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Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Physical Activity and Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 6331

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, University of Dong-Eui, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 471, Republic of Korea
Interests: exercise physiology; immunology; obesity; exercise; nutrition; physical allergy; metabolic syndrome; dance-intervention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this Collection entitled “Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Physical Activity and Health”. This issue will be a collection of papers from researchers invited by the Editorial Board Members. The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between IJERPH and scholars in the field of modeling disease risk and outcomes. All papers will be fully open access upon publication after peer review.

Prof. Dr. Richard B. Kreider
Dr. Yi-Sub Kwak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exercise physiology
  • sports nutrition
  • performance enhancement
  • weight loss
  • obesity
  • exercise
  • nutrition
  • physical activity
  • sport and health

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 368 KiB  
Article
Physical Activity and Associated Factors among Brazilian Adult Inmates: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Wanessa Cristina Baccon, Carlos Laranjeira, Priscila Garcia Marques, Carla Franciele Höring, Adriana Martins Gallo, Juliane Pagliari Araujo, Francielle Renata Danielli Martins Marques, Lígia Carreira and Maria Aparecida Salci
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(6), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21060748 - 7 Jun 2024
Viewed by 509
Abstract
Previous studies on health in prison facilities have determined that imprisonment has adverse effects on both physical and emotional well-being. Therefore, the introduction of public health measures is encouraged. This study aimed to (a) evaluate the levels of physical activity and the health [...] Read more.
Previous studies on health in prison facilities have determined that imprisonment has adverse effects on both physical and emotional well-being. Therefore, the introduction of public health measures is encouraged. This study aimed to (a) evaluate the levels of physical activity and the health condition of a sample of Brazilian prisoners and (b) determine the predictors of low physical activity. An observational and cross-sectional study was developed following the STROBE checklist. Data collection took place between June and November 2019 in a maximum-security Brazilian prison institution. This study’s final sample included 220 people selected through convenience sampling, of which 115 (53.2%) were aged 18 to 29 years, followed by 79 (36.6%) aged 30 to 44 years and 22 (10.2%) aged 45 to 59 years old. Overall, 64.3% of participants failed to meet the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation for physical activity [at least 150–300 min of moderate-intensity or 75 min of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week]. The majority reported unhealthy food consumption (116; 53.7%). Regarding body mass index (BMI), 50.2% of individuals were classified as eutrophic, 38.1% were overweight and 11.6% were obese. Older age (AOR: 0.95; CI95%: 0.92–0.99; p = 0.01) and sitting time (AOR: 0.74; CI95%: 0.65–0.85; p < 0.01) were associated with low adherence to physical activity. Our results highlight the importance of practicing physical activity within the prison context and the need for institutional programs that promote regular physical activity. Full article
13 pages, 343 KiB  
Article
Association between Physical Activity and Health Outcomes (High Body Fatness, High Blood Pressure) in Namibian Adolescents and Adult women
by Hilde Liisa Nashandi, Andries Makama Monyeki and John J. Reilly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040446 - 5 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1180
Abstract
Regular physical activity (PA) is known to promote the physical and mental health of children and adolescents and further prevent the development of health problems in adulthood. Information on body composition and PA is crucial for health promotion strategies and for epidemiological studies [...] Read more.
Regular physical activity (PA) is known to promote the physical and mental health of children and adolescents and further prevent the development of health problems in adulthood. Information on body composition and PA is crucial for health promotion strategies and for epidemiological studies informing policies. However, there is limited data on the association between body composition and PA in Namibia. This dearth of published data is a significant shortcoming in the development of strategies and policies to promote PA in Namibia. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between PA as a dependent variable and independent variables such as high blood pressure and body fatness as measured by different methods (gold standard deuterium dilution, body mass index, mid upper arm circumference, and waist circumference). The study included 206 healthy adolescent girls aged 13–19 years and 207 young adult females aged 20–40 years from Windhoek, Namibia. PA was measured using the PACE+ questionnaire in adolescents, and the GPAQ questionnaire was used for adults. In adolescents, only 33% of the participants met the recommended guidelines for PA, compared to only 2% for adults. Nevertheless, the study found no statistically significant association between PA and blood pressure indices (p-value < 0.05) among adolescents and adults. However, there was a significant association between PA and high body fatness (p-value < 0.001) and waist circumference (p-value = 0.014) in adolescents. Among adults, PA was significantly related to waist circumference only. In conclusion, failure to meet recommended PA guidelines is strongly associated with abdominal obesity and high body fatness. The knowledge gained from this study may be used by policymakers in the development of strategic policies and interventions aimed at promoting PA as a public priority and improving health outcomes. Full article
17 pages, 3735 KiB  
Article
Implementation of a Community-Based Mind–Body (Tae-Bo) Physical Activity Programme on Health-Related Physical Fitness in Rural Black Overweight and Obese Women with Manifest Risk Factors for Multimorbidity
by Musa Mathunjwa, Ina Shaw, Jason Moran, Gavin R. Sandercock, Gregory A. Brown and Brandon S. Shaw
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(15), 6463; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20156463 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1478
Abstract
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death globally, particularly impacting low- and middle-income countries and rural dwellers. Therefore, this programme aimed to investigate if a community-based mind–body PA programme implemented in a low-resource setting could improve health-related physical fitness outcomes. Black [...] Read more.
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death globally, particularly impacting low- and middle-income countries and rural dwellers. Therefore, this programme aimed to investigate if a community-based mind–body PA programme implemented in a low-resource setting could improve health-related physical fitness outcomes. Black overweight or obese adult women (25 ± 4.7 years) with a body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg·m−2 recruited from a rural settlement in South Africa with manifest risk factors for multimorbidity were assigned to a 10-week waiting-to-treat non-exercising control group (n = 65) or a community-based mind–body programme (n = 60) consisting of 45–60 min, thrice-weekly Tae-Bo. The intervention resulted in significant (p ≤ 0.05) improvements in body weight (p = 0.043), BMI (p = 0.037), and waist (p = 0.031) and hip circumferences (p = 0.040). Flexibility was found to be significantly increased at mid- and post-programme (p = 0.033 and p = 0.025, respectively) as was static balance (mid: p = 0.022; post: p = 0.019), hand grip strength (mid: p = 0.034; post: p = 0.029), sit-up performance (mid: p = 0.021; post: p = 0.018), and cardiorespiratory endurance (mid: p = 0.017; post: p = 0.011). No significant change was found in sum of skinfolds following the programme (p = 0.057). Such a community-based mind–body programme presents an opportunity to level health inequalities and positively improve health-related physical fitness in low-resource communities irrespective of the underlying barriers to participation. Full article
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13 pages, 2095 KiB  
Article
Profiling Physical Fitness of Physical Education Majors Using Unsupervised Machine Learning
by Diego A. Bonilla, Isabel A. Sánchez-Rojas, Darío Mendoza-Romero, Yurany Moreno, Jana Kočí, Luis M. Gómez-Miranda, Daniel Rojas-Valverde, Jorge L. Petro and Richard B. Kreider
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010146 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2423
Abstract
The academic curriculum has shown to promote sedentary behavior in college students. This study aimed to profile the physical fitness of physical education majors using unsupervised machine learning and to identify the differences between sexes, academic years, socioeconomic strata, and the generated profiles. [...] Read more.
The academic curriculum has shown to promote sedentary behavior in college students. This study aimed to profile the physical fitness of physical education majors using unsupervised machine learning and to identify the differences between sexes, academic years, socioeconomic strata, and the generated profiles. A total of 542 healthy and physically active students (445 males, 97 females; 19.8 [2.2] years; 66.0 [10.3] kg; 169.5 [7.8] cm) participated in this cross-sectional study. Their indirect VO2max (Cooper and Shuttle-Run 20 m tests), lower-limb power (horizontal jump), sprint (30 m), agility (shuttle run), and flexibility (sit-and-reach) were assessed. The participants were profiled using clustering algorithms after setting the optimal number of clusters through an internal validation using R packages. Non-parametric tests were used to identify the differences (p < 0.05). The higher percentage of the population were freshmen (51.4%) and middle-income (64.0%) students. Seniors and juniors showed a better physical fitness than first-year students. No significant differences were found between their socioeconomic strata (p > 0.05). Two profiles were identified using hierarchical clustering (Cluster 1 = 318 vs. Cluster 2 = 224). The matching analysis revealed that physical fitness explained the variation in the data, with Cluster 2 as a sex-independent and more physically fit group. All variables differed significantly between the sexes (except the body mass index [p = 0.218]) and the generated profiles (except stature [p = 0.559] and flexibility [p = 0.115]). A multidimensional analysis showed that the body mass, cardiorespiratory fitness, and agility contributed the most to the data variation so that they can be used as profiling variables. This profiling method accurately identified the relevant variables to reinforce exercise recommendations in a low physical performance and overweight majors. Full article
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