mass and poor cardio-metabolic health indicators during childhood. However, gaps remain in the GWG literature regarding recommendations across different populations of women, the investigation of patterns of GWG throughout pregnancy, as well as prenatal management strategies.

This Special Issue seeks papers examining advances in our understanding of GWG including methods to measure and assess GWG; prenatal counseling and management of GWG during pregnancy; predictors of GWG, particularly psychosocial, dietary, and physical activity factors; and outcomes of GWG throughout the life course. The inclusion of ethnically, culturally, economically, and BMI- (i.e., women with underweight or obesity) diverse populations is highly encouraged. Epidemiological and interventional studies will be considered. High-quality narrative and systematic reviews will be also considered.

Prof. Andrea L. Deierlein
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Gestational weight gain;
  • Obesity;
  • Diet;
  • Physical activity;
  • Chronic disease;
  • Life course;
  • Prenatal.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Predictors of Gestational Weight Gain in a Low-Income Hispanic Population: Sociodemographic Characteristics, Health Behaviors, and Psychosocial Stressors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010352 - 04 Jan 2020
Abstract
Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of weight associated complications in pregnancy. This ethnic disparity is likely related to behavior patterns, social circumstances, environmental exposures, and access to healthcare, rather than biologic differences. The objective was to determine associations between sociodemographic characteristics, health [...] Read more.
Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of weight associated complications in pregnancy. This ethnic disparity is likely related to behavior patterns, social circumstances, environmental exposures, and access to healthcare, rather than biologic differences. The objective was to determine associations between sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, and psychosocial stressors and gestational weight gain (GWG) in low-income Hispanic women. During pregnancy, information on sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, and psychosocial stressors were collected. Linear regression estimated mean differences in GWG by selected predictors. Multinomial logistic regression estimated odds of inadequate and excessive GWG by selected predictors. Five-hundred and eight women were included, 38% had inadequate and 28% had excessive GWG; 57% with a normal pre-pregnancy BMI had inadequate GWG. Compared to women with normal BMI, women with overweight or obesity were more likely to have excessive GWG (aRRR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.40 and aRRR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.62, respectively). Mean total GWG was higher among women who were nulliparous (ß = 1.34 kg, 95% CI: 0.38, 2.29) and those who engaged in ≥3 h of screen time daily (ß = 0.98 kg, 95% CI: 0.02, 1.94), and lower among women who were physically active during pregnancy (ß = −1.00 kg, 95% CI: −1.99, −0.03). Eating breakfast daily was associated with lower risk of inadequate GWG (aRRR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.26, 0.83). Depressive symptoms and poor adherence to dietary recommendations were prevalent, but none of the psychosocial or dietary variables were associated with GWG. In this cohort of primarily immigrant, low-income, Hispanic women, there were high rates of poor adherence to diet and physical activity recommendations, and a majority of women did not meet GWG guidelines. Modifiable health behaviors were associated with GWG, and their promotion should be included in prenatal care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Understanding Gestational Weight Gain)
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